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by Ruth Scurr
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Historical
  • Author:
    Ruth Scurr
  • ISBN:
    0805082611
  • ISBN13:
    978-0805082616
  • Genre:
  • Publisher:
    Holt Paperbacks; Reprint edition (April 17, 2007)
  • Pages:
    448 pages
  • Subcategory:
    Historical
  • Language:
  • FB2 format
    1883 kb
  • ePUB format
    1694 kb
  • DJVU format
    1644 kb
  • Rating:
    4.7
  • Votes:
    200
  • Formats:
    doc lrf lrf rtf


No sooner were his severed remains collected, tossed into an unmarked grave, and covered with quicklime than the struggle began to grasp the connection between Robespierre’s personality and his role in the Revolution.

Ruth Scurr does for Robespierre and the French Revolution what Quentin Bell did for Virginia Woolf and Bloomsbury: she apprehends the complete personality of the man, the moment, and the movement. A work of genuine scholarship and political literature, Fatal Purity is an electrifying biography of an epoch's vaulting ambitions and wounded pride, radical vision and terrifying uncertainty, bracing heroism and decimating energies. Corey Robin, author of Fear: The History of a Political Idea.

Ruth Scurr blends Robespierre's ruthlessness and idealism skilfully in her fine biography of the Incorruptible, Fatal Purity, says .

Ruth Scurr blends Robespierre's ruthlessness and idealism skilfully in her fine biography of the Incorruptible, Fatal Purity, says Rebecca Abrams. Robespierre is a puzzling, deeply troubling figure in the story of the French revolution, and at the outset of this marvellous biography, historian Ruth Scurr sets out the nature of this puzzle clearly. How did an unknown provincial lawyer rise so quickly to such prominence at the political centre of the revolution?

Her first book, Fatal Purity: Robespierre and the French Revolution (Chatto & Windus, 2006; Metropolitan Books, 2006) won the Franco-British Society . Fatal purity : Robespierre and the French Revolution. London: Chatto & Windus. John Aubrey : my own life.

Her first book, Fatal Purity: Robespierre and the French Revolution (Chatto & Windus, 2006; Metropolitan Books, 2006) won the Franco-British Society Literary Prize (2006), was shortlisted for the Duff Cooper Prize (2006), long-listed for the Samuel Johnson Prize (2007) and was listed among the 100 Best Books of the Decade in The Times in 2009. Dissertations, theses.

Against the dramatic backdrop of the French Revolution, historian Ruth Scurr tracks Robespierre's evolution from provincial lawyer to devastatingly efficient revolutionary leader, righteous and paranoid in equal measure. She explores his reformist zeal, his role in the fall of the monarchy, his passionate attempts to design a modern republic, even his extraordinary effort to found a perfect religion.

Электронная книга "Fatal Purity: Robespierre and the French Revolution", Ruth Scurr. Эту книгу можно прочитать в Google Play Книгах на компьютере, а также на устройствах Android и iOS. Выделяйте текст, добавляйте закладки и делайте заметки, скачав книгу "Fatal Purity: Robespierre and the French Revolution" для чтения в офлайн-режиме.

By eighteenth-century standards, it was a modern European city, with a carefully planned symmetrical grid of streets, avenues, and monuments (which was later borrowed as a model for Washington, . 1 When Arthur Young visited Versailles on his travels in 1789, he noted that this town is absolutely fed by the palace.

Pretending to not be afraid is as good as actually not being afraid. A Climate for Change. 54 MB·27,143 Downloads. Ch 3); Vulnerability in tourism (Ch 6); Vulnerability in the coastal zone (Ch 7); Landau, Seth – General coordinatio.

Ruth Scurr is of like mind. Ruth Scurr's Robespierre reminds us that, scale apart, our modern crises are replays of a golden oldie. At times she loses patience with her subject, finding his character defective, his methods brutal, and his vision deluded. Yet her title accurately encapsulates her engaging fascination with this paradoxical man. "Purity" is a recognition of his unworldly innocence while "fatal" acknowledges the maxim that idealists, alas, make very bad revolutionaries. But what makes this fine political biography of the birth of modern Terror particularly engrossing is its timing. David Coward's books include 'A History of French Literature' (Blackwell).

A riveting biography of the French Revolution's most enigmatic figure that . Fatal Purity is very well written.

A riveting biography of the French Revolution's most enigmatic figure that restores him to his pivotal historic place Since his execution by guillotine in July. Ruth Scurr delves into the conflicted mind of Robespierre and examines the French revolutionary's descent from man of the people to murderous tyrant. An excellent look at one of history's most misunderstood, yet fearful, figures. The story of Robespierre from his childhood through his short corrupt attempt to dominate France is full of fascinating detail written in a manner that maintained interest through its entirety.

"Judicious, balanced, and admirably clear at every point. This is quite the calmest and least abusive history of the Revolution you will ever read."―Hilary Mantel, London Review of Books

Since his execution by guillotine in July 1794, Maximilien Robespierre has been contested terrain for historians. Was he a bloodthirsty charlatan or the only true defender of revolutionary ideals? The first modern dictator or the earliest democrat? Was his extreme moralism a heroic virtue or a ruinous flaw?

Against the dramatic backdrop of the French Revolution, historian Ruth Scurr tracks Robespierre's evolution from provincial lawyer to devastatingly efficient revolutionary leader, righteous and paranoid in equal measure. She explores his reformist zeal, his role in the fall of the monarchy, his passionate attempts to design a modern republic, even his extraordinary effort to found a perfect religion. And she follows him into the Terror, as the former death- penalty opponent makes summary execution the order of the day, himself falling victim to the violence at the age of thirty-six.

