» » Jefferson and the Indians: The Tragic Fate of the First Americans

Download Jefferson and the Indians: The Tragic Fate of the First Americans fb2

by Anthony F. C. Wallace
Download Jefferson and the Indians: The Tragic Fate of the First Americans fb2
Historical
  • Author:
    Anthony F. C. Wallace
  • ISBN:
    0674005481
  • ISBN13:
    978-0674005488
  • Genre:
  • Publisher:
    Belknap Press: An Imprint of Harvard University Press (May 2, 2001)
  • Pages:
    416 pages
  • Subcategory:
    Historical
  • Language:
  • FB2 format
    1359 kb
  • ePUB format
    1442 kb
  • DJVU format
    1346 kb
  • Rating:
    4.6
  • Votes:
    254
  • Formats:
    rtf docx rtf mobi


1999) "Jefferson and the Indians: The Tragic Fate of the First Americans", Cambridge, MA: Belknap Press. 2012) Tuscarora: A History, Albany, NY: SUNY Press.

1999) "Jefferson and the Indians: The Tragic Fate of the First Americans", Cambridge, MA: Belknap Press. Darnell, Regna (2006) "Keeping the Faith: A Legacy of Native American Ethnography, Ethnohistory, and Psychology. In: New Perspectives on Native North America: Cultures, Histories, and Representations, ed. by Sergei A. Kan and Pauline Turner Strong, pp. 3–16. Lincoln: University of Nebraska Press.

The interpretive talents of Anthony F. C. Wallace give us every good reason to rejoice in the publication of this book

The interpretive talents of Anthony F. Wallace give us every good reason to rejoice in the publication of this book. Patricia Nelson Limerick, University of Colorado, Boulder). Many have written ably on Thomas Jefferson and the Indians, but none has succeeded in bringing together as thoroughly and effectively as this book so many different, relevant dimensions of that topic. This is a rich, multidimensional book that offers a complex and utterly convincing interpretation of Jefferson and the first Americans. Anthony Wallace has succeeded in taking a fresh and engaging look at the subject.

Wallace comes closest to holding Jefferson responsible for the Indians' fate in his opening chapters. Even as he weighs Jefferson's moral responsibility for the Indians' fate, he recognizes that the revolutionaries faced daunting geopolitical challenges

Wallace comes closest to holding Jefferson responsible for the Indians' fate in his opening chapters. Even as he weighs Jefferson's moral responsibility for the Indians' fate, he recognizes that the revolutionaries faced daunting geopolitical challenges. In a period of profound international instability and with potential enemies on all sides, the republic was always at risk.

In Thomas Jefferson's time, white Americans were bedeviled by a moral dilemma unyielding to reason and .

In Thomas Jefferson's time, white Americans were bedeviled by a moral dilemma unyielding to reason and sentiment: what to do about the presence of black slaves and free Indians. That Jefferson himself was caught between his own soaring rhetoric and private behavior toward blacks has long been known. But the tortured duality of his attitude toward Indians is only now being unearthed. In this landmark history, Anthony Wallace takes us on a tour of discovery to unexplored regions of Jefferson's mind.

Jefferson and the Indians book. Wallace has a clear feeling for the tragedy of the American Indian. Yet his book is balanced in tone and does not degenerate into ideological or special pleading. His opinions are stated clearly and eloquently in his introduction and conclusion and in his discussions of the events described in the text.

Jefferson and the Indians. Published by Thriftbooks

Jefferson and the Indians. Published by Thriftbooks. The first is Robert Remini's study of Jacksonian American, "Andrew Jackson and his Indian Wars". The second is Professor Wallace's book on Jefferson's relationship to the Indians, which I am discussing here. Remini's and Wallace's book can be read together because both tell parts of the same sad story. Expansionist pressures from settlers and the fear of the United States of Indian attacks, particularly when incited by hostile European nations led to a policy of land cessions, wars, and forced removal westward of the Indian tribes.

In his Notes on the State of Virginia, which Thomas Jefferson began writing in 1781 and first published in 1785, he. .

In his Notes on the State of Virginia, which Thomas Jefferson began writing in 1781 and first published in 1785, he inserted an English rendering of a speech by the Indian leader Tachnedorus, or John Logan. The address had been delivered to the victorious Lord Dunmore, governor of Virginia, on the occasion of the signing of a peace treaty with the Shawnees in 1774. It was the valedictory address of a defeated warrior. By Anthony F C Wallace. Shop for Books on Google Play.

