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by B. H. Liddell Hart
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Historical
  • Author:
    B. H. Liddell Hart
  • ISBN:
    0306803542
  • ISBN13:
    978-0306803543
  • Genre:
  • Publisher:
    Da Capo Press; Reprint edition (March 22, 1989)
  • Pages:
    460 pages
  • Subcategory:
    Historical
  • Language:
  • FB2 format
    1439 kb
  • ePUB format
    1457 kb
  • DJVU format
    1432 kb
  • Rating:
    4.7
  • Votes:
    456
  • Formats:
    rtf mbr txt doc


Lawrence of arabia by b. h. liddell hart illustrated with maps and photographs .

LAWRENCE OF ARABIA BY B. LIDDELL HART ILLUSTRATED WITH MAPS AND PHOTOGRAPHS Library. It is reprinted by arrangement with the Estate of B. Liddell Hart. Published by Da Capo Press, Inc. A member of the Perseus Books Group.

Captain Basil Henry Liddell Hart (1895-1970) was one of the foremost military theorists of our time. Series: Da Capo Paperback. Start reading Lawrence Of Arabia (Da Capo Paperback) on your Kindle in under a minute. Don't have a Kindle? Get your Kindle here, or download a FREE Kindle Reading App.

Sir Basil Henry Liddell Hart (31 October 1895 – 29 January 1970), commonly known throughout most of his career as Captain B. Liddell Hart, was a British soldier, military historian and military theorist. In the 1920s and later he wrote a series of military histories that proved influential among strategists. He argued that frontal assault was a strategy that was bound to fail at great cost in lives, as happened in 1914–1918.

Captain Basil Henry Liddell Hart (1895–1970) was one of the foremost military theorists of our time. Publisher: Da Capo Press (June 16, 2009). This is a great analysis of the Lawrence's career in battle. It explains the military significance of Lawrence's actions, places those actions in historical context, and gives the reader a bigger picture of the campaign by detailing the other forces' actions. Of course, Liddell Hart is an excellent writer and the prose is great.

Lawrence of Arabia book. Sir Basil Henry Liddell Hart usually known before his knighthood as Captain B. Liddell Hart was an English soldier, military historian and leading inter-war theorist. Mor. rivia About Lawrence of Arabia.

The esteemed military historian B. Liddell Hart wrote this study of Lawrence . Библиографические данные.

He discussed Lawrence's Oxford days, his experiences as an intelligence officer in Egypt, and in particular the tactics of guerrilla warfare he practiced so effectively against the large Turkish armies during World War I. Liddell Hart was one of the few to give Lawrence his full justice as both a man and a brilliant soldier.

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An intensely interesting book

An intensely interesting book. T. E. Shaw, better known as Lawrence of Arabia, was one of the most romantic, heroic, and enigmatic figures of his day. The subject of myth and hagiography, he was equally accomplished in several fields-as archaeologist, diplomat, writer, and soldier-and he worked throughout World War I and after in the Middle East in efforts to promote independent Arab states. His autobiography Seven Pillars of Wisdom is one of the greatest works of its kind.

He discussed Lawrence’s Oxford days, his experiences as an intelligence officer in Egypt, and in particular the tactics of guerrilla warfare he practiced so effectively against the large Turkish armies during World War I.

B H Liddell Hart; Giles Lauren. Historical Books Da Capo. Showing 21 of 21 results that match your query. Product - A Greater Than Napoleon : Scipio Africanus.

T. E. Shaw, better known as Lawrence of Arabia, was one of the most romantic, heroic, and enigmatic figures of his day. The subject of myth and hagiography, he was equally accomplished in several fields--as archaeologist, diplomat, writer, and soldier--and he worked throughout World War I and after in the Middle East in efforts to promote independent Arab states. His autobiography Seven Pillars of Wisdom is one of the greatest works of its kind. The esteemed military historian B. H. Liddell Hart wrote this study of Lawrence in order to pierce the clouds of legend. He discussed Lawrence's Oxford days, his experiences as an intelligence officer in Egypt, and in particular the tactics of guerrilla warfare he practiced so effectively against the large Turkish armies during World War I. Liddell Hart was one of the few to give Lawrence his full justice as both a man and a brilliant soldier. Long out-of-print, this book unravels the many puzzling features of Lawrence's story and restores him to his proper place as one of the twentieth century's heroic, but very human, figures.