Written with epic sweep, full of nuance and insight, Fatal Purity is a fascinating portrait of a man who identified with the Revolution to the point of madness, and in so doing changed the course of history.


Billy Granson
One cannot too highly praise this biography. It flows smoothly and interestingly. The style of writing is admirable.

In addition, the author is fair to Robespierre, a man so easy to condemn. He had not many virtues, but those few he had are carefully related in this biography, among them his affection for his sisters and for the family he lived with in Paris. Yet the author details Robespierre's cruelty in condemning to death even his one-time friends -- Danton and Desmoulins. They had been close to him, but he sent them to the scaffold apparently without a qualm.

Robespierre was a fanatic, a rigid man without a soul. Any national turmoil would have brought that out, anywhere, in any age, but this trait of cruelty and fanaticism would have been exercised in obscurity. The pity was that he was able to rise to the pinnacle of power in a country that had lost its sanity and its decency.

I doubt that you will find a better presentation of the horrifying last hours of Robespierre's life. The author is careful to state what is known and what is surmised.

Robespierre, it is assumed, tried to commit suicide but shot himself in the jaw. His face mangled and his pain unimaginable, he was taken finally to execution along with seventeen of his associates.

As the author states:
"Outside, the carts were already waiting for them, and the guillotine had been brought back into the city center and reassembled in the place de la Révolution especially for the occasion. By early evening, enormous crowds filled the streets and the banks of the Seine. Everyone wanted to see Robespierre go past."

The hatred of the Parisians was immense, but it was a little late.

Few biographies are as convincing or as enthralling as this one. It is to be recommended without reservation.
Syleazahad
As much as any other single political eruption, the French revolution dramatically altered the course of history, in France as well as all of Europe and elsewhere. Its legacy can be found today in the ancient divisions and entanglements which continue to roil French politics. I have heard much, but actually knew little, about the revolution’s intricacies and details, a shortcoming in which I expect I was not alone. Ruth Scurr’s book has done a great deal to alleviate the problem.

The revolution arose not from a single definable source or clique of individuals but from a vortex of economic anxieties, food shortages, social and cultural grievances, jealousies, disputes and resentments. All were further accentuated by generalized political unrest and ideological turmoil. It entailed a convergence of conditions not easily untangled, but Ms. Scurr has succeeded in sorting through and bringing order to the maze.

Her prose is precise, fluent, and readable, and only rarely does she seem to stray from the strand of her narrative. The method she employs is biographic. Her story is built around the life of Maximilien Robespierre, his talents, his ambition, his maneuvering, his shifting loyalties and evolving ideology. The technique provides continuity and works well in delineating the the convoluted manner in which the revolution unfolded over five stormy years. But it also has shortcomings, sometimes bypassing crucial events or minimizing the role of other crucial figures.

There is little question that Robespierre was a pivotal figure in the ongoing drama. An obscure provincial lawyer from the Northern city of Arras, he had been scarred in his youth by scandals involving his father which left him with an enduring set of ingrained grievances. But he was imbued with a high, if radical, set of ideals, which he continued to pursue, even as they eroded into savagery as the revolution progressed.

Having moved to Paris, his oratorical and political skills won him converts, and he maneuvered adeptly among the constantly reshaping set of revolutionary committees, communes, and commissions, many of which he came to dominate. But as his views turned more fanatical and his activities more manipulative and peremptory, he was involved in constant infighting. Always suspicious, he grew increasingly paranoid and distrusting. He turned against and betrayed former colleagues and associates whom he suspected of traitorous activity, effectively sending them to the guillotine. Jean Cocteau once suggested that "Victor Hugo was a madman who thought he was Victor Hugo". A similar thing could be said about Robespierre in the later stages of the revolution.

Ms. Scurr works hard at maintaining a balanced score card. She gives credit to Robespierre for his incorruptibility and is sympathetic to his sticking to what he saw as his ideals, twisted and reckless though they became. Overall, she seems more defensive of his personality and activities than appears justifiable considering where they finally led. Starting as a man of principle he descended step by step into a bloodthirsty tyranny that cost the lives of thousands, including many of his friends.

Ironically, he was finally brought down not by the political conservatives or moderates he had fought so zealously but by atheists and anti-clericals who despised a type of state religion he had invented and sought to impose. Fatal Purity ends with Robespierre’s death on the same guillotine where he had sent so many others. Although Ms. Scurr presented an account of his family history and early life she ends her work rather abruptly at this point.

But the revolutionary story was not yet over, so a reader curious about its demise and transition to the Directoire, and later to the Napoleon-dominated Consulat, must look elsewhere. In the meanwhile, I commend this book to anyone seeking a better understanding of one of history’s most astonishing dramas, as well as one of its most notorious fanatics.
Natety
The book gave a lot of historical information about the French Revolution and the role Robespierre had in it. But, the narration was filled with too many comments by the author explaining how his action or a certain context might had an impact on the Reign of Terror and on France. It can become quite annoying to read about an event only to be interrupted again and again by the author's commentaries. I would have liked being permitted to read and make my own judgments. Also, in the second half of the book, the author goes forth and back in time making it difficult for me to keep track of the events unfolding in the book.

This book is more appropriate for readers who already know a great deal about the French Revolution. For a person who knows little, this book can be confusing.