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by Richard F. Calichman
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Historical
  • Author:
    Richard F. Calichman
  • ISBN:
    1885445202
  • ISBN13:
    978-1885445209
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    Cornell University - Cornell East Asia Series (April 2004)
  • Pages:
    254 pages
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    Historical
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Published by Cornell University's East Asia Program, this title is also included in Columbia University's Studies of. .Richard F. Calichman is Assistant Professor of Asian Studies at the City College of New York, CUNY.

Published by Cornell University's East Asia Program, this title is also included in Columbia University's Studies of the Weatherhead East Asian Institute. He is also the author of What is Modernity? The Writings of Takeuchi Yoshimi (Columbia University Press, 2004). Series: Cornell East Asia Series (Book 120). Paperback: 254 pages. Publisher: Cornell University - Cornell East Asia Series (April 2004).

Calichman, Richard F. (2004) Takeuchi Yoshimi: displacing the west, Cornell University East Asia . Katzenstein, Peter J. & Takashi Shiraishi (1997) Network Power: Japan and Asia, Cornell University Press. (2004) Takeuchi Yoshimi: displacing the west, Cornell University East Asia Program. Calichman, Richard F. (2005) What Is Modernity?: Writings of Takeuchi Yoshimi, Columbia University Press Katzenstein, Peter J. Koschmann, J. Victor (1993) "Intellectuals and Politics" in Gordon (1993), pp. 395–423. Victor (1997) "Asianism's Ambivalent Legacy" in Katzenstein et al. (1997), pp. 83–110. McCormack, Gavan (1996/2001) The Emptiness of Japanese Affluence, .

This work focuses on the writings of the postwar Japanese thinker and sinologist Takeuchi Yoshimi (1910-1977). Calichman is Assistant Professor of Asian Studies at the City College of New York, CUNY

This work focuses on the writings of the postwar Japanese thinker and sinologist Takeuchi Yoshimi (1910-1977). It presents itself less as an intellectual biography than as a series of explorative readings of his work. These readings attempt to trace out the various problematics with which Takeuchi was engaged throughout his career, with particular emphasis given to the notions of modernity, subjectivity and alterity.

Takeuchi Yoshimi book Richard F. Calichman is professor of Japanese studies at the City College of New York, CUNY.

Takeuchi Yoshimi book. Start by marking Takeuchi Yoshimi: Displacing the West as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read. His Columbia University Press books include Overcoming Modernity: Cultural Identity in Wartime Japan (2008); Contemporary Japanese Thought (2005); and What is Modernity? Writings of Takeuchi Yoshimi (2005).

Richard F. Calichman His publications include Takeuchi Yoshimi: Displacing the West (2004). Calichman. Calichman is Professor of Japan Studies at the City College of New York, CUNY. His publications include Takeuchi Yoshimi: Displacing the West (2004), What Is Modernity?

Calichman, Richard F. (2005) What Is Modernity?: Writings of Takeuchi Yoshimi, Columbia University Press. (2008) Overcoming Modernity: Cultural Identity in Wartime Japan, Columbia University Press. Chen, Kuan-Hsing & Chua Beng Huat

Richard F. Calichman, P. Professor of Japanese Studies and Director of Asian Studies. Publications include Takeuchi Yoshimi: Displacing the West (2004); What is Modernity?

Richard F. His scholarly interests focus on modern Japanese literature, philosophy, and intellectual history. Chen, Kuan-Hsing & Chua Beng Huat

On Takeuchi, see Eiji, Oguma, Minshu to Aikoku : Sengo Nihon no nashonarizumu to kōkyōsei (Tokyo: Shinyōsha, 2002), 394–446; Calichman, Richard, Takeuchi Yoshimi: Displacing the West (Ithaca: Cornell East Asia Series, 2004).

On Takeuchi, see Eiji, Oguma, Minshu to Aikoku : Sengo Nihon no nashonarizumu to kōkyōsei (Tokyo: Shinyōsha, 2002), 394–446; Calichman, Richard, Takeuchi Yoshimi: Displacing the West (Ithaca: Cornell East Asia Series, 2004). 36 See Watt, When Empire Comes Home; Ryūichi, Narita, ‘Hikiage’ to ‘Yokuryū,’ in Kurasawa, Aiko, e. Iwanami kōza: Ajia Taiheiyō Sensō, Volume 4: Teikoku no sensō keiken (Tokyo: Iwanami Shoten, 2006).

Takeuchi Yoshimi: displacing the west Philosophy East and West 63 (2) (2013).

Takeuchi Yoshimi: displacing the west. Calichman, Joseph A. Murphy, David G. Goodman, Shu-Ning Sciban, Fred Edwards, Robert J. Antony, Jane Kate Leonard, Pilwun Shih Wang, Sarah Wang & Kim Su-Young. Philosophy East and West 63 (2) (2013). Montclair State University. This article has no associated abstract. Jane Flax - 1998 - In Bat-Ami Bar On & Ann Ferguson (ed., Daring to Be Good: Essays in Feminist Ethico-Politics. pp. 143. The Immediate Successor of Wang Yang-Ming: Wang Lung-Hsi and His Theory of Ssu-Wu.

This work focuses on the writings of the postwar Japanese thinker and sinologist Takeuchi Yoshimi (1910–1977). It presents itself less as an intellectual biography than as a series of explorative readings of his work. These readings attempt to trace out the various problematics with which Takeuchi was engaged throughout his career, with particular emphasis given to the notions of modernity, subjectivity and alterity. In all cases, an effort was made to do justice to the difficult notion of "resistance," for which Takeuchi is perhaps most well-known. We have argued that what Takeuchi refers to as "Oriental resistance" against the West is in fact reflective of a more comprehensive notion of resistance, one that may be understood along the lines of the ultimate impossibility of conceptual knowledge. This impossibility is for Takeuchi essentially linked to a privileging of historical singularity over subjective identity, and with this a shift in emphasis from activity to passivity. We have sought throughout the work to draw out the complexity of Takeuchi’s thought, and in this way bring forth not only the important possibilities that inhere within it but as well what we consider to be at times its insufficiencies, or limits.