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by Paul David Nelson
Download General James Grant: Scottish Soldier and Royal Governor of East Florida fb2
Historical
  • Author:
    Paul David Nelson
  • ISBN:
    0813011752
  • ISBN13:
    978-0813011752
  • Genre:
  • Publisher:
    University Press of Florida; First Edition edition (February 20, 1993)
  • Pages:
    218 pages
  • Subcategory:
    Historical
  • Language:
  • FB2 format
    1751 kb
  • ePUB format
    1603 kb
  • DJVU format
    1306 kb
  • Rating:
    4.8
  • Votes:
    115
  • Formats:
    lrf rtf azw docx


Paul David Nelson does seem to make a solid living at chronicling the lives of secondary figures of the American Revolution. From 1763 until 1771, Grant served as an able governor of East Florida.

Paul David Nelson does seem to make a solid living at chronicling the lives of secondary figures of the American Revolution. Yet one can not ignore his works. There are few biographers with his skill and ability. After his service in Saint Augustine, Grant headed to England where he served in Parliment before serving as a major general in the American Revolution. While retaining a low opinion of the militia, Grant did see some success as one of his friend William Howe's chief tactical officers, planning the battles of Brooklyn and White Plains though he never quite was able to land the knockout blow.

General James Grant book. A smoothly written and well-balanced piece of history  .

Presses Of Florida, 1993. Fine in Fine DJ. First full-scale biography of the first royal governor of British colonial Florida (1763-73) ISBN: 0813011752 (Grant, James, Generals, Governors, Great Britain, Florida). Other Products from hartmannbooks (View All). La Forte, Robert S. Building the Death Railway: The Ordeal of American Pows in Burma, 1942-1945.

They divided it into two colonies, and James Grant was named governor of East Florida in 1764. Paul David Nelson; General James Grant, Scottish Soldier and Royal Governor of East Florida; 1993, University Press of Florida, ISBN 0-8130-1175-2. He ended Indian raids with the Treaty of Fort Picolata in attempts at maintaining peaceful relations between American Indian groups and Florida colonists and to entice future immigrants to his colony. Parliament of Great Britain.

Items related to General James Grant: Scottish Soldier and Royal . Please contact us with your wants, as we have many books not yet listed in our database.

Items related to General James Grant: Scottish Soldier and Royal Governor. General James Grant: Scottish Soldier and Royal Governor of East Florida. Full-scale biography of the first royal governor of British colonial Florida (1763-1773). Bookseller Inventory 28671. Ask Seller a Question. Bibliographic Details. Title: General James Grant: Scottish Soldier and.

James Grant : Scottish Soldier and Royal Governor of East Florida. Anthony Wayne: Soldier of the Early Republic.

General James Grant : Scottish Soldier and Royal Governor of East Florida. by Paul David Nelson. The Life of William Alexander, Lord Stirling. Francis Rawdon-hastings, Marquess Of Hastings: Soldier, Peer Of The Realm, Governor-general Of India. General Sir Guy Carleton, Lord Dorchester: Soldier-Statesman of Early British Canada.

Nelson, Paul David, 1941-. Publication, Distribution, et. Gainesville. University Press of Florida, (c)1993. Includes bibliographical references (p. 187-198) and index. Personal Name: Grant, James, 1720-1806. Corporate Name: Great Britain.

Find nearly any book by Paul David Nelson. Get the best deal by comparing prices from over 100,000 booksellers. ISBN 9780838638385 (978-0-8386-3838-5) Hardcover, Fairleigh Dickinson Univ Pr, 2000.

Paul David Nelson; "General James Grant, Scottish Soldier and Royal Governor of East Florida"; 1993 .

Paul David Nelson; "General James Grant, Scottish Soldier and Royal Governor of East Florida"; 1993, University Press of Florida, ISBN 0-8130-1175-2. British National Party - For other uses, see British National Party (disambiguation).

In his youth, James Grant studied law, but in September 1741 he abandoned his studies and enlisted in the First Royal . Gainesville: University Press of Florida, 1993.

In his youth, James Grant studied law, but in September 1741 he abandoned his studies and enlisted in the First Royal Scots Regiment as an ensign. Promoted second lieutenant in May 1742, he was sent to Flanders in June 1744. During the summer he was promoted to the rank of lieutenant, and on 24 October he was made a captain. He fought at Fontenoy (Belgium) on 11 May 1745, emerging from the action without a scratch. revised by Paul David Nelson. Encyclopedia of the American Revolution: Library of Military History.

