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by David Walker
Download Cyclops in the Jungle: A One-Eyed LRP in Vietnam (Stackpole Military History Series) fb2
Leaders & Notable People
  • Author:
    David Walker
  • ISBN:
    0811734927
  • ISBN13:
    978-0811734929
  • Genre:
  • Publisher:
    Stackpole Books (November 10, 2008)
  • Pages:
    240 pages
  • Subcategory:
    Leaders & Notable People
  • Language:
  • FB2 format
    1188 kb
  • ePUB format
    1268 kb
  • DJVU format
    1804 kb
  • Rating:
    4.5
  • Votes:
    750
  • Formats:
    doc lit lrf lrf


Cyclops in the Jungle is a very short book (2,375 locations) about a man who goes off to Vietnam, loses an eye, and amazingly get himself back to Vietnam to continue his unfinished business. The author certainly had/has large cajones

Cyclops in the Jungle is a very short book (2,375 locations) about a man who goes off to Vietnam, loses an eye, and amazingly get himself back to Vietnam to continue his unfinished business. The author certainly had/has large cajones. You get lots of details about life in Vietnam, and the tools of the trade. Honestly, I found the author's personal stuff the most interesting.

About the Author Staff Sergeant David P. Walker spent ten years in the . Army with Airborne, LRP, Ranger, and Infantry units Added to basket.

Cyclops in the Jungle book. Cyclops in the Jungle: A One-Eyed LRP in Vietnam. One-of-a-kind story of resilience and determination in the Vietnam?War - Written in a no-holds-barred, from-the-gut style. In January 1968, barely a month after arriving in Vietnam as part of an elite long range patrol (LRP) team, Dave Walker received a debilitating shrapnel wound to his eye.

Free (Kindle) Cyclops in the Jungle About the Author: David "Varmint" Walker served ten years in the .

Free (Kindle) Cyclops in the Jungle. About the Author: David "Varmint" Walker served ten years in the . Army with airborne, long range patrol, Ranger, and conventional infantry units, including multiple tours in Vietnam and an assignment in Germany. He lives in northern California.

Publisher:Stackpole Books.

book by David P. Walker. In January 1968, barely a month after arriving in Vietnam, Dave Walker received a debilitating shrapnel wound to his eye. Medically discharged and sent home, Walker-now missing an eye-maneuvered his way back into the army and back to Vietnam in 1970, where he served another eighteen months conducting patrols and special operations in the Central Highlands. Publisher:Stackpole Books. 83 lbs. Dimensions:0. You Might Also Enjoy.

Stackpole Books (November 10, 2008). One-of-a-kind story of resilience and determination in the Vietnam War. Combat action with a long-range patrol (LRP) team. Written in a no-holds-barred, from-the-gut style.

One-of-a-kind story of resilience and determination in the Vietnam War.

Cyclops in the Jungle. General military history. Cavalry from Hoof to Track. Flying American Combat Aircraft: The Cold War. Here There Are Tigers. Land with No Sun. Phantom Reflections. Stackpole Military History Series.

Stackpole Military History: Cyclops in the Jungle : A One-Eyed LRP in Vietnam by David P. Walker (2010 . I bought this book for my son, who is a Black Hawk command pilot. Walker (2010, Paperback). With the politically correct environment of today, it is a good idea to know how real Calvary soldiers operated in the past. Computers are not a necessity in planning for any potential engagement, many times they are more of an hindrance. or government agency head, who stores essential info on ANY computer, is a fool. There is no substitute for disciplined aggression.

Cyclops in the Jungle: A One-Eyed LRP in Vietnam (Stackpole Military History Series) EAN 978081173.

One-of-a-kind story of resilience and determination in the Vietnam War Combat action with a long-range patrol (LRP) team Written in a no-holds-barred, from-the-gut style

In January 1968, barely a month after arriving in Vietnam, Dave Walker received a debilitating shrapnel wound to his eye. Medically discharged and sent home, Walker--now missing an eye--maneuvered his way back into the army and back to Vietnam in 1970, where he served another eighteen months conducting patrols and special operations in the Central Highlands.


thrust
I'm 80% through reading this book and I can say it's a favorite of mine as I've read a lot of non-fiction books about the Vietnam war and the roles different soldiers played. I don't read fiction books on the subject because I was a combat soldier with the 4th Infantry Division and I was grunt in Vietnam in 1969 in II Corp and I can see through the fake for real experiences in about 50 pages. The author tells his story in a no nonsense why that is to the point and in fact if anything it is under stated. The fact that he figured out a way to get himself back in a combat unit as elite as the Ranger LRP's after losing an eye is both a testament to his bravery and his desire to serve this country.