Wallace, Anthony F. 1923-. Publication, Distribution, et. Cambridge, Mass. Includes bibliographical references (p. -373) and index. Personal Name: Jefferson, Thomas, 1743-1826 Views on Indians. Belknap Press of Harvard University Press, (c)1999. Personal Name: Jefferson, Thomas, 1743-1826 Political and social views.

Anthony Francis Clarke Wallace (April 15, 1923 – October 5, 2015) was a Canadian-American anthropologist who . 1999) "Jefferson and the Indians: The Tragic Fate of the First Americans. Cambridge, MA: Belknap/Harvard. 2012) Tuscarora: A History. Albany, NY:SUNY Press.

Anthony Francis Clarke Wallace (April 15, 1923 – October 5, 2015) was a Canadian-American anthropologist who specialized in Native American cultures, especially the Iroquois.

In Thomas Jefferson's time, white Americans were bedeviled by a moral dilemma unyielding to reason and sentiment: what to do about the presence of black slaves and free Indians. That Jefferson himself was caught between his own soaring rhetoric and private behavior toward blacks has long been known. But the tortured duality of his attitude toward Indians is only now being unearthed.

In this landmark history, Anthony Wallace takes us on a tour of discovery to unexplored regions of Jefferson's mind. There, the bookish Enlightenment scholar--collector of Indian vocabularies, excavator of ancient burial mounds, chronicler of the eloquence of America's native peoples, and mourner of their tragic fate--sits uncomfortably close to Jefferson the imperialist and architect of Indian removal. Impelled by the necessity of expanding his agrarian republic, he became adept at putting a philosophical gloss on his policy of encroachment, threats of war, and forced land cessions--a policy that led, eventually, to cultural genocide.

In this compelling narrative, we see how Jefferson's close relationships with frontier fighters and Indian agents, land speculators and intrepid explorers, European travelers, missionary scholars, and the chiefs of many Indian nations all complicated his views of the rights and claims of the first Americans. Lavishly illustrated with scenes and portraits from the period, Jefferson and the Indians adds a troubled dimension to one of the most enigmatic figures of American history, and to one of its most shameful legacies.


Vispel
This is a pretty remarkable book that focuses not just on Jefferson's philosophy and dealings with Native Americans but the abundance of treaties during the pre-revolution up through Jefferson's administration. As always, any book about Jefferson is challenged by Jefferson's complex personality and the reader should be cautioned that the author sees Jefferson in a less than enlightened manor than many historians who in turn are great admirers of the man. For one, the author does not see Jefferson as a man of original ideas but one who is well educated and refines the ideas of others. The author also sees Jefferson, as many of the prominent signers of the declaration of independence as a major investor in securing western lands. The author tackles Jefferson's unique view of the Indians that in some ways parallel his view on slavery. Although an admirer of the Indians and anxious to make treaties, there is no doubt that Jefferson believed in expansionism as his treaties secured America a wealth of land making Jefferson the greatest securer of territories other than President Polk. The author details a multitude of treaties among the tribes conveyed by numerous Indian agents in the various territories and describes them in detail from the various Indian chiefs to the complexities of the land dealings. I would have preferred more maps to clearly understand the tribal boundaries in contrast to U.S.'s current boundaries. Included with the treaties are descriptions of the various Indian clashes particularly in the northwest that after a disaster is reconciled by the whites victory at Fallen Timbers by "Mad Anthony" Wayne. Of particular interest for a student of Jefferson is his philosophy of westernizing the Indians by attempting what in his mind were fair treaties while encouraging trading with the Indians to increase an interdependency that would eventually lead Indians to end up becoming more like whites, cultivating land and living in settlements. As one European writer noted who traveled to the frontier noted, life was extraordinarily difficult for the pioneers living on the fringe; he did not see this being successful for the Indians who were very far from transportation and commerce areas. In addition, Jefferson had no expectations that Indians could actually intermingle in a white society and he had expectations that all tribes would have to move further west, an action taken by force by Andrew Jackson during his presidency. The author covers a great deal of territory including the fascinating relationship between President Jefferson and the controversial General Wilkinson who was not only commander of all U.S. forces, temporary governor of the Louisiana territory but also as an Indian agent. The author frequently sprinkles letters and documents written by key participants, including Jefferson, and he provides numerous insights into the Native American point of view. As stated earlier, the author has a more direct objective look at Jefferson, one passage from an observer writes of Jefferson walking among his slaves with an implement in his hand, noting that the slaves reacted as they would if any 'master' walked among them, working obviously harder in his presence. The author does not criticize Jefferson any more than any other slave owner but represents him, as he was, a plantation owner, philosopher and a man of his times. From this serious work, you will appreciate the difficulties Native Americans had in holding onto their lands while seeing Jefferson as a mixture between a benevolent leader to a man with a great national appetite for expansion.
Umor
A very good book for anyone interested in the specific subject of the title or Jefferson per se. The book argues that Jefferson
set in motion what would be American Indian policy. One can see that he had much the same views of the future of the
Indians as Andrew Jackson, just not as crude. The future of native americans would be assimilation or destruction.
Goltikree
Was pleasantly surprised to find the book still in the plastic.
Thordira
Many works on early United States history tend to give Indian affairs less attention than it deserves. There are two recent books with which I am familiar that help correct this situation. The first is Robert Remini's study of Jacksonian American, "Andrew Jackson and his Indian Wars". The second is Professor Wallace's book on Jefferson's relationship to the Indians, which I am discussing here.

