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by John McKenzie
Download On Time, On Target: The World War II Memoir of a Paratrooper in the 82nd Airborne fb2
Leaders & Notable People
  • Author:
    John McKenzie
  • ISBN:
    0891417141
  • ISBN13:
    978-0891417149
  • Genre:
  • Publisher:
    Presidio Press; 1st Edition edition (May 15, 2000)
  • Pages:
    304 pages
  • Subcategory:
    Leaders & Notable People
  • Language:
  • FB2 format
    1663 kb
  • ePUB format
    1968 kb
  • DJVU format
    1436 kb
  • Rating:
    4.2
  • Votes:
    416
  • Formats:
    mbr lrf txt mobi


On Time, On Target breaks the mold! John McKenzie was a forward artillery observer in the 456th Parachute Field artillery .

On Time, On Target breaks the mold! John McKenzie was a forward artillery observer in the 456th Parachute Field artillery Battalion of the 82nd Airborne Division. His battalion, attached to the 505th Regimental Combat Team, was designed to provide the heavy punch of artillery support to the otherwise lightly armed parachute infantry regiments. Therefore, instead of dropping at night with the rest of the 82nd Airborne, the 456th came ashore on Utah Beach on D + 3 with all their equipment and ammo to rejoin and support their division. Most of the men were not even qualified parachutists at that time. McKenzie describes the battles in Normandy until his unit rotated back to England.

As a teenager, John McKenzie joined the 82nd Airborne Division shortly before the invasion of Normandy in the summer of 1944. This memoir recalls his wartime experiences and his role in the liberation of France and Holland. The viewpoints expressed in this book are those of an enlisted soldier, not a commissioned officer or a general.

McKenzie, John D. On Time, on Target: The World War II Memoir of a Paratrooper in the 82nd Airborne. Novato, CA: Presidio Press, 2000. ISBN 0-891-41714-1 OCLC 42863044. McManus, John C. September Hope: The American Side of a Bridge Too Far. New York: New American Library, 2012. ISBN 0-451-23706-4 OCLC 741538553. All the Way to Berlin: A Paratrooper at War in Europe. New York: Ballantine Books, 2003. ISBN 0-891-41784-2 OCLC 50810144.

The 82nd Airborne Division War Memorial Museum is a museum located at Ardennes and Gela Streets on the Fort Bragg Army base. Established in 1945, the museum chronicles the history of the 82nd Airborne Division from 1917 to the present including World. Established in 1945, the museum chronicles the history of the 82nd Airborne Division from 1917 to the present including World War I, World War II, Vietnam War, and Persian Gulf Wars as well as campaigns in Grenada, Panama, Operation Golden Pheasant, Operation Restore Hope and Operation Enduring Freedom

McKenzie also served in the U. S. Army, 82nd Airborne Division during World War I. John McKenzie was born on June 24, 1924 in Los Angeles, California, United States. He is the son of Henry J. and F. Mildred McKenzie.

McKenzie also served in the U. Army, 82nd Airborne Division during World War II. Back to Profile. McKenzie graduated from Purdue University with a Bachelor of Science degree in 1948. Two years later he earned his Master of Business Administration from the University of Pennsylvania. McKenzie started his career at International Minerals and Chemical Corp. in Chicago, where he worked as a director of administration since 1950.

Book Description: The memoir of paratrooper Kurt Gabel - a German Jew who emigrated to the US in 1938, joined the 513th Regiment of the 17th Airborne Division, and fought against his former countrymen in the Battle of the Bulge. Gabel conveys with rare immediacy an in-depth look at the training of a paratrooper, the dangers of combat, and his transformation from romantic. He vividly recounts the fire fights and such episodes as narrow escapes, separation from his battalion and his rescue by another, and the interrogation of prisoners.

The All Americans of the 82nd Airborne Division (their distinctive red-white-and-blue shoulder patch featured a stylized double-A representing the fact that their World War I ancestors, the 82nd Infantry Division had been frawn from across the United States) participated in some of the toughest.

The All Americans of the 82nd Airborne Division (their distinctive red-white-and-blue shoulder patch featured a stylized double-A representing the fact that their World War I ancestors, the 82nd Infantry Division had been frawn from across the United States) participated in some of the toughest fighting of World War II. Related Products. Into the Crucible EAN 9780891417071 90. 4 руб. War in Korea, 1950-1953; A Pictorial History EAN 978089141. 46 руб. The Dragon Strikes EAN 978089141

Contents I The Airborne Invasion of Normandy- Plans and Preparations 1 Background 1 Early Planning- The COSSAC .

Contents I The Airborne Invasion of Normandy- Plans and Preparations 1 Background 1 Early Planning- The COSSAC Phase. We’re dedicated to reader privacy so we never track you. We never accept ads.

