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by Ted J. Hartman,J. Ted Hartman
Download Tank Driver: With the 11th Armored from the Battle of the Bulge to VE Day fb2
Leaders & Notable People
  • Author:
    Ted J. Hartman,J. Ted Hartman
  • ISBN:
    0253342112
  • ISBN13:
    978-0253342119
  • Genre:
  • Publisher:
    Indiana University Press; 1st edition (June 4, 2003)
  • Pages:
    192 pages
  • Subcategory:
    Leaders & Notable People
  • Language:
  • FB2 format
    1393 kb
  • ePUB format
    1935 kb
  • DJVU format
    1790 kb
  • Rating:
    4.6
  • Votes:
    683
  • Formats:
    lrf txt doc lit


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Ted Hartman was 19 years old when he got behind the controls of a tank and drove it into battle. Letters home from a 19-year-old helped the author, Dr. J. Ted Hartman, reconstruct his experiences as a tank driver during the battle of the bulge

Ted Hartman was 19 years old when he got behind the controls of a tank and drove it into battle. After receiving a discharge from the army, he took a medical degree and became an orthopedic surgeon. He was founding chairman of the Department of Orthopaedic Surgery at the School of Medicine, Texas Tech University, from which he is now retired. Ted Hartman, reconstruct his experiences as a tank driver during the battle of the bulge. I think this is a must-read for any WW II history buff.

Ted Hartman was a teenager when he was sent overseas to drive a. .I saw many German soldiers filing out of buildings. Ted Hartman was 19 years old when he got behind the controls of a tank and drove it into battle.

Ted Hartman was a teenager when he was sent overseas to drive a Sherman tank into combat to face the desperate German counterattack known as the Battle of the Bulge.

When J. Ted Hartman became a driver in an M4 Sherman tank in the 11th Armored Division, he joined a relatively new branch of the . While the army was forward-looking in certain areas before World War II, this was not the case with tanks or armor tactics

When J. While the army was forward-looking in certain areas before World War II, this was not the case with tanks or armor tactics. In 1919, in the drawdown of . forces following World War I, the Tank Corps was abolished. The National Defense Act the next year assigned the tanks to the infantry, consistent with army belief that tanks should support attacking infantry. Tanker losses were really appalling. It is an excellent read. Jeannie Walker (Award-Winning Author) "I Saw the Light" - A True Story of a Near-Death Experience. One of the things I liked most about this book is it is a little unusual. The author does a nice job of describing the American Sherman tank and some of its draw backs as well as good aspects.Hardback or Cased Book. Condition: New. Tank Driver: With the 11th Armored from the Battle of the Bulge to Ve Day. Book. He tells about the concentration camps, the spectacle of the defeated Germans, and the dramatic encounter with Russian soldiers in Austria that marked combat's end.

item 2 Hartman-Tank Driver BOOK NEW -Hartman-Tank Driver BOOK NE. Place of Publication. Ted Hartman was 19 years old when he got behind the controls of a tank and drove it into battle

item 2 Hartman-Tank Driver BOOK NEW -Hartman-Tank Driver BOOK NEW. £1. 2. Bloomington, in. Genre. Country of Publication.

Tank Driver is the story of a young man’s combat initiation in World War II. Based on letters home, the sparse narrative has the immediacy of on-the-spot reporting. Ted Hartman was a teenager when he was sent overseas to drive a Sherman tank into combat to face the desperate German counterattack known as the Battle of the Bulge. Hartman gives a riveting account of the shifting tides of battle and the final Allied breakout. He tells about the concentration camps, the spectacle of the defeated Germans, and the dramatic encounter with Russian soldiers in Austria that marked combat’s end. This is a vivid, personal account of some of the most dramatic fighting of World War II.


Forcestalker
Tank Driver is a very enjoyable general account of one private's war in Europe. The book is a fast read but doesn't leave the reader bogged down with cumbersome statistics of difficult to follow passages.

In fact, I get the feeling this book was really an expansion on an earlier work made mostly for friends and family and later expanded into something for others to enjoy.

One of the things I liked most about this book is it is a little unusual. I've not read many accounts of American tank driers in Europe. The author does a nice job of describing the American Sherman tank and some of its draw backs as well as good aspects. I also enjoyed reading about his path through Europe and especially his time at the battle at Bastogne.

However, the book remains somewhat limited by the fact it lacks specific details. I would have liked to know more about what it was like to face battle in the tank and more about the engagements the author fought in. There is very little direct action in this book.