Remini's and Wallace's book can be read together because both tell parts of the same sad story. Expansionist pressures from settlers and the fear of the United States of Indian attacks, particularly when incited by hostile European nations led to a policy of land cessions, wars, and forced removal westward of the Indian tribes. The process culminated with Andrew Jackson's Indian wars and presidency, the subject of Remini's book, but it was effectively put in place by Thomas Jefferson, as shown by Wallace.

Jefferson and his Indian policy, however, seem to me to present a more complex case than Jackson. As Wallace's book shows, Jefferson was indeed a polymath, a scholar and intellectual as well as a, paradoxically, man of power and position. Jefferson took a genuine interest in Indian archaeology, culture and language and made himself or encouraged others to make, scholarly and enthnological contributions that are still important towards understanding the Indians.

Jefferson, even on Professor Wallace's account, had compassion for the Indian tribes and an interest in their well-being, even if this interest was overshadowed, as it was, by his desire to obtain Indian land for the new nation and even though his view of Indian interests was misguided and partial.

Wallace's book traces Jefferson's early relationship with Indians beginning before the revolution when Jefferson was a land speculator in the then Western United States. He explores in detail Jefferson's writing on Indians, particularly his writing on the Indian chief Logan in his "Notes on the State of Virginia." Jefferson's partial reading of the fate of this "Noble Savage", according to Wallace, shows the ambivalent character of Jefferson's approach to the Indians.

Wallace describes in detail Jefferson the politician approaching Indian affairs in the original United States territory and in the Louisiana purchase, which doubled the size of the United States. The announced goals of the policy were peace, land cessions and civilization for the Indians. Too often, these policies became simply the means for tribal destruction and deprivation and for the removal policy, for both the southern and the northern tribes, that culminated in the administration of Andrew Jackson. (again, see the Remini book.)

There are some fascinating quotations in the book that illustrate Wallace's points that are set aside and emphasized in blocked-type and quotes. It is a good way of gaining focus. The book has a wealth of documentation and is not simply a political history. As I indicated Jefferson was a complex individual and this book shows him, focusing on Indian affairs, in all his personal and political variety.
Wallace has a clear feeling for the tragedy of the American Indian. Yet his book is balanced in tone and does not degenerate into ideological or special pleading. His opinions are stated clearly and eloquently in his introduction and conclusion and in his discussions of the events described in the text. The book has the measure of a scholar and encourages the reader to reflect for him or herself on the record.

There are those who are skeptical of the public's recent interest in American History, as shown by the success of McCollough's John Adams as well as other popular historical works, on grounds that it is a new attempt to promote American exceptionalism and to avoid considering the tragedies of our past. I disagree. I think, this interest in history shows a renewed love and interest in our country with no desire to minimize its failings. Wallace's book to me shows both love of our country and a sense of one of its major tragedies.

Robin Friedman