A selection of the Military Book ClubCol

A selection of the Military Book ClubCol. Mark James Alexander was the only airborne officer to lead three different battalions into combat in World War II, successively commanding the 2d and 1st Battalions, 505 Parachute Infantry Regiment, and the 2nd Battalion, 508 PIR, of the 82nd Airborne Division. BOOK NEWS, 07/2010 well worthwhile book covering the story of the US 82 Airborne Division and one of their finest unit commanders.

The All Americans of the 82nd Airborne Division (their distinctive red-white-and-blue shoulder patch featured a stylized double-A representing the fact that their World War I ancestors, the 82nd Infantry Division had been frawn from across the United States) participated in some of the toughest fighting of World War II.

Ielonere
Most memoirs dedicated to or written by paratroopers are of the dashing, crashing, leap out the plane and pull the ripcord kind. On Time, On Target breaks the mold! John McKenzie was a forward artillery observer in the 456th Parachute Field artillery Battalion of the 82nd Airborne Division. His battalion, attached to the 505th Regimental Combat Team, was designed to provide the heavy punch of artillery support to the otherwise lightly armed parachute infantry regiments.

Armed with 75-millimeter Pack Howitzers (12 to a battalion), the 456th did not jump into Normandy with the rest of the division. Their main weapon, the Pack Howitzer, was designed to be broken down into 12 pieces and carried on mules. For airborne operations, these same 12 pieces could be dropped in a package of parts and assembled on the ground. This assumed, of course, that all the parts could be found: a task that was more difficult in actual combat conditions than in training.

Therefore, instead of dropping at night with the rest of the 82nd Airborne, the 456th came ashore on Utah Beach on D + 3 with all their equipment and ammo to rejoin and support their division. Most of the men were not even qualified parachutists at that time. McKenzie describes the battles in Normandy until his unit rotated back to England.

The next time the 456th would see action would be in Operation Market-Garden in Holland. The unit was deployed in Waco gliders for this operation in which the author served as a glider co-pilot. After 6 weeks of fighting as infantry, the entire 82nd Airborne was withdrawn for refitting and replacements but that was interrupted by a large German attack that would result in the Battle of the Bulge. In this instance, the 456th was trucked into the Ardennes where they supported the defense of the northern shoulder and where the author was captured and escaped from the SS. For fans of airborne operations in World War II, this book provides an interesting change of pace as it concentrates on the little known and lesser written-about, parachute field artillery battalions.

John E. Nevola
Author of The Last Jump - A Novel of World War II
Runeshaper
Above all, this fine battlefield memoir is distinguished by clarity and honesty. John McKenzie's tale takes him from university student through wartime military training, the invasion of Normandy, Operation Market Garden, the Battle of the Bulge--and on into the cold peace and confrontations with our Russian "allies." McKenzie never strives for effect or spares himself. He describes his reactions to combat unsparingly and has a special knack for capturing the mundane aspects of a military campaign. He seems a man of great fairness and sound judgement, which makes his enlisted-man's view of the greatest battles of the allied campaign in the west especially valuable. Whether describing ad hoc paratrooper training in England or missions as a field artillery observer behind enemy lines, the brutality and fanaticism of SS officers or the human bonds that turn individual soldiers into a real unit, McKenzie has done a fine job. This is an excellent, highly-readable addition to the literature on World War II from a thoughtful, quietly-heroic man who embodies the traditions of the American citizen-soldier. Very highly recommended!
deadly claw
Having met a few men of the exceptional 82nd Airborne Division, I looked forward to reading this book. Unfortunately, I was somewhat disappointed. Author John McKenzie was a forward observer for the 456th Parachute Field Artillery Battalion, part of the 505th PRCT. His ability as an historian is not the failing of this work; it lies in his emotionless presentation. As an observer, his frequent visits to the front enabled him to see first hand the horror and aftermath of fierce and often hand to hand combat. He carries us with him from Normandy to Market Garden to the Bulge and finally to war's end and his return to civilian life. But reading his presentation, one does not encounter the visceral emotion present in most first hand accounts. McKenzie tells us he counted the losses of his friends until he could, due to the pain, count no more. We learn of their being wounded and their deaths without knowing who they were and why or what they meant to the author. Unlike most first hand accounts, we have no one with whom to identify, as if the book was written in the third person. This is not to say I didn't enjoy the book, indeed, several chapters were very well done, particularly the Huertgen Forest entry.
For a brief period during the Bulge, McKenzie and a few others were taken prisoner by fleeing members of Peiper's 1st SS Panzer. A friend was purposely shot for information and the others, including the author, conducted a daring escape. But the story is told without comment on the internal workings. It is just too dry for one who was there and the feel is that of an observer rather than a participant.
McKenzie implies several times that the horror of war and the losses he suffered forced him to shut down, to seal himself off and these old memories brought back to awareness were painful to deal with. It took courage to relive his war years for us. This defense mechanism, while more than understandable, has perhaps caused McKenzie to write a good book instead of a superior book.
ladushka
Solid book for someone who enjoys reading about Airborne Operations in WW2
Bolv
great book, excellent service
Bajinn
It's very very good