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by Petr Mikhin
Download Guns Against the Reich: Memoirs of an Artillery Officer on the Eastern Front fb2
Historical
  • Author:
    Petr Mikhin
  • ISBN:
    1844159310
  • ISBN13:
    978-1844159314
  • Genre:
  • Publisher:
    Pen and Sword; First Edition edition (August 19, 2010)
  • Pages:
    224 pages
  • Subcategory:
    Historical
  • Language:
  • FB2 format
    1871 kb
  • ePUB format
    1138 kb
  • DJVU format
    1834 kb
  • Rating:
    4.6
  • Votes:
    337
  • Formats:
    docx azw mobi rtf


Guns Against the Reich is an army memoir written by a Russian veteran of the Great Patriotic War fought on the . Excellent book on the story of a Soviet artillery officer's experience fighting along the eastern front of WWII. Published on August 14, 2014.

Guns Against the Reich is an army memoir written by a Russian veteran of the Great Patriotic War fought on the Eastern Front. First and foremost, many of these soldiers never survived. The chances of a soldier surviving from the beginning of the war to the fall of Berlin for one fighting for the Russian Bear were not very good.

Guns Against the Reich book. This was a really good book on the war on the Eastern Front in World War II. The author was an artillery officer in the Red Army and spent three years fighting the Nazis

Guns Against the Reich book. The author was an artillery officer in the Red Army and spent three years fighting the Nazis. Lots of the time he was out in the front lines directing artillery fire and he miraculously survived many close encounters with the enemy: hand-to-hand combat, going on raids to capture prisoners, thwarting attacks by German panzers, sneaking behind German lines to bring back damaged equipment.

In three years of war on the Eastern Front - from the desperate defence of Moscow, through the epic struggles at Stalingrad and Kursk to the final offensives in central Europe - artilleryman Petr Mikhin experienced the full horror of battle. In this vivid memoir he recalls distant but deadly duels with German guns, close-quarter hand-to-hand combat, and murderous mortar and tank attacks, and he remembers the pity of defeat and the grief that accompanied victories that cost of thousands of lives. He was wounded and shell-shocked, he saw his comrades killed and was nearly captured,. In three years of war on the Eastern Front-from the desperate defense of Moscow, through the epic struggles at Stalingrad and Kursk to the final offensives in central Petr Mikhin experienced the full horror of battle.

Petr Mikhin served as an artillery officer in the Red Army, joining . Mikhin took part in some of the most important battles on the Eastern Front

Petr Mikhin served as an artillery officer in the Red Army, joining the army soon after the German invasion of the Soviet Union, and remaining on the front line until the end of the war. Mikhin took part in some of the most important battles on the Eastern Front. His first combat experience came in front of Moscow. This is the sort of book that simply couldn't have been written before the fall of the Soviet Union. Mikhin is often very critical of the political officers attached to his unit, very few of whom appear to have come anywhere near the fighting.

The story begins with Mikhin and his college classmates eagerly anticipating the romanticism and glory of a quick and decisive victory against Germany.

Mostly the data of the books and covers were damaged so many books . In this vivid memoir he recalls distant but deadly duels with German guns.

In three years of war on the Eastern Front-from the desperate defense of Moscow, through the epic struggles at Stalingrad and Kursk to the final offensives in central Petr Mikhin experienced the full horror of battle. In this vivid memoir he recalls distant but deadly duels with German guns, close-quarter hand-to-hand combat, and murderous mortar and tank attacks, and he remembers the pity of defeat and the grief that accompanied victories that cost thousands of lives.

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Mikhin recalls his experiences with a candor and an immediacy that brings the war on the Eastern Front-a war of immense scale and ly to life. Pen & Sword Books. Soldier Magazine, 08/2010 a very valuable picture of life in the Red Army during four years of intense non-stop fighting against a determined and skilled enemy. History of Wa. rg, 08/05/2010". 2 people like this topic.

In three years of war on the Eastern Front-from the desperate defense of Moscow, through the epic struggles at Stalingrad and Kursk to the final offensives in central Europe-artillery-man Petr Mikhin experienced the full horror of battle. In this vivid memoir he recalls distant but deadly duels with German guns, close-quarter hand-to-hand combat, and murderous mortar and tank attacks, and he remembers the pity of defeat and the grief that accompanied victories that cost thousands of lives. He was wounded and shell-shocked, he saw his comrades killed and was nearly captured, and he was threatened with the disgrace of a court martial. For years he lived with the constant strain of combat and the ever-present possibility of death. Mikhin recalls his experiences with a candor and an immediacy that brings the war on the Eastern Front-a war of immense scale and intensity-dramatically to life.

Winail
This interesting book was written by a Russian artillery officer who fought for three long years against the Germans in some of World War Two’s most important battles. The author fought from the outskirts of Moscow, to Stalingrad and Kursk and finally to central Europe.

