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by Roland Perry
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Historical
  • Author:
    Roland Perry
  • ISBN:
    030681482X
  • ISBN13:
    978-0306814822
  • Genre:
  • Publisher:
    Da Capo Press (June 13, 2006)
  • Pages:
    416 pages
  • Subcategory:
    Historical
  • Language:
  • FB2 format
    1302 kb
  • ePUB format
    1401 kb
  • DJVU format
    1349 kb
  • Rating:
    4.3
  • Votes:
    896
  • Formats:
    docx doc docx mobi


The most damaging spy network of the Cold War, the infamous Cambridge Spy Ring, comprised several influential .

The most damaging spy network of the Cold War, the infamous Cambridge Spy Ring, comprised several influential British citizens-and one American. Whitney Straight, an agent of SIS, according to Perry, suspected his brother Michael in 1950, one year before Burgess and Maclean defected, an event that brought down Philby and the rest of the Cambridge ring.

Includes bibliographical references (p. 379-382) and index. Part one: To the manor born. Destiny dictator ; Birth, death and circumstance ; Marx and sparks ; Cambridge consolidation ; In the ring ; Graduate in the art of deception - Part two: Our man in Washington. Green spy ; The informants ; A defensive measure ; New republic, old ways - Part three: Cold War conflict.

The most damaging spy network of the Cold War-the Cambridge Spy Ring-was comprised of several powerful . Professor Roland Perry (born 11 October 1946) is a Melbourne-based author best known for his books on history, especially Australia in the two world wars

The most damaging spy network of the Cold War-the Cambridge Spy Ring-was comprised of several powerful & influential British citizens & one American, Michael Straight. Professor Roland Perry (born 11 October 1946) is a Melbourne-based author best known for his books on history, especially Australia in the two world wars. His Monash: The Outsider Who Won The War, won the Fellowship of Australian Writers' 'Melbourne University Publishing Award' in 2004. The judges described it as 'a model of the biographer's art.

Also by roland perry. The life of michael straight. The only american in britain’s cambridge spy ring. Michael Whitney Straight was always going to be different from the rest of the Cambridge University ring of spies recruited by Russian intelligence in the 1930s. First, he was the only American among a group otherwise boasting British backgrounds. Second, he was the wealthiest. And third, he was the most ambitious.

The most damaging spy network of the Cold War, the infamous Cambridge Spy Ring, comprised several influential British citizens-and one American, Michael Straight

The most damaging spy network of the Cold War, the infamous Cambridge Spy Ring, comprised several influential British citizens-and one American, Michael Straight. While a student at Cambridge University in the 1930s, Straight fell in with the circle of notorious spies, including the infamous Kim Philby. For the next several decades, Michael Straight led the secret life of a secret agent: While working at the State Department, he passed intelligence reports to a Russian agent; while running his family's magazine, The New Republic, he funded several Communist fronts; and while serving .

Who was Michael Straight? Born into money, he spent his adult life jet setting around the globe, hobnobbing with the . Perry lacks hard evidence and what proof does exist usually favors Straight's claim.

Who was Michael Straight? Born into money, he spent his adult life jet setting around the globe, hobnobbing with the rich and powerful. He even wrote three novels.

Born into a wealthy New England family, Straight went to Cambridge University in the 1930s, where he fell in with a notorious circle of friends who were already working for Soviet Intelligence: Guy Burgess, Don Maclean. Anthony Blunt, and Kirn Philby. For 40 years, while he worked in the State Department, ran The New Republic magazine, and worked for Presidents John F. Kennedy and Richard M. Nixon, Straight was also a KGB agent.

The most damaging spy network of the Cold War?the infamous Cambridge Spy Ring?was comprised of several .

The most damaging spy network of the Cold War?the infamous Cambridge Spy Ring?was comprised of several powerful and influential British citizens?and one American,. 2. Meeting with his soviet handler. 3. Dining with the Roosevelts.

All Books eBooks Audio Books DVDs LEGO Pop Vinyls Toys & Games. Last of the Cold War Spies: The Life of Michael Straight-The Only American in Britain's Cambridge Spy Ring. Description taken from 9780306814280.

The most damaging spy network of the Cold War—the infamous Cambridge Spy Ring—was comprised of several powerful and .

The most damaging spy network of the Cold War—the infamous Cambridge Spy Ring—was comprised of several powerful and influential British citizens—and one American, Michael Straight. Born to a wealthy New England family, Straight attended Cambridge University in the 1930s, and there he fell in with the notorious circle of young men working for Soviet intelligence —Guy Burgess, Donald Maclean, Anthony Blunt, and Kim Philby, who was to become the most famous spy of the century. For the next several decades, Michael Straight led a secret life: While.

The most damaging spy network of the Cold War, the infamous Cambridge Spy Ring, comprised several influential British citizens-and one American, Michael Straight. While a student at Cambridge University in the 1930s, Straight fell in with the circle of notorious spies, including the infamous Kim Philby. For the next several decades, Michael Straight led the secret life of a secret agent: While working at the State Department, he passed intelligence reports to a Russian agent; while running his family's magazine, The New Republic, he funded several Communist fronts; and while serving U.S. presidents, he continued to meet with Soviet agents around the world. Despite Straight's 1963 "confession" to the F.B.I. that his covert activity ceased in 1941, investigative journalist and author Roland Perry has unearthed a different story-the full and complete portrait of Michael Straight, last of the Cold War spies.

