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by Nancy Dupree,Farooka Gauhari
Download Searching for Saleem: An Afghan Woman's Odyssey fb2
Historical
  • Author:
    Nancy Dupree,Farooka Gauhari
  • ISBN:
    0803221568
  • ISBN13:
    978-0803221567
  • Genre:
  • Publisher:
    University of Nebraska Press (October 28, 1996)
  • Pages:
    267 pages
  • Subcategory:
    Historical
  • Language:
  • FB2 format
    1885 kb
  • ePUB format
    1861 kb
  • DJVU format
    1230 kb
  • Rating:
    4.5
  • Votes:
    643
  • Formats:
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Farooka Gauhari tells of her desperate attempts to find out what happened to her missing husband, Saleem, and her gradual, painful decision to leave the country with her three children

Farooka Gauhari tells of her desperate attempts to find out what happened to her missing husband, Saleem, and her gradual, painful decision to leave the country with her three children.

Place of Publication. Foreword by. Nancy Dupree. 16 Photographs, 2 Illustrations, 2 Maps.

Her story typifies the kinds of human-rights violations that became common practice after the Soviet invasion and made way for the later abuses of the Taliban. Place of Publication.

book by Farooka Gauhari. Farooka Gauhari tells of her desperate attempts to find out what happened to her missing husband, Saleem, and her gradual, painful decision to leave the country with her three children.

Personal Name: Gauhari, Farooka, 1947-. Publication, Distribution, et. Lincoln Geographic Name: Afghanistan Politics and government 1973-1989. leave here couple of words about this book: Tags

Volume 29, Issue 4. November 1997, pp. 661-662. Pp. 277. Audrey C. Shalinsky (a1). Department of Anthropology, University of Wyoming, Laramie.

An Afghan woman's odyssey. 1 2 3 4 5. Want to Read. Are you sure you want to remove An Afghan woman's odyssey from your list? An Afghan woman's odyssey. Published 2004 by University of Nebraska Press in Lincoln.

Nancy Hatch Dupree (October 3, 1927 – September 10, 2017) was an American historian whose work primarily focused on the history of modern Afghanistan.

Nancy Hatch Dupree (October 3, 1927 – September 10, 2017) was an American historian whose work primarily focused on the history of modern Afghanistan

Nancy Dupree is the author of The Cultural Basis of Afghan Nationalism.

Farooka Gauhari, formerly an associate professor at Kabul University in Afghanistan, works in the department of biology at the University of Nebraska–Omaha. Nancy Dupree is the author of The Cultural Basis of Afghan Nationalism. Provides rare insight into the life of women in Kabul.

Pp. - Volume 29 Issue 4 - Audrey C. Shalinsky. Why homer was (Not) a woman: The reception of the authoress of the Odyssey. A Woman of Mission: The Religious and Cultural Odyssey of Agnes Wintemute Coates. To the Storm: The Odyssey of a Revolutionary Chinese Woman.

Farooka Gauhari tells of her desperate attempts to find out what happened to her missing husband, Saleem, and her gradual, painful decision to leave the country with her three children. In a broader sense, her story reflects the harrowing experiences of countless Afghan families: their sufferings and their struggles to maintain their identities under totalitarian rule

Searching for Saleem is a first-person account—written by a wife, mother, and professional—of a national tragedy that interrupted daily life in Afghanistan after the communist coup of April 1978. Farooka Gauhari tells of her desperate attempts to find out what happened to her missing husband, Saleem, and her gradual, painful decision to leave the country with her three children. In a broader sense, her story reflects the harrowing experiences of countless Afghan families: their sufferings and their struggles to maintain their identities under totalitarian rule. It typifies the kinds of human rights violations practiced against scores of Afghans who disappeared into dark cells or were executed without trials by successions of communist governments.


Pumpit
My great aunt wrote this book! It's a great look into life in Afghanistan before and after the Russian invasion. Also, great insight on how many afghans became refugees after the invasion
Malalrajas
Lovely book..highly recommend
Humin
"Searching for Saleem" is one of a very few books I've found about Afghani women. It takes up where "Three Women of Herat" by Veronica Doubleday leaves off. The writing is very good although not great, but it's not really the quality of the writing that makes this book so important--it's the account of life in Afghanistan. I find it amazing that there are so few books about Afghanistan! And most are for children.
After the September 11, 2001 bombings in the United States by radical Muslim terrorists, I wanted to know more about the people of Afghanistan. Morrocco was my only experience traveling in a Muslim state, and I found that Afghanistan is radically different. This book provides a rare look into the experience of one Afghani woman who seems atypical of many of the women in the country but has the facility with English and the education to provide all of us with a glimpse into a country that's playing a significant part in our lives and that seems to be a place where few Americans have lived or traveled.
nadness
This is a gripping story of one woman's attempt to cope with a world that suddenly and ominously changed around her. She and her family were living in Kabul when a coup de etat by a group of Afghan Communists plunged the country into civil war. The immediate consequnce for her was the disappearance of her husband. Along with that the social world she had known was dramatically changed. New and strange demands were placed upon her in her university job. Ordinary social and commercial concourse in the city broke down as military checkpoints interrupted traffic. Reliable information on what was happening became impossible to come by. Rumors abounded. Her children brought home communist propaganda. As Mrs. Gauhari searched for her husband friends and colleagues in official places told contrary and implausible stories about his whereabouts; some of her relatives withdrew support; mysterious visitors for unknown reasons offered empty promises of help. The book could be read as a woman's experience in a male-dominated world. But it is much more: this is what it is like to be plunged without warning into civil war. The presumptions of ordinary life give way to the confusion, suspicion, and terror resulting from the suddend explosion of violence among neighbors and associates. In that sense this is one woman's account of life in the midst of a ferocious civil war, an experience that many peoples around the world have had in the last decade: in Rwanda and Burundi, for instance, where repeated massacres have taken hundreds of thousands of lives; in Yugoslavia where Serb, Croat, Bosnian Muslims, and Albanians have sought to cleanse each other from their respective enclaves; in Sri Lanka where Tamil separatists and Ceylonese nationalists have murdered each other for a generation; in Chechnya where a war of secession has destroyed the country.