The author of this book was a college mathematics student when the war started and like most of his peers, he rushed off to join army and save Russian from the invaders. In his case, using his skills in math to plot artillery shells. He very rapidly becomes an accomplished scout and observer.

The author spares little detail in explaining how he fought directly on the front lines, and sometimes behind the enemy lines, during the war. There are moments when one realizes it is only a matter of seconds between life and death on the Eastern front. One of my favorite moments concerns a German tank specifically hunting for the author.

Generationally I think it is nearly impossible for anyone alive today to understand the depth of the destruction of Eastern Europe during the war. As a result, I think this book is a valuable contribution to the historical record. The book provides a chilling perspective to the enormous lose the Russians sustained during the war.

Over all I truly enjoyed this book, More so than many other very fine books written or published recently by Russian’s who served in the Great Patriotic War. If you enjoyed this book, then I would suggest reading, “Red Road from Stalingrad: Recollections of a Soviet Infantryman” by Mansur Abdulin and Panzer Destroyer: Memoirs of a Red Army Tank Commander.
Bolv
This account of the "War Career" of the author is one that would certainly be fascinating to a person with an interest in the on goings of a Red army artillery officer, particularly as such was experienced during the first three years of the war. The book reads easily with one adventurous experience being related, after another in succession being related with no efforts to filter out the blood, and gore related to the battlefields of World War II.

I was disappointed that the writer's time in the field did not include actually entering Germany, because he was abruptly transferred toward Mongolia during the final weeks of the war in preparation to engage the Japanese army. But that is what he experienced. The Soviet Union never had much opportunity to fight the Japanese before they surrounded after the nuclear bombs were used by the US.

What I did enjoy concerning the experiences he did have was the understanding rendered by his being an Artillery Commander of batteries of Howitzers against the Germans. I did not really understand how important these weapons are against tanks, and massive infantry assaults. The importance of these smallish canons are actually critical in such defenses.

The author was a student of mathematics at the beginning of the war, and relates how the sudden invasion of the German army in June of 1942 was literary perceived by his fellow students. He makes references to the political officials both at the school, and during the battlefield life of the troops. He was even eventually accepted into the communist party during the fighting.

Many of the soldiers that he fought with died during his time in the war, and he relates the deaths vividly throughout the writing. This book is typical of most of the good "war experience" books that I have read in the past, and I recommend it to enthusiasts of the subject.

I would also say that viewing the very good movie "At The Enemy's Gates" again prior, or during the read would vividly enhance this reading experience.
Bladebringer
For those of you who have read or seen the movies All Quiet on the Western Front or who have seen the movie Gone With the Wind will remember the enthusiastic joy of the young men when war commenced. Unknowing virgins of combat excited with the romance of war. We all know that this feeling is but short lived when the reality of what war really is all about.

Guns Against the Reich is an army memoir written by a Russian veteran of the Great Patriotic War fought on the Eastern Front. Since the guns have been silenced in Europe of WWII some sixty eight years ago, not much has been written of the personal accounts of the soldiers who fought for Russia is this titanic struggle. First and foremost, many of these soldiers never survived. The chances of a soldier surviving from the beginning of the war to the fall of Berlin for one fighting for the Russian Bear were not very good.

In this book we follow the exploits of the author Petr Mikhin who joined the fight against the Nazis straight out of college. Going from a student of mathematics to the training fields of becoming an artillery officer we see a young man who for the next five years will transform to a solid experienced and very brave officer in a front line artillery unit.

We follow his training where we soon discover that even in school we see the beginnings of food deprivation and even keeping warm requires much effort. After this Lieutenant Mikhin goes directly to a front line artillery unit where he is a forward observer who spots targets for the battery to engage the enemy and destroy the targets. Mikhin describes the carnage of the front line units and the attitudes of the soldiers of the line, as a way of life for a line soldier is what is described by the author.

Mikhin describes the brutal slaughter that was the fighting at Rzhev. It is here where the good lieutenant becomes well versed in calling in accurate and devastating artillery fire on the enemy. At this point the hierarchy of the Russian command notes that this officer is a valued front line soldier. As good as Mikhin was he almost gets court-martialed when one of his howitzers fired a defective round and destroys the gun. He was accused of neglecting maintenance and thus sabotaging the Russian effort. Luckily for the good lieutenant he proved it was a defective round. Later on toward the end of the war then a captain he was accused of bad judgment in having four howitzers destroyed by an overwhelming force. Again Mikhin could prove otherwise that he was not incompetent.

Besides following the life and times of an artillery line officer who was indeed lucky to survive the whole ordeal on the Eastern Front, in doing so he also became a competent and caring leader of men. I learned that being in the Russian Army was like living a life on a double edge sword. If the Nazis didn't kill you your own army would accuse you and send you to the gulag or in front of a firing squad.

Life on the Russian side of the Eastern front was indeed no picnic and if you survived it was the equivalent of winning the lottery! Great first-hand account told in the first person and very personal and quite eye-opening. History told at the personal and up close level is sometimes the best way of learning what it was really like.