Malann
T.T Lawrence was Capt. Basil Liddell Hart's friend. Capt. Liddell Hart was described in military circles as "The captain that generals listened to". He was a military scholar and strategist in the mould of Clausewitz. He along with J.F.C. Fuller defined and solidified the modern British school of military history writing. It is Liddell Hart quality writing writing above pomposity and rigor. As good as it gets and among the pantheon of great military writing. It would seem a bit unbalanced now as the book is a laudatory biography of a hero that comes once in millenium. Today the critics would take it apart and describe such writing as churlish however I think that we are removed now a hundred years out since the events in this book have occurred and therefore modern criticisms would seem equally ludicrous to me to cast the book in modern light. Nonetheless it is a valuable document beyond dispute as it is an account of a great man who told his account directly to another great of the same era. That is of important consideration. I think that there is another book (probably now only exists in the British Library in London for that is where I read it) that is an account Lawrence gave and is narrated to print by Robert Graves. The days of the great books are over, the days of great British writing is long past, the days of great writing is over as are the days where great men abounded. Books such as this really are the last embers of the finest examples of British writing, written in an English that must best be described as classical scholarship
Zut
Excellent! Loved every page, but then again I'm a fan. Hart's treatment of the enigmatic Lawrence was a pleasure to follow. I much preferred it to the "Lawrence IN Arabia." Currently reading Michael Korda's,"HERO: The Life and Legend of Lawrence of Arabia" and it, too, is very pleasurable reading. The best of all the Lawrence books is the "Authorized Biography of T E Lawrence" by Jeremy Wilson. B H Lidell Hart's is a close second.
Anicasalar
Great perspective in the first person by one if my favorite military writers..
LiTTLe_NiGGa_in_THE_СribE
good
Halloween
Written by England's foremost military theorist, Basil Liddel Hart's biography provides the first "serious" biography of TE Lawrence. Despite his sober bearings and reputation, Liddell Hart proves no less susceptible to hero worship than his predecessors.

The balance of Liddell Hart's book analyzes Lawrence's military campaigns. Liddell Hart views Lawrence as a brilliant leader, worthy of comparison to "great captains" like Clausewitz, Napoleon and Marlborough. Using minimal resources against a numerically and technologically superior foe, Lawrence "turn(ed) the weakness of the Arabs into an asset, and the strength of the Turks into a debit" (383).

Liddell Hart draws uncritically on Lawrence's writings, often to the point of paraphrase. But his strategic and tactical analysis frequently proves unassailable. Consider his analysis of Lawrence's most famous military achievement: (pp. 166-167)

"Tactically, the Aqaba operation had inflicted a permanent loss of some 1,200 men... on the Turks - at a cost of two men killed in the conquering force... By the strictest canons of orthodox strategy... it was an unrivaled achievement. The British forces in trying unsuccessfully to capture Gaza [under Murray]... had only succeeded in killing or capturing 1,700 Turks at a permanent cost to themselves of 3,000 men... They had sacrificed roughly two men to kill one Turk, the same number that the Arabs sacrificed to kill 1,200 Turks!"

Liddell Hart broods on Lawrence's interlude at Wadi Ais, one of Seven Pillars' more dubious passages. Liddell Hart takes it at face value, marveling at Lawrence formulating "a new theory of irregular warfare" (138) while racked with fever. He emphasizes Lawrence's campaign against the Hejaz Railway, but downplays the Royal Navy's decisive role in capturing Wejh. He views Lawrence's ephemeral victory at Tafileh as a "gem" (215), while skimming over his failed 1918 Dead Sea Campaign. The Arabs become a feverish mass, indecisive until Lawrence prods them into action.