I experienced many of the same things he did except in the company of a Platoon or full Infantry Company on search & destroy missions. All the things he talks about are things that only the few who experienced it can know firsthand. I want to say again that what he did as a LRP was exponentially more dangerous than what I did because of the fact they operated in small teams and if exposed the situation was immediately a live or die situation.

Lastly, I can't even begin to say what guts it took for him to do he did by going back and to thank him for sharing his experience with us.
Kelezel
This is truly one of the very best books on the Vietnam war itself from someone who was there in every aspect of it. He truly experienced everything that is written. To me it was so real it made me feel like I was back in that part of Vietnam all over again. The book in itself is so dicript in it's sights, smells and feelings, even a person who was never there can feel as if they were. It is a true and unbias report on what took place over there and what our positions were in this affair. I can say this with an open heart since the author, Dave Walker, is a very good and dear friend of mine. Although we didn't serve together in the same unit, we were there at the same times and in the same places. Dave and I even were evaced to the same hospital in Japan to recover from our wounds. So, for any non-believers, this book is the real deal and Dave is one of the guys who all Veterans can look up to and or call him "Brother" for he truly is one and earned the title as well as we all did. Thanks Dave for telling us all your story!!! Nick.
YSOP
Probably shouldn't be writing a review for a book I wrote the intro for, but I wouldn't have written the intro if I didn't like the story. And Dave Walker had a story that needed to be told. As a fellow LRP/Ranger I can tell you that physical impairments were not tolerated in our kind of units. Being able to function in extreme situations for extended periods of time is a requirement in all special operation units. If you can't cut the mustard, you are mustered out. Dave Walker lost an eye in his first go around in the LRPs, was sent home for treatment and medically retired from the service. A year later, he's back in the military, back in Nam, and back in a Ranger unit. His story is not only remarkable, but is a shining example of the kind of men from our generation who served their country with as much dedication, skill and patriotism as those who served before us. Our generation of warriors bore the shame of an unpopular war, a shame that we didn't deserve. Read Dave Walker's story and be proud to be an American.
Gary Linderer
A brother
Mori
Downloaded the Kindle version and glad I did. Personal story of just one of the unsung heroes from the Vietnam era, not that he was looking to be a hero, just a good old red blooded American boy who got stuck in a politically and morally changing time period in American history. Did not want to put it down. Very engaging read. Recommended for someone who wants to have an idea of what it was like in Vietnam this would be a good quick read. Kindle version downside is the lack of clarity in some of the photos included in the book. The only thing at upset me in the read was the lack of respect shown him (and I know other Vets) returning home stateside. I remember it back in the 60's-70's.....but all the garbage our American Vets had to face is a national disgrace. Nearly 50 years later reading about it, still it sickens. So THANK YOU all Vietnam Vets for your service!
Armin
Cyclops in the Jungle is a very short book (2,375 locations) about a man who goes off to Vietnam, loses an eye, and amazingly get himself back to Vietnam to continue his unfinished business. The author certainly had/has large cajones. You get lots of details about life in Vietnam, and the tools of the trade.

Honestly, I found the author's personal stuff the most interesting. His parent's divorce, his father moving in with a topless dancer and them double dating, the father having PTSD - wish there had been more of it.

I was able to pick it up for free, as Stackpole puts Kindle versions out for free on occasion. For $10, it's a bit light.
Jairani
An excellent read. I had the pleasure of meeting & getting to know Dave at the VFW club in Nevada City, CA in 2005. Besides being a Vietnam veteran myself, I was a lifelong best friend of the SP4 Joseph D. (Jay) Hayes whose being KIA is reported in the book. I truly appreciated Dave's firsthand account of the incident to me. Dave passed away in 2014 and I will miss our conversations.
Qag
If you like true stories about people, this is a very good book. If you are not familiar with military terms you may miss some meanings, but still understandable. It is very well written by the person who lived through WAR in Vietnam. He lived through it, but will have physical, mental, and emotional scars for life. One of our country's greatest shames is the way we treated Vietnam Veterans. All combat veterans, from WWII to those returning from currant wars, should be honored by all Americans. It's our political leaders that get us into wars. Not our soldiers.