Brajind
Roland Perry's "Last of the Cold War Spies" is certainly a good read. In relating the story of Michael Straight, the spy of the title, he portrays a spoiled rich young whippersnapper. Unlike his Cambridge colleagues who devoted their lives to Soviet espionage out of ideological conviction, Michael Straight seems to have bought his way into the KGB with generous capitalist donations. Indeed, Straight comes across as such a dilettante that one wonders what value he could have possibly had for that organization other than his money. Philby, it will be recalled, worked diligently in SIS; Burgess divided his efforts between the BBC and the Foreign Office, for which Maclean also toiled; Blunt was in MI5 during the war, and Cairncross worked for GC&CS and the Treasury. In other words, all of them had access to important information. Straight, according to Perry, flitted in and out of the State Department with such frequent rapidity that his access to information of interest seems at best to be ephemeral. Perhaps FDR, who ignored Straight's initial overtures for a position in government, had an insight to his character, which borders on the shallow to say the least.

I do not doubt that Straight was indeed a Soviet agent, but Perry, whose citations are a bit thin, is short on detail of what he actually accomplished for the Soviet Union. As a publisher of a patently ultra-liberal magazine, Straight did not even have a plausible cover, as the "real" Cambridge spies did. His cover story of researching a novel in the wilds of Colorado where the Government just happened to be building a secret installation makes Guy Burgess's hare-brained schemes (such as sending hot-air balloons over the grain fields in Hungary in hopes that they would catch fire) sound positively brilliant. Was the FBI of the McCarthy era really so thick that they didn't catch on to Straight before he "confessed?" For that matter, why confess at all?!

Whitney Straight, an agent of SIS, according to Perry, suspected his brother Michael in 1950, one year before Burgess and Maclean defected, an event that brought down Philby and the rest of the Cambridge ring. Perry, however, does not comment on this phenomenon. If true, it might indicate that SIS did indeed suspect Philby and his Cambridge friends by association, and subsequently set a trap for them (as Hamrick suggests in "Deceiving the Deceivers."). The author, however, sees nothing unusual in the chronology of the elder brother's suspicions.

Mr. Perry often compels his readers to undertake a leap of faith during the course of the narrative. For instance, his account of Straight's career in espionage is based on an assumption that Victor Rothschild and his wife Tess were also Soviet agents. The plausibility of such a hypothesis is founded upon their close friendship with Anthony Blunt from Cambridge days. Without any concrete documentation, however, the author seems to be pronouncing them guilty by association (rather McCarthyish!). Unlike Straight, who couldn't wait to spill the beans on both Blunt and Burgess, the Rothschilds did indeed remain friends with Anthony Blunt, even after he was publicly disgraced. Their loyalty to an old friend in adversity, however, seems commendable under the circumstances.

The Cambridge spies are said to have valued E.M. Forster's maxim, "If I had the choice of betraying my friend and betraying my country, I hope that I would have the guts to betray my country." Michael Straight seems to have had the guts to do both.
Ericaz
Met expectations. Arrived on time.
Deeroman
I grudgingly worked my way through this book because the subject was most interesting. It's about Michael Straight, a cultured, intellectual, handsome, rich, educated American who, in England before the second World War, becomes deeply involved in spreading communism and ultimately spying for Stalin. Back in the U.S. during the war, he is connected with many of the most important political figures of the day, including the Roosevelts. He held relatively high government office at times, was an editor of the New Republic (which his family owned), was deputy of the National Endowment for the Arts in the sixties, knew the Kennedy's - the list is impressive, let alone considering that during much of this period he was spying for the Russians. A most interesting, and in its own way, impressive life. The book is also real eye-opener in terms of the infiltration of Soviet agents in many areas of American government, etc, in the forties and fifties. The research was exhaustive.

However, and this is a real caveat, the writing was less than stellar. Perry was so caught up in docuenting all of Straight's connections with spies (it's as if the reader knows who all these spies were) and notable personalities of the times that he forgot to create any tension. If you're looking for a thriller, this ain't it. The writing is prosaic - there's no difference in the narrative style between his description of the manor where Straight lived in England and the fact that he might have provided the Russians and Chinese with information on U.S. military planning in Korea that led to the death of hundreds of U.S. troops. (Although it was most interesting to read about this from an historical perspective.) The writing is just plain bad in some places - it's as if the editors got tired of the book after a while (like I did), and stopped correcting obvious grammatical errors.

To sum it up - I give the book four stars for subject matter and research, and two stars for the writing.
Quellik
The subject matter is interesting and you can learn from this book, but it didn't hold my attention and it was a struggle to complete it. In most cases, no person who is able to organize, index, footnote, and complete a book of this nature should get one, two, or three stars, but a four is fair in this case. Thank you, Roland.
Atineda
The communist spy ring created in Cambridge (Philby, Maclean, Blunt, Burgess) were all British but one - Michael Straight. Straight was hansome, rich, and moved in the power circles in America. He visited Roosevelt and offered to become his personal secretary (what a job for a communist agent), but was turned down. Roosevelt instead got him a job in the State Department.

Straight entered the Army during World War II and in his 'confession' in 1963 he said that he had stopped working for the Soviets when he joined the Army. In this book Mr. Perry presents pretty good evidence that this was not true and that Straight continued to work for the KGB until at least the late 1960's, and possibly until is death in 2004.

This is a new book, exhaustively researched and contradicts Straight's own book 'After Long Silence,' especially on activities since World War II. The interested reader should read both books. Mr. Perry further speculates from time to time on activities of which there are no records. These are, however, clearly marked as speculation.