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by Oyama Shiro,Edward Fowler
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Historical
  • Author:
    Oyama Shiro,Edward Fowler
  • ISBN:
    080144375X
  • ISBN13:
    978-0801443756
  • Genre:
  • Publisher:
    Cornell University Press; 1 edition (August 11, 2005)
  • Pages:
    160 pages
  • Subcategory:
    Historical
  • Language:
  • FB2 format
    1798 kb
  • ePUB format
    1400 kb
  • DJVU format
    1971 kb
  • Rating:
    4.9
  • Votes:
    785
  • Formats:
    docx lrf lrf mobi


A Man With No Talents is the story of an "everyday" Japanese man (normal upbringing, family, education etc) .

A Man With No Talents is the story of an "everyday" Japanese man (normal upbringing, family, education etc) who follows the salaryman route - college, job @ some firm. Oyama takes us on a journey into a harsh world and introduces the many characters he lives and works with each day. I know very little about Japanese culture, however, the translator does a good job of filling the reader in on specific elements that would otherwise be lost in translation (with a series of notes).

A Man with No Talents book. the author is a man who worked as a day laborer in tokyo. he'd done so for 13 years before he penned this book. San'ya, Tokyo's largest day-laborer quarter and the only one. and it wasn't some misfortune or a lost job that landed him in that position-he chose it quite freely despite other opportunities. he'd had "normal" jobs for years, and decided that he just wasn't made for the salaryman life.

San'ya, Tokyo's largest day-laborer quarter and the only one with lodgings, had been Oyama Shiro's home for twelve years when he took up his pen and began writing about his life as a resident of Tokyo's most notorious neighborhood. After completing a university education, Oyama entered the business workforce and appeared destined to walk the same path as many a "salaryman. A singular temperament and a deep loathing of conformity, however, altered his career trajectory dramatically. Oyama left his job and moved to Osaka, where he lived for three years

Oyama Shiro, Edward Fowler.

Oyama Shiro, Edward Fowler. San'ya, Tokyo's largest day-laborer quarter and the only one with lodgings, had been Oyama Shiro's home for twelve years when he took up his pen and began writing about his life as a resident of Tokyo's most notorious neighborhood.

San'ya, Tokyo's largest day-laborer quarter and the only one with lodgings, had been Oyama Shiro's home for twelve years when he took up his pen and began writing.

Authors: Oyama Shiro Edward Fowler

Authors: Oyama Shiro Edward Fowler. Details about A Man with No Talents: San'ya, Tokyo's largest day-laborer quarter and the only one with lodgings, had been Oyama Shiro's home for twelve years when he took up his pen and began writing about his life as a resident of Tokyo's most notorious neighborhood. The book was published in Japan in 2000 after Oyama had submitted his manuscript?on a lark, he confesses?for one of Japan's top literary awards, the Kaiko Takeshi Prize.

Oyama Shiro is not merely a close observer and a good writer. He is a highly intelligent individual. Moving according to convention through the life stages of a postwar Japanese male, Oyama finished high school and completed a four-year course at a Japanese university

Oyama Shiro is not merely a close observer and a good writer. Moving according to convention through the life stages of a postwar Japanese male, Oyama finished high school and completed a four-year course at a Japanese university. He then entered a white-collar firm and embarked on a proper work career. He finally dropped out of the corporate rat race completely to sink into the world of casual labor

Find many great new & used options and get the best deals for A Man with No Talents . Get it by Fri, 17 Jan - Sat, 18 Jan from UK, United Kingdom. Publisher Date:-2005-08-11. Read full description.

Get it by Fri, 17 Jan - Sat, 18 Jan from UK, United Kingdom.

Shiro Oyama, A Man with No Talents: Memoirs of a Tokyo Day Laborer, trans. Edward Fowler (Ithaca: Cornell University Press, 2005 ). A more literal translation of the Japanese title (San’ya gakeppuchi nikki) would be Diary on the precipice in San’ya. As far as is known, A Man with No Talents is the only work Oyama has published. 4. Edward Fowler, San’ya Blues: Laboring Life in Contemporary Tokyo (Ithaca: Cornell University Press, 1996), 3. oogle Scholar

Founded in 1997, BookFinder. Coauthors & Alternates. Learn More at LibraryThing. Oyama Shiro at LibraryThing.

San'ya, Tokyo's largest day-laborer quarter and the only one with lodgings, had been Oyama Shiro's home for twelve years when he took up his pen and began writing about his life as a resident of Tokyo's most notorious neighborhood. After completing a university education, Oyama entered the business workforce and appeared destined to walk the same path as many a "salaryman." A singular temperament and a deep loathing of conformity, however, altered his career trajectory dramatically. Oyama left his job and moved to Osaka, where he lived for three years. Later he returned to the corporate world but fell out of it again, this time for good. After spending a short time on the streets around Shinjuku, home to Tokyo's bustling entertainment district, he moved to San'ya in 1987, at the age of forty.

Oyama acknowledges his eccentricity and his inability to adapt to corporate life. Spectacularly unsuccessful as a salaryman yet uncomfortable in his new surroundings, he portrays himself as an outsider both from mainstream society and from his adopted home. It is precisely this outsider stance, however, at once dispassionate yet deeply engaged, that caught the eye of Japanese readers. The book was published in Japan in 2000 after Oyama had submitted his manuscript―on a lark, he confesses―for one of Japan's top literary awards, the Kaiko Takeshi Prize. Although he was astounded actually to win the award, Oyama remained in character and elected to preserve the anonymity that has freed him from all social bonds and obligations. The Cornell edition contains a new afterword by Oyama regarding his career since his inadvertent brush with fame.


Orll
It's really a shame that this book doesn't get more love on Amazon. I don't think I've ever encountered anything quite like it. The story of a true societal outcast, set in San'ya near the end of the Japanese bubble economy of the 80's. I think any person who is interested in Japanese history/culture and has ever felt alienated from society would be wise to pick this one up.
Cesar
Interesting to learn of a lifestyle unknown to most American readers; but the thin volume ultimately bored me to the point that I did not finish it.
Onath
I picked this book up from the library after having glanced @ it when searching for another book. It turned out to be a very interesting read. A Man With No Talents is the story of an "everyday" Japanese man (normal upbringing, family, education etc) who follows the salaryman route - college, job @ some firm. But @ 40 yrs old, prior to following the next steps of that path - marriage/children, realized that this life wasn't for him. It seems he's always had a sense that this was the case & made the decision to live in a bunk house and work as a day laborer. Oyama takes us on a journey into a harsh world and introduces the many characters he lives and works with each day. I know very little about Japanese culture, however, the translator does a good job of filling the reader in on specific elements that would otherwise be lost in translation (with a series of notes). Oyama describes a world where, in order to gain entry, one must learn the tangled ropes of the bureaucratic employment agencies and street hustlers, getting up at 2 or 3 in the am prior to 12 hrs of construction work. Interestingly the author maintains that he's grateful to live in a country such as Japan where he was able to make the decision to live a life that, although not easy or pleasant, is one he prefers. This book offers a glance into the "other side" and answers the question many of us wonder - "how did this person arrive @ this point in life". The answer is not as straightforward as one would think. An integral part of the story is the dilemma of aging in the the day laborer world. Of course construction work becomes more difficult as a person ages, but Oyama describes for the reader exactly what the process is for an older worker and how he & his colleagues and bunk mates handle their new reality. The decisions they each arrive @ are what stayed with me after putting the book down.