"A smoothly written and well-balanced piece of history. [three dots] Nelson's portrayal of Grant as a Scotsman and soldier is the common thread that runs throughout the book, keeping everything in perspective and providing the reader with a readily accessible and fascinating narrative."--Philander D. Chase, editor of The Papers of George Washington, University of Virginia Though Major General James Grant's name appears in many early histories of Florida, he has been remembered primarily for one speech he delivered in Parliament in 1775 that disparaged American military might. In this first full-scale biography of him, Nelson establishes Grant as an intelligent participant in the political and military events of his age.    As the first royal governor of British colonial Florida (1763-73), Grant practically created the colony once it was secured from Spain at the end of the Seven Years' War. His deliberate cultivation of friendships in the neighboring colonies of Georgia and South Carolina is part of the annals of royal administration, and he left behind a record of balanced, careful leadership. Even after he returned to Great Britain, where he represented Scottish constituencies in Parliament, he maintained an interest in Florida's fate, not least because he held tracts of land in East Florida that yielded profits from indigo.    Using previously neglected Grant papers at Ballindalloch Castle in Scotland, as well as better-known materials, Nelson documents the roots of Grant's personality and ambitions, producing a work of interest for scholars of the American Revolution and of military history, as well as early Florida and 18th-century British history. Paul David Nelson is professor of history and chair of the department at Berea College and the author of other biographies, including William Tryon and the Course of Empire: A Life in British Imperial Service, William Alexander: Lord Stirling, Anthony Wayne: Soldier of the Early Republic, and General Horatio Gates.

Velan
I have to say that my thoughts of James Grant have always been negative, but this book made me look at the man in a completely new way. My understanding of him has always centered around the statements he made in parliament about marching from one end of America to the other with 5,000 men. This book showed him to not only being a brave and dedicated soldier, but a good colonial governor and business man. A really good history of the man.
Haal
Paul David Nelson does seem to make a solid living at chronicling the lives of secondary figures of the American Revolution. Yet one can not ignore his works. There are few biographers with his skill and ability.

Nelson's look at the life of James Grant proves useful and readable. Grant remains one of those obscure English figures who popped up all over North America in the 18th century. A proud son of Scotland, Grant worked his way up the military ladder after service in Europe. During the French and Indian war, Grant would lead one failed mission at Fort Duquesne (which would lead to his capture), a more succesful one in South Carolina against the Creeks, and spend time in the islands. From 1763 until 1771, Grant served as an able governor of East Florida. After his service in Saint Augustine, Grant headed to England where he served in Parliment before serving as a major general in the American Revolution. While retaining a low opinion of the militia, Grant did see some success as one of his friend William Howe's chief tactical officers, planning the battles of Brooklyn and White Plains though he never quite was able to land the knockout blow. Having said that, Grant's star rose after Henry Clinton's fell with Howe (for a detailed analysis of the odd relationship of Howe and Clinton, see Wilcox's classic "Portrait of a General"). After Howe was recalled, Grant did excellent work for his cause at St. Lucia.

The only real problem is the book seems a bit too short at points. The Florida years for example seem rather rushed. Otherwise, Nelson shows how a Scottish second son could rise to prominence in 18th century England. Nelson is able to catch Grant's personality to some extent. This obese soldier liked the high life and could be stubborn and somewhat cantakerous yet still something of a social creature. Nelson also did a great deal of work with the primary sources. While Grant may be more than a bit obscure, he does come to life in this excellent, though short, biography.
Simple
Paul David Nelson does seem to make a solid living at chronicling the lives of secondary figures of the American Revolution. Yet one can not ignore his works. There are few biographers with his skill and ability.

Nelson's look at the life of James Grant proves useful and readable. Grant remains one of those obscure English figures who popped up all over North America in the 18th century. A proud son of Scotland, Grant worked his way up the military ladder after service in Europe. During the French and Indian war, Grant would lead one failed mission at Fort Duquesne (which would lead to his capture), a more succesful one in South Carolina against the Creeks, and spend time in the islands. From 1763 until 1771, Grant served as an able governor of East Florida. After his service in Saint Augustine, Grant headed to England where he served in Parliment before serving as a major general in the American Revolution. While retaining a low opinion of the militia, Grant did see some success as one of his friend William Howe's chief tactical officers, planning the battles of Brooklyn and White Plains though he never quite was able to land the knockout blow. Having said that, Grant's star rose after Henry Clinton's fell with Howe (for a detailed analysis of the odd relationship of Howe and Clinton, see Wilcox's classic "Portrait of a General"). After Howe was recalled, Grant did excellent work for his cause at St. Lucia.

The only real problem is the book seems a bit too short at points. The Florida years for example seem rather rushed. Otherwise, Nelson shows how a Scottish second son could rise to prominence in 18th century England. Nelson is able to catch Grant's personality to some extent. This obese soldier liked the high life and could be stubborn and somewhat cantakerous yet still something of a social creature. Nelson also did a great deal of work with the primary sources. While Grant may be more than a bit obscure, he does come to life in this excellent, though short, biography.