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by W. E. Mosse
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Historical
  • Author:
    W. E. Mosse
  • ISBN:
    1850435138
  • ISBN13:
    978-1850435136
  • Genre:
  • Publisher:
    I. B. Tauris; 2nd edition (May 15, 1992)
  • Pages:
    216 pages
  • Subcategory:
    Historical
  • Language:
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    1597 kb
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    1262 kb
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    1432 kb
  • Rating:
    4.2
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    522
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Concise and informative study of the reign of "the Great Liberator. Author Mosse is well-attuned to the constantly repeating alteration of repression and reform in Russian History.

I pulled this book off my shelf in large part becuse my copy is literally a pocket book,and I needed something I could tuck in my uniform pocket, so I could go through the "no bags" line at security. Concise and informative study of the reign of "the Great Liberator.

Home Browse Books Book details, Alexander II and the Modernization of Russia. Its special field is the life of man in society, and at every point we can learn vicariously from the experience of others before us in history

Home Browse Books Book details, Alexander II and the Modernization of Russia. Alexander II and the Modernization of Russia. Its special field is the life of man in society, and at every point we can learn vicariously from the experience of others before us in history. To take one point only - the understanding of politics: how can we hope to understand the world of affairs around us if we do not know how it came to be what it is? How to understand Germany or Soviet Russia, or the United States - or ourselves, without knowing something of their history? There is no subject that is more useful, or indeed indispensable.

Alexander II, Emperor of Russia, 1818-1881, Russia - History - Alexander II, 1855-1881. This book contains pen marking and highlights. London : English Universities Press.

Alexander was trained for governing. The death of Nicholas and the Crimean War was his first problem. Chapter 7 discusses the expansion of Russia. Colonial military forces sought promotions and glory in conquests in the east (. 22). This threatened British interests (. 23). The new Tsar reduced taxes and developed new railroad lines. Observers said Alexander did not have much strength of intellect or character (. 8). The changes in the economy led to widespread discontent (. 0). In 1856 he announced his intention to change or abolish serfdom (Chapter 3). Discussions considered various options.

the Modernization of Russia by .

Alexander II and the Modernization of Russia by . Unreformed Russia; the new emperor; the "Tsar Liberator"; the reforming emperor; Alexander, the Poles and the Finns; the "Tsar Despot"; Alexander II and the Russian experience; the "Tsar Martyr"; notes on books.

Whether you've loved the book or not, if you give your honest and detailed thoughts then people will find new books that are right for them.

Mosse, British historian and an authority on nineteenth-century Russia, brings into focus the roles played by Alexander's friends and enemies, his family and his mistress, as he delineates the course of the Tsars's personal tragedy and of his influence on the processes of historical change in Russia. Whether you've loved the book or not, if you give your honest and detailed thoughts then people will find new books that are right for them. 1. A Century of Service. Canada's Armed Forces from the Boer War to East Timor. Lotz J. Язык: english.

This book can be found in: Politics, Society & Education Politics & government Political science & theory Biography & True Stories Historical, political & military biographies Biography & True Stories Royal biographies. Alexander II and the Modernization of Russia (Hardback). This work tells the story of the reforming Tsar who modernized Russia after her defeat in the Crimean War. Few spheres of Russian life were untouched by his reforms.

Alexander the Second and the Modernization of Russia. Part of the Men and Their Times Series). In the face of bitter opposition, he liberated millions of serfs and secured their endowment with land.

Are you sure you want to remove Alexander II and the modernization of Russia. Alexander II, 1855-1881. There's no description for this book yet.

Alexander II and the modernization of Russia. You'll be next in line. Are you sure you want to remove Alexander II and the modernization of Russia. from your list? Alexander II and the modernization of Russia. by Werner Eugen Mosse. Published 1958 by English Universities Press ltd. in London.

When carefully regulated freedom produced a dangerous ferment of opinion, he reverted to a policy of repression.

