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by Alan Pell Crawford
Download Unwise Passions : A True Story of a Remarkable Woman and the First Great Scandal of 18th Century America fb2
Leaders & Notable People
  • Author:
    Alan Pell Crawford
  • ISBN:
    068483474X
  • ISBN13:
    978-0684834740
  • Genre:
  • Publisher:
    Simon & Schuster (November 15, 2000)
  • Pages:
    336 pages
  • Subcategory:
    Leaders & Notable People
  • Language:
  • FB2 format
    1925 kb
  • ePUB format
    1379 kb
  • DJVU format
    1550 kb
  • Rating:
    4.4
  • Votes:
    808
  • Formats:
    mbr azw lrf lrf


Alan Pell Crawford is the author of Thunder on the Right: The "New Right" . The book spends a great deal of time following other characters that are not directly related to the case.

Alan Pell Crawford is the author of Thunder on the Right: The "New Right" and the Politics of Resentment, which The New Republic called "a significant work of political and intellectual history.

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Unwise Passions book. Start by marking Unwise Passions: A True Story of a Remarkable Woman and the First Great Scandal of Eighteenth-Century America as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read. Unwise Passions: A True Story of a Remarkable Woman and the First Great Scandal of Eighteenth-Century America. by. Alan Pell Crawford.

In Unwise Passions, Alan Pell Crawford recounts one of the archetypal stories of American and British history and literature: a beautiful young girl and an unhappily married man, in whose house she resides, become sexually involved with the expected results. Depending on the local spin on the tale, a rake seduces an innocent maiden or a strumpet leads an honorable man astray. But whoever initiates the affair, the woman's reputation is ruined, and that was the fate of Anne Cary (Nancy) Randolph in late eighteenth-century Virginia.

The title of Alan Pell Crawford’s new book might seem more appropriate for a romance novel than a work of history. But the reader doesn’t have to wade too far into this tempestuous tale to realize that nineteenth-century novels, with their ardor, intrigue, villainy, and hurly-burly, are hardly exaggerations. The story here recounts the fate of a young Virginia woman accused of giving birth to a child sired by her sister’s husband, murdering the newborn, and then becoming the paramour of a plantation slave.

Alan Pell Crawford discusses his book Alan Pell Crawford discussed his book Unwise Passions: A True Story of a Remarkable Woman and the First Great.

Alan Pell Crawford discussed his book Unwise Passions: A True Story of a Remarkable Woman and the First Great Scandal of Eighteenth-Century America, published by Simon and Schuster.

It is the true story of the privileged and pampered children of the new country's .

It is the true story of the privileged and pampered children of the new country's aristocratic families as they struggle to find their place in an increasingly democratic America, where their values and position in society are under siege. Above all, it is the story of the indomitable Nancy Randolph, who is hounded out of Virginia by a scandal that will haunt her and everyone she loves for the rest of their lives. Alan Pell Crawford is the author of Thunder on the Right: The "New Right" and The Politics of Resentment, which The New Republic called "a significant work of political and intellectual history.

Alan Pell Crawford is a former . history, politics, and culture for The Wall Street Journal since 1993.

A True Story of a Remarkable Woman-and the First Great Scandal of Eighteenth-Century America. by Alan Pell Crawford. On September 16, 1774, Nancy Randolph was born into one of the most powerful families in colonial Virginia. She grew up with all the privileges of the gentry, and all the expectations, too.

Join Museum staff and fellow readers in learning more about the true story of an 18th-century murder, intertwined with the lives of the founding fathers. Drop in to participate!

The author revists the eighteenth-century "Jezebel of Virginia" case to recreate one of the most sensational trials in American history in which Nancy Randolph, a young woman from one of the wealthiest and most socially prominent families in Virginia, played a key role in the murder trial of her brother-in-law, who was accused of fathering and killing an illegitimate child. 20,000 first printing.

Abuseyourdna
A lurid tale of 18th Century America incorporating a number of the famous names of Founding history: John Marshall, Patrick Henry, Gouverneur Morris, John (Jack) Randolph and Thomas Jefferson. Unintended pregnancy and subsequent infanticide find way to trial in a Cumberland County Courthouse, Virginia in 1791. The story has great potential and does manage to entice across many pages, but in total suffers from a melodramatic (exaggerated and sensationalized) hand of the author and a tendency to mix too many characters, or to mix them at a pace faster than the read can sustain. Some amount of confusion will distract, as the many Randolphs and plantation neighbors, even Jeffersons, pass through the story with minimal introduction, or purpose and no subsequent reminders.