While Liddell Hart's personal views shape his portrait (both his friendship with Lawrence and advocacy of indirect strategy), his analysis is shrewd. It's possible to overstate Lawrence's tactical achievements, but he undeniably influenced military theory: guerrilla leaders from Orde Wingate to Vo Nguyen Giap drew inspiration from Seven Pillars, while American troops in Afghanistan and Iraq study Lawrence's 27 Articles. Those scoffing at the small number of Arabs joining King Hussein's revolt miss the point of asymmetrical warfare, so beautifully elucidated by Liddell Hart. For minimal casualties and lucre, the Arab Revolt provided the British an extremely useful sideshow.

Liddell Hart proves less shrewd otherwise analyzing his subject. He seems just as credulous to Lawrence's tall tales and evasions as Thomas or Graves. He sketches Lawrence's early years thinly, omitting Lawrence's illegitimacy or tense relationship with his mother. Even this early in Lawrence literature, inconsistencies emerge. For one, Lawrence's pre-war ambush by a Syrian bandit (9) differs significantly from Graves: in this telling, Lawrence thwarts the bandit by dissembling his pistol. More notably, Liddell Hart downplays Lawrence's complicity in the Tafas Massacre (287-288), when Lawrence himself is shockingly forthright.

Liddell Hart notes Lawrence's artistic interests, highlighting his "process of swift mental appreciation" (12), "extraordinary charm" (13) and "ha[ving] an instinctive shyness born of a sense of difference" (258). He relates amusing anecdotes like Lawrence's confronting an imposter: "Had he stuck to his statement I should have begun to question myself," says his subject (369). There's also his passage on Lawrence's postwar military service, finding "a sense of fulfillment, reinforced by a sense of futility" in being a gentleman ranker (330), and proving rare in 'adjusting his opinions to his knowledge" (375). These passages provide valuable insight into Lawrence's personality.

But Liddell Hart's views of Lawrence often prove simplistic or worse. The author's "reasoned belief in the benefits of British administration" (309) distorts Lawrence's efforts at Paris and Cairo to reconcile British, French and Arab war aims. Nor can we credit his view of Lawrence as a "Crusader" (374), a melodramatic flash out of Lowell Thomas. When all else fails, Liddell Hart falls back on starry-eyed hagiography. He melodramatically ends by announcing that "in [Lawrence] the Spirit of Freedom came incarnate to a world in fetters" (390), a messiah cut down in his prime.

This passage points up T.E. Lawrence in Arabia and After's primary shortcoming. Liddell Hart the historian can scrutinize Lawrence's campaigns with clarity and insight. But Liddell Hart the man can't see Lawrence as anything but a friend, seemingly lacking guile or fault. The resulting tome merely cocoons the Lawrence myth in a scholarly patina, begging for skeptics to bust it open.
Shem
Sir Liddel-Hart knew TE personally and admired him greatly. Liddel-Hart began this work as a general work on the Arab revolt but ended up waxing poetic about his longtime friend and hero. At times it may be a bit too gushing but the fact that TE was an incredible individual is without dispute and Sir Liddel Hart would not be the first to succumb to hero-worship. TE Lawrence's story is one with many lessons about a people who have grown weary with being ignored by the world. TE Lawrence saw himself as a savior of sorts for such peoples in the Arab world. His contributions to irregular warfare are numerous and Sir Liddel Hart is the perfect choice to bring those lessons to us in describing the life of Lawrence. The language is grand and sweeping making it an easy and enjoyable read while telling us much about the life and campaigns of TE Lawrence. A great resource for anyone interested in his life or in his contributions to military history.
Saimath
I strongly recommend this book. Unlike most of the bio related books you can read on Lawrence, this one is dedicated to how he waged war (and written by an expert in warfare). Lawrence's methods were so advanced that they resonate to this day. For example, he developed methods of system disruption that incapactitated a "modern" army and threw an empire into disorder. You can see these methods in play today in modern Iraq. Well worth the time you spend.
While not the best biography on the subject (that honor would go to John Mack's A Prince of Our Disorder), this account, while laudatory in the extreme, has the advantage of having been written by someone who actually knew Lawrence, and who had his subject's input. If it sound at times like a Boy's Own Adventure volume, it also has the immediacy which many other accounts lack, and one gets the feeling that Liddell Hart harbored a deep admiration for his subject.