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by Neil Elliott
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Leaders & Notable People
  • Author:
    Neil Elliott
  • ISBN:
    1594082421
  • ISBN13:
    978-1594082429
  • Genre:
  • Publisher:
    Cork Hill Pr (July 13, 2003)
  • Pages:
    228 pages
  • Subcategory:
    Leaders & Notable People
  • Language:
  • FB2 format
    1965 kb
  • ePUB format
    1672 kb
  • DJVU format
    1901 kb
  • Rating:
    4.5
  • Votes:
    967
  • Formats:
    txt lrf lrf doc


Jesus is the WAY, like a road to be followed, not to stand back and admire. He was put here to teach us how to take care of ourselves and brought us closer to morals! This book humanized the legend.

Jesus is the WAY, like a road to be followed, not to stand back and admire. It gave me a much better understanding of how the people in that time lived. Everything in this book is plausable. This book says "why not?"

In the book Jesus seems to be feeling his way into what he is called to do, and is not too happy about it, although . Neil Elliott is one of the best writers I've come across in a long time. He doesn't try to use gimmickry or stylistic tricks - just clear and honest writing that comes straight from the heart.

In the book Jesus seems to be feeling his way into what he is called to do, and is not too happy about it, although he realizes the importance of his message. Ironically, the book is clouded in the details of Christ's actual death and resurrection. The reader is left to guess and perhaps ponder on what really happened; however, there is a strong message of faith. Indeed humor, pathos and enjoyment are all to be had in this book.

He left the world as a homeless mendicant at the mercy of the world's greatest Empire.

Published July 13, 2003 by Cork Hill Press. There's no description for this book yet.

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Elliott, Neil 1946–(Neil Elliott Blum) PERSONAL:Born March 1, 1946, in Chicago, IL; son of Sol (a truck owner) and Helen . The Autobiography of Jesus Christ as Told To: Neil Elliott, Cork Hill Press (Indianapolis, IN), 2003

Elliott, Neil 1946–(Neil Elliott Blum) PERSONAL:Born March 1, 1946, in Chicago, IL; son of Sol (a truck owner) and Helen Blum; married Kathleen Stagg, 1969; children: four. Education: Northwestern University, . ADDRESSES:Home-Evanston, IL. Source for information on Elliott, Neil 1946–: Contemporary Authors, New Revision Series dictionary. The Autobiography of Jesus Christ as Told To: Neil Elliott, Cork Hill Press (Indianapolis, IN), 2003. Author of a screenplay, "The Collaborators;" writer of episodes for television series, including "Route 66, Naked City, Alfred Hitchcock Presents, Edge of Night," and "Day in Court.

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The first book that comes to mind is The Story of the Other Wiseman by Henry Van Dyke. If you're looking for a novel, you might try The Autobiography of Jesus Christ as Told to Neil Elliott by Neil Elliott. It's the story of the fourth wiseman, going to seek the newborn King. It begins around Persia, then travels from there. It's more about his journey than Persia, however. One interesting aspect of this book for me is that Neil Elliott is Jewish. In his novel, he shows great reverence for Jesus but at the same time he shows us the human side, at least as he imagines it.

Just a man talking about his life... Suppose your uncle or your father was sitting around the living room talking about his life. The Autobiography of Jesus Christ is something like that. So it's not a comedy, but at the same time Jesus may occasionally say something that strikes you as funny. Just a man talking about his life. Beginning with Jesus' early life in Nazareth, moving through the Missing Years in a Roman Empire of open borders, pursuing the well-known story of Jesus' Ministry, and ending as always, in Jesus' passion on the Cross, Neil Elliott's long interview with the leading historical figure of the last 2,000 years presents us with a personal story unmatched in human history. He left the world as a homeless mendicant at the mercy of the world's greatest Empire. And yet within 300 years he would be worshipped by most of the citizens of that Empire. His life is contained in history and yet contains it.

