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by Professor Peter Gay
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Historical
  • Author:
    Professor Peter Gay
  • ISBN:
    0300076703
  • ISBN13:
    978-0300076707
  • Genre:
  • Publisher:
    Yale University Press; 1st Edition edition (October 7, 1998)
  • Pages:
    222 pages
  • Subcategory:
    Historical
  • Language:
  • FB2 format
    1251 kb
  • ePUB format
    1574 kb
  • DJVU format
    1887 kb
  • Rating:
    4.3
  • Votes:
    492
  • Formats:
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Peter Gay is Sterling Professor of History Emeritus at Yale University and director of the Center for Scholars and Writers .

Peter Gay is Sterling Professor of History Emeritus at Yale University and director of the Center for Scholars and Writers, New York Public Library. He is the author of many books, including the five-volume The Bourgeois Experience: Victoria to Freud; Freud: A Life for Our Time; A Godless Jew: Freud, Atheism, and the Making of Psychoanalysis; Voltaire’s Politics; and Reading Freud, the last three published by Yale University Press. 8 people found this helpful.

Gay does not apologize for his father or other German-Jews, but rather offers an. .Growing Up in Germany or The Reader (Oprah's Book Club) (now a movie that I also highly recommend, having seen .

Gay does not apologize for his father or other German-Jews, but rather offers an explanation of the mixed signals and the difficulty of escape. Or if it's an apology, it is, as he says "an unapologetic apology. American scholar Peter Gay, until the age of ten or 12, considered himself to be just another German schoolboy from Berlin. The problem was that Gay's family was Jewish, in the eyes of the Nazi regime that rose to power in 1933. 7 people found this helpful.

My German Question book. Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read. Start by marking My German Question: Growing Up in Nazi Berlin as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read.

Professor Gay held an ACLS Fellowship in 1959–60 Mozart, 1999.

Professor Gay held an ACLS Fellowship in 1959–60. He has also been recognized with several honorary doctorates Mozart, 1999.

Professor Peter Gay. In this book, an historian tells of his youth as an assimilated, antireligious Jew in Nazi Germany from 1933-1939 - "the story" says Peter Gay, "of a poisoning and how I dealt with it". Gay describes his family, the life they led, and the reasons they did not emigrate sooner, and he explores his own ambivalent feelings - then and now - toward Germany and the Germans

Gay relates that the early years of the Nazi regime were relatively benign for his family: as a schoolboy at the Goethe . A disappointingly lackluster memoir focusing on the six boyhood years (1933-39) Gay spent in Nazi Berlin.

Gay relates that the early years of the Nazi regime were relatively benign for his family: as a schoolboy at the Goethe Gymnasium he experienced no ridicule or attacks, his father's business prospered, and most of the family's non-Jewish friends remained supportive. All the intellectual and stylistic dimensions that make master historian and biographer Gay.

Find many great new & used options and get the best deals for My German Question : Growing up in Nazi . Renowned historian tells of his youth as an assimilated Jew in Nazi Germany from 1933 to 1939

Renowned historian tells of his youth as an assimilated Jew in Nazi Germany from 1933 to 1939. Describes his family, the life they led, & the reasons they did not emigrate sooner, & he explores his own ambivalent feelings-then & now-toward Germany & the Germans.

Gay, Peter, 1923-, Jews, National socialism, Jews, Jews. New Haven : Yale University Press. Books for People with Print Disabilities. Internet Archive Books. Uploaded by LannetteF on September 7, 2010. SIMILAR ITEMS (based on metadata).

My German Question Growing Up in Nazi Berlin Peter Ga.

My German Question Growing Up in Nazi Berlin Peter Gay. Price: £1. 9. Peter Gay is Sterling Professor of History Emeritus at Yale University and director of the Center for Scholars and Writers, New York Public Library.

The respected historian and prolific author traces his youth as an assimilated, atheistic Jew during the early years of the Nazi regime, his family's increasingly urgent emigration in 1939, and his lingering ambivalent feelings toward Germany and the Germans. UP.

Brannylv
American scholar Peter Gay, until the age of ten or 12, considered himself to be just another German schoolboy from Berlin. The problem was that Gay's family was Jewish, in the eyes of the Nazi regime that rose to power in 1933. And still, for years, the assimilated family clung to their conviction that is was themselves who represented the 'real Germany' -- cultured, broad-minded, etc. -- and the thuggish Nazis who were the anomaly. But the Nazis had the power, and Gay was forced to deal with the way they proposed to solve their "Jewish Question". Decades after his family finally fled, he responds by addressing his own "German Question" in this thoughtful memoir.