This book would make an excellent companion to several first person accounts of Bastogne, such as Donald Burgett's Seven Roads to Hell, or David Webster's Parachute Infantry: An American Paratrooper's Memoir of D-Day and the Fall of the Third Reich , which go into much more detail regarding the events the author was involved in supporting.
ᴜɴɪᴄᴏʀɴ
I have read a lot of books from a soldiers viewpoint, and sorry to say this is one of the most boring story tellings I have ever read. This book absolutely does not convey the sacrifice,agony and horror of war at all. He describes very little of any battles he was involved in, choosing not to give many details on anything. Mr. Hartman is without a doubt a real military hero, unfortunately he is not a very good author. I would look for another book on this subject and pass on this one.
Celore
Hartman was a PFC with the 41st Battalion, B Company of the 11th Armored Div and saw action from the end of the Bulge battle to the very end of the war. The book is significant by its mere existence. I know of very few books by American tankers. The book is well written and covers from his indoctrination through home coming and even his revisiting Belgium in later years.
Hartman was a M4 Sherman driver and tank commander (although he was initially given the choice of being a driver or a gunner). Unfortunately his details on his many combat actions are light. But he does give a few interesting glimpses into the life of a U.S. tanker.
-He was on the Sherman the whole time but he never details what variants along the way. One picture in the books shows him on a M4A3E8 at the end of the war. He does mention going from the 75mm Sherman to the 76mm during his Bulge actions. He also notes that his battalion got four Pershings (one per company) in April 1945, just before the end of the war. Because no one was familiar with them they were stuck in the back of the column. He said folks felt better knowing the limitations of the Sherman. Although, he does note they wish they had the Pershing during the Bulge fighting. Hartman comments on the great reliability of the Sherman throughout the book and notes the German tanks "lumbered along at a snail's pace compared to ours."
-Tanker losses were really appalling. In nine months of combat the 11th Armored Div suffered 48.1% casualties during the war with 614 killed (out of about 12,000 men in the Div). His 41st Battalion suffered 68 killed (about 11%) and his Company B suffered 23 killed (about 20%). What is amazing is the high loss of officers and tank commanders. His company commander was killed within minutes of their first action and in the nine months I think they went through three or four COs (one at least was wounded and returned later). He only seems to comment on a couple of bad platoon leaders. He lost numerous tank commanders either directly or as they left to fill other vacancies. In the Forward of the book, Spencer Tucker states that the 3rd Armored Div suffered 580% casualties of its tanks (either destroyed or 'knocked-out') and that the U.S. lost 6,000 tanks in Europe during the war.
-Hartman comments on the poor performance of the 75mm gun and that they had to get rear shots on the German tanks. "The German gun had fired an armor-piercing projectile that entered the turret, killed all three men, and then exited the other side. We knew the German 88 was extremely powerful, but this was devastating to see. We were later able to measure the distance from which it had been fired-1,700 yards, almost a mile!" What is most notable though is the low number of actual tank vs tank actions (at least that he describes). What seemed to cause the most tank loses were panzershreck attacks (the author always says panzershreck or even bazooka but who knows if this was strictly true or if he did not differentiate among panzerfaust, etc.). Snipers also killed a number of his comrades.
-The author describes working very frequently with armored infantry troops and how often a couple troops would ride on the back deck of the tank to spot enemy infantry and AT units. He also talks about how `Art' (a call sign), the Piper Cub spotter plane, would fly overhead and call down artillery on enemy positions and even help give them driving directions through towns. Art also called in tactical air cover and Hartman comments on P-47s firing rockets at the enemy. He mentions at least a couple of occasions when the tankers would act as or support infantry clearing houses.
Malaris
Letters home from a 19-year-old helped the author, Dr. J. Ted Hartman, reconstruct his experiences as a tank driver during the battle of the bulge. I think this is a must-read for any WW II history buff. It was especially interesting for me because I know this great man personally and my half-brother was an infantryman in that same battle. Perhaps their paths crossed.
MilsoN
I really enjoyed this book. The author describes tank combat in WW2 very vividly. It contains good illustrations. This book is definately worth adding to the library of any WW2 buff.
Kipabi
Yesterday, we buried another dedicated man who served in World War Two and was part of the infantry at the Battle of the Bulge. His motto was GOD BLESS AMERICA!
I wish there were more memoirs written that describe the horrors of war. Any citizen who didn’t have to serve or experience what these courageous patriots went through should read every book they can get on the subject.
The author, J. Ted Hartman takes us with him on his riveting account, so get ready for the dramatic encounter as we shift the tides of battle.
It is an excellent read.
Jeannie Walker (Award-Winning Author) "I Saw the Light" - A True Story of a Near-Death Experience
Urtte
I know Dr. Hartman personally and he is one of the nicest people one could ever meet. I am 34 and was introduced to him by a mutual friend who knew I enjoyed reading WWII books. His story is well written, as he took his time to recall his account, revisiting his personal resources like old campaign maps and personal letters home from the front. His attitude is emblematic of many in his generation -- positive, upbeat, and ultimately, humble. His book is a true account of a young man, who like so many others his age, put down their hopes and dreams to go overseas and put down the monster that was on the loose in WWII. His account of being in a Sherman tank from late 1944 to the Spring of 1945 is rare to find to the extent that he was in the Battle of Bulge, traveled extremely far for a US tanker in combat, and battled some truly full strength, fresh, yet elite tanker units like Panzer Lehr. I would highly recommend this book to any student of WWII.