Thundershaper
The author attempts to portray a sort of "oral history" of Jesus Christ - as if He were telling you about his life. Although obviously not based entirely on the doctrine of the Christian church, it is nevertheless fascinating on several levels. You can read this as purely a historical account of the times. A young man of moderate wealth may have indeed traveled far and wide through what is now modern Europe and Britain. Everyday details were obviously well-researched and the reader is immersed in what it might have been like to live in those days. The state of religious beliefs is deeply explored as is the political situation of the time. It is hard to communicate how well the author worked all this into the storyline, but I was left with a great understanding of the forces at play during the life of Christ. You could read this as an insight into what might have motivated Jesus to do and speak what he did. Again, this is not Biblical based but is certainly interesting given the many ambiguous statements Christ makes in the Bible..."what is truth?" is one of them. In the book Jesus seems to be feeling his way into what he is called to do, and is not too happy about it, although he realizes the importance of his message. Ironically, the book is clouded in the details of Christ's actual death and resurrection. The reader is left to guess and perhaps ponder on what really happened; however, there is a strong message of faith. Indeed humor, pathos and enjoyment are all to be had in this book. Overall, a great read! The only downside is a problem with paragraph formatting - a wee bit confusing, but not a major sticking point.
Jia
I respected the author's bold attempt on creating a life for Christ that may have been far different than the sterile reading of the Gospels. Jesus' musings, frailties and lack of confidence as well as his perceived lack of clarity was touching. It especially endeared me to read him basically saying "What the heck am I really doing?".

We will never be clear on the life of this man until we pass ourselves. I know that there was a human side to Christ, and if anything, it made me respect him more.

To me, this book was a courageous move to see behind the dogma.
Sharpmane
I didn't expect to love it. I read it because I said I would and knew the author to be a clever writer. I was feeling a little "Jesus-ed out" having just read straight through "Master & Margarita" - twice.
So, surprise me like that anytime!

It is indeed well written. It reads something like a conversation, in which you can either participate or observe as it transpires. In that sense, it is an easy read. However, in my opinion, that's a little deceptive. There is a lot in there, and I think it's very much the case that you get out of it, what you put in. It should be read twice.

It is written with a certain unapologetic candor that grants a degree of authenticity to an otherwise wildly implausible subject. It is not over-written, that is to say, the author leaves a sufficiency of ambiguity that both enhances the realistic tone and allows for personal interpretation.

The material appears to be well researched - I didn't fact check it - smoothly co-mingling known history, biblical data, and fiction. I thought the reconciliation of some of the many confusing & conflicting parts of the Bible was brilliant.

The Southerners who have insisted to me; "after TWO THOUSAND YEARS there has NEVER been a SINGLE contradiction found in the Bible", may find that part eye opening. Certainly my suggestion that they Google "inconsistencies in the Bible" has never been well received. I expect, going forward, I'll simply recommend "AUTOBIOGRAPHY".
Ubrise
Silly concept
Anicasalar
I can't recommend this book highly enough! It satisfied me at so many different levels. To be entertained, to laugh and cry, to learn, and finally to be inspired - to find all that in one book is the ultimate reading experience. I was hooked from the moment I picked it up. For someone who's not religious nor even a Christian, I was surprised to find myself so engrossed in a book about the leading figure in Christianity. But to me, it wasn't so much a book about a religion as about a man and his life in a distant time and place. And a life that could easily be transposed into the present. I heard my grandfather's voice echoing from the pages, that gently sarcastic humour, the unique turn of a phrase. As Jesus recounted his early years, I could imagine myself experiencing the same feelings and doubts and joys. Were they real? Who knows. Who cares. The story by itself would have been enough to qualify this book as a good read. The rich historical background that was woven throughout the narrative made the book truly outstanding. Neil Elliott is one of the best writers I've come across in a long time. He doesn't try to use gimmickry or stylistic tricks - just clear and honest writing that comes straight from the heart.
Darkraven
Another slant on the story of Jesus. The language of the narrative is modern and at times surprising-but still good reading.
Nuadador
This is a beautiful story. Answering questions which many of us have had all our lives but we're either afraid or embarrassed to ask.
Apart from what has been said by other reviewers about the amazing content; I would like to add that the author has a talent for writing in a very smooth staccato.