Gay's book goes well beyond the navel-gazing and self-indulgent whimperings of many of the current memoirists. He is writing both for himself and for an outside audience, and addressing different questions for both. Why didn't the family leave earlier? Why should they have been forced to leave, to recognize that something like Auschwitz could be created by the very nation to which they considered themselves to belong? he responds, indignantly. Indeed, that raises a provocative question in a society that still grapples with the question of how to deal equitably with refugees. One otherwise intelligent person I know wondered aloud, during the days of attempted ethnic cleansing of Bosnia and later Kosovo, why people just didn't all leave when they saw the writing on the wall. My response was -- and remains -- why should they have? It was their home.

Gay tells us what made Berlin home for him for his earliest years -- the chocolate desserts, the movies, flying a kite -- and how, very gradually, the city that once was his home became an alien land. Ultimately, he ends up taking refuge in his stamp collection (dominated by tropical islands), cheering for British football teams over their German rivals, and navigating the paperwork that will be necessary to help his family reach safety. The most gripping pages are undoubtedly those in which their departure is recounted, particularly the implications of Gay's father's decision to leave two weeks earlier than planned on a different ship.

The real story underlying the events that Gay recounts is one of a different kind of survival than the more classic Holocaust narrative. Gay didn't have to go into hiding, dart from one refuge to another, embark on any heroic battles or join a Resistance group. But his story, while much more mundane in some ways, is just as powerful because it is the story of so many European Jews during this period: he had to find a way to live with himself, both during the 1930s and in the decades that followed. He had to survive, psychologically and emotionally, or the Nazis would have triumphed even if they hadn't managed to force him into a gas chamber. It's the story of how Gay overcame the trauma of his ordinary life become distorted beyond recognition during the Berlin of 1933 and 1939 that is ultimately the most moving part of the book -- in particular, how he was able to bring himself toward a partial reconciliation with postwar Germany.

Highly recommended as a compelling and highly personal memoir. It would be interesting to read this in conjunction with memoirs or fiction by those who grew up in Germany as heirs to the Nazi era, such as What Did You Do in the War, Daddy?: Growing Up in Germany or The Reader (Oprah's Book Club) (now a movie that I also highly recommend, having seen a preview last week.)
Qusserel
I usually make a point of not re-reading other Amazon reviews before writing my own review of a book I've just finished, but in this case, for some reason, I strayed from my usual practice...

I'm surprised that few of my fellow reviewers have mentioned how amusing Peter Gay's book is - this is the one aspect that drew me in when I finally got around to reading "My German Question" - his description of projecting anti-semitism on a German money changer when returning to Germany as an adult. I found his self-deprecating self-analysis very funny and very entertaining.

Many people, including non-jews, who pay attention to such things, feel ambivalent about modern Germany. I myself, an erstwhile German Literature scholar, have said things in anger that could probably get me arrested (I have since been told that it is actually illegal to call someone a Nazi in Germany today), to a native who had taken my seat at the Hofbrauhaus. One of the minor disappointments of my life was to discover that Germans today are not obsessed with the question of German collective guilt - that Germany exists only in the novels of Heinrich Boell, from what I can tell.

I agree with those who have noted that Gay has a tendency to tell us that times were tough, without really describing what specifically was tough about it, in detail. We read a lot about his strategies for coping with his isolation as a Jew in Nazi Germany, and I found this very interesting, but I missed seeing more description of what it was exactly he was coping with.

The book makes a very interesting companion to Wolfgang Samuel's "German Boy" and especially "Coming to Colorado" which I also read recently. It's ironic that both Samuels and Gay should end up in Denver, of all places.

One minor frustration with this paperback edition: the book is tall and thin, an annoying form factor that I did not enjoy holding. I probably would not buy this book if I had picked it up browsing in a bookstore, and I put off reading it after ordering from Amazon simply because I didn't like the shape. In the end however, I'm glad I overcame this deterrent!
Yar
Some readers were disappointed with this book, because it does not explain why and what happened to Jews in Nazi Germany; what it does is give a highly personal account of Gay's "growing up in Nazi Berlin". At first the normalcy of the family described here may seem disappointing, but this changes when the Nazis declare a family of fervent atheists to be Jews. Gay's book explains how he survived psychically in a country which said he was worthless; and he points out what kept his family from leaving before 1939. The answers to those two questions are important contributions to our understanding of Nazi Germany.
Supporting the local Berlin football team is more than just that when it is one of the very few means of belonging, of not being singled out. And watching the 1936 Olympics is different when all you hope for is that it will prove that Aryans are not as superior as they keep telling you every day.
I feel grateful for this book. Peter Gay came to hate the Germans who would have killed him if his father had not managed to get the family out of Germany; this memoir, however, by telling us who and what helped him survive, also tells us what was once beautiful about Germany.
Dont_Wory
Mostly very good-perceptive, insightful, even profound at times.