This work tells the story of the reforming Tsar who modernized Russia after her defeat in the Crimean War. Few spheres of Russian life were untouched by his reforms. In the face of bitter opposition, he liberated millions of serfs and secured their endowment with land. He reformed the Russian courts, created institutions of local self-government, and promoted railway construction and economic development. Both as a westernizer and as the father of its "Industrial Revolution", Alexander II ranks high among the makers of modern Russia.Yet he failed in his efforts to guide his subjects along the path of ordered political evolution. When carefully regulated freedom produced a dangerous ferment of opinion, he reverted to a policy of repression. In the end, the "Tsar Liberator" fell victim to the bomb of an assassin; the forces he had unwittingly helped to release prepared Russia for an age of revolution. This study has been updated with a new introduction.

Alsantrius
very good write up of Alexander II's meaningful policies for Russia
Thundershaper
Alexander II and the Modernization of Russia, W. E. Mosse

The names of Peter the Great and Lenin are well-known but Alexander II the "Tsar Liberator" is little known. His changes to Russia were as important as the reforms of Peter or the October Revolution (`Preface'). The Emancipation of the Serfs was a great innovation, a change from semi-feudalism to an early capitalist economy. It increased the numbers of mobile free labor. The construction of railways stimulated the growth of industry, the expansion of banking and credit led to an Industrial Revolution. This undermined the power of the landowning nobility over their peasants. The law courts were reformed and a jury system adopted. Censorship was reduced to allow public discussion of policies. These reforms made Alexander II an important historical figure.

Russia was a poor and backward country by European standard when Alexander became Emperor ("Tsar") in 1855 (Chapter 1). The major problem was the persistence of serfdom on the estates of nobles or state lands. It meant human suffering, degradation, and misery. This chapter describes it all. Chapter 2 describes the life and education of Alexander. He had a disposition to vagueness and hesitation. He saw the wretchedness of the peasants while touring the country. He fell in love with Princess Mary in Darmstadt and married her. Alexander was trained for governing. The death of Nicholas and the Crimean War was his first problem. The new Tsar reduced taxes and developed new railroad lines. Observers said Alexander did not have much strength of intellect or character (p.38). The changes in the economy led to widespread discontent (p.40). In 1856 he announced his intention to change or abolish serfdom (Chapter 3). Discussions considered various options. The serfs were freed and would get their homestead and an allotment of land in two years.

Other reforms reduced the class privileges of the nobility and led to commercial and industrial expansion (Chapter 4). The legal system was reformed and reduced the power of the nobility. The new peace courts were popular (no bribes or blackmail). There was new local governments, the "zemstvos" (p.79). This led to more elementary schools. Larger towns got elective town councils "dumas". Their biggest achievement was in primary education, secondary education was encouraged for all. Higher education was improved. Cruel and barbarous punishment was abolished in the armed forces and for prisoners. The military service was reformed (p.86).

Chapter 5 tells about relations with Poland and Finland. Alexander punished the upper classes in Poland and favored the peasantry with land reform (p.99). A new railway improved economic life in Finland (p.101), other changes were made (p.103). The liberation of the serfs angered the aristocracy and disappointed those who expected more (Chapter 6). Socialist propaganda was widespread (p.107). There was widespread unrest in 1861-1862 (p.109). [No mention of the economy.] The Sunday-school movement was banned. Education spread liberal ideas (p.113). Alexander's relationship with a young woman caused concern and a decline in authority (p.117).

Chapter 7 discusses the expansion of Russia. Colonial military forces sought promotions and glory in conquests in the east (p.122). This threatened British interests (p.123). The Pan-Slav movement would conflict with Austria and Turkey and the Russian Empire (p.126). War with Turkey began in 1877 over Bulgaria (p.132). Revolutionary supporters increased in the 1870s (Chapter 9). They had popular support (p.137). Alexander II was unpopular in official society because of his mistress. One group of revolutionaries favored terror and planned to kill Alexander (p.130). There were discussions on a plan to create a constitutional monarchy (p.144). A thrown bomb ended Alexander's life and plans (p.146). There was not widespread mourning. Page 148 summarizes his faults; could this have been different (p.151)? Page 152 lists his changes and the good it did (abolish serfdom, improve the rural economy, bureaucratic reform, independent magistrates, trial by jury, a larger Russian empire, etc.).