The facts are very loosely wrapped within the embellishments and extrapolations. There are NO end-notes to anchor the facts to reality. Author Allen Pell Crawford does provide a list of notes in the afterward portion of the book - but it is (apparently) up to the reader to correlate quotes within the text to their source in the notes section. This is a technique that has been used before, so it is not unique, but rarely if ever in serious history. The reader is left to wonder if the story might not work without a serious measure of author "interpolation" between the fixed points of historical fact... and so scholarly citations are kept in back un-noted, less likely to contradict, or embarrass with a void.

An early passage intended to establish Henry's success as an attorney goes far afield of the facts (or the renditions common to other accounts) when Crawford overly dramatizes Henry's examination for the bar in 1760 by John Randolph. Crawford writes, "For what seemed like hours, John of Tazewell Hall bombarded the tavern keeper [Henry] with questions of every aspect of the common law, the more abstruse the better. When the interrogation was complete (or Randolph tired of the game), he waggled his head back and forth, chuckled and swore he would never trust appearances again." (pg. 21)

Far from the impressive presentation Crawford imagines, Henry performed VERY poorly and is ultimately admitted to the bar ONLY by badgering his examiners. Thomas Jefferson recounts, "There were four examiners, --Wythe, Pendleton, Peyton Randolph and John Randolph. Wythe and Pendleton at once rejected his [Henry's] application; the two Randolphs were, by his importunity, prevailed upon to sign the license; and having obtained their signatures, he again applied to Pendleton and after much entreaty and many promises of future study, succeeded in obtaining his." This from a source listed within Crawford's notes (Patrick Henry, pg. 23, by Moses Coit Tyler) - yet he chooses not to use it. John Bailey in, Jefferson's Second Father..., pg. 50, writes, "Even Henry's worshipful biographer, William Writ, conceded that, 'Henry was woefully deficient as a lawyer.' As someone who had served his country as attorney general (1817-29), Writ was surely well placed to judge."

Henry's great success as a trial lawyer was his dramatic oratory, never his extensive knowledge of the law. The point itself is nuance in Crawford's story but its stark difference with well established history is disturbing and one that puts an early strain on the credibility of the conclusions & interpolations that follow. In the end... a book worth the read; but better on the strength of is entertainment rather than its instruction.
Milleynti
This is an excellent book with pretty detailed information about the Randolph family. It has an excellent family tree listed in the front. It is especially interesting to me since I come from a long line of Randolph's on my father's side that I believe were from the Turkey Island Randolph's and so I may very well be related to her.
Ynneig
I'm a big fan of historical non-fiction but, I have to admit that I picked up this book with some hesitation. I wasn't so sure that I would enjoy the American historical aspects this book offered because my tastes generally run to the British Victorian era. Imagine my surprise when I found it to be quite a lovely book (in spite of the story) that turned out to be immensely readable and very interesting.

Initially Nancy Randolph seems a bit naive and a little short on the ability to stand up for herself after being involved in a terrible scandal, but by the end she proves to be the most stable and competent member of her extended family. The protaganist, Jack Randolph, deals with the demons of alcohol and opium abuse (and perhaps some sort of mental illness) by lashing out at the only person who can't/won't fight back. Eventually she does begin her retribution and, while it fails to completely destry Jack, it does provide some long-awaited satisfaction.

The story includes Thomas Jefferson, his daughter, Patsy, and other recognizable historical people which makes this tale even more interesting. I highly recommend this book for anyone who reads historical non-fiction.
PC-rider
I was surprised to find this book a page turner, I stayed up late to keep reading "just one more chapter". Details the events surrounding a life changing incident in an early American political family, and the fallout & scandal that followed the players 20 plus years later. In the meantime, this family is closely involved with the creating and sustaining of the new democracy - there are a few quite colorful characters.

The book gave me an interesting view to how early American politics worked, family and everyday life in early America. I believe the author did a good job of creating a quick paced plot with good historical documentation.

How the scandal was handled by the players involved reveals their characters; and this reminded me that people haven't changed all that much in 200+ years.
MilsoN
{Spoilers} This book wasn't exactly what I expected. It read more like a history of the time period in general; rather than the case. Actually, the trial is over and one of the main characters dead before half the book is finished. The book spends a great deal of time following other characters that are not directly related to the case. Overall, this book is great if you are interested in the time Revolutionary time period in general.