» » Frederick II: A Medieval Emperor (Oxford Paperbacks)

Download Frederick II: A Medieval Emperor (Oxford Paperbacks) fb2

by David Abulafia
Download Frederick II: A Medieval Emperor (Oxford Paperbacks) fb2
Historical
  • Author:
    David Abulafia
  • ISBN:
    0195080408
  • ISBN13:
    978-0195080407
  • Genre:
  • Publisher:
    Oxford University Press; First Paperback Edition edition (November 26, 1992)
  • Pages:
    480 pages
  • Subcategory:
    Historical
  • Language:
  • FB2 format
    1904 kb
  • ePUB format
    1357 kb
  • DJVU format
    1651 kb
  • Rating:
    4.8
  • Votes:
    545
  • Formats:
    docx txt lrf lrf


I would definitely recommend Frederick II: A Medieval Emperor to anyone.

I would definitely recommend Frederick II: A Medieval Emperor to anyone.

Frederick II of Hohenstaufen, Holy Roman Emperor, King of Sicily, King of Jerusalem, has, since his death in 1250, enjoyed a reputation as one of the most remarkable monarchs in the history of Europe. But as David Abulafia shows in this powerfully written biography, Frederick was much less tolerant and far-sighted in his cultural, religious, and political.

Paperback, 480 pages. David Abulafia's Frederick II: A Medieval Emperor is a well-written, if somewhat iconoclastic, biography. Published November 26th 1992 by Oxford University Press, USA (first published 1988). The book's subtitle is meant as more than just a chronological identifier; Abulafia sets out to show that Frederick's reputation as a Renaissance man avant la lettre, a secular-leaning genius renowned for his moderate treatment of Jews and Muslims, is an undeserved one.

frederick ii. Collection. frederick ii. Identifier. ark:/13960/t4bp7td96. Ocr. ABBYY FineReader 1. (Extended OCR).

Frederick Second : A Medieval Emperor. Select Format: Hardcover. I used this book as background-studies for a paper I wrote on Frederick II. I especially liked the way Abulafia remains objective to this great personality, compared to other writers(as Kantorowitz).

Frederick II: A Medieval Emperor (Oxford Paperbacks). Frederick H Buttel, Philip David McMichael. Категория: Общественные науки прочие, Социология.

Abulafia has now written, published by Penguin in the UK and by Oxford University Press in the US in October 2019.

Frederick II: a medieval emperor abulafia, david oxford university press oxford 1992 466 S-00000326 o 0195080408 norman german frederick barbarossa henry VI roman.

FREDERICK II: A MEDIEVAL EMPEROR ABULAFIA, DAVID OXFORD UNIVERSITY PRESS OXFORD 1992 466 S-00000326 O 0195080408 NORMAN GERMAN FREDERICK BARBAROSSA HENRY VI ROMAN EMPIRE JERUSALEM SICILY Promoting the study of medieval genealogy and prosopography. Frederick II: a Medieval Emperor. Author: Abulafia, David Publisher: Oxford University Press. Cover Type: Soft Year published: 1992 ISBN: 0195080408. Located in: Books Books.

In this book, the eminent Cambridge medievalist David Abulafia offers a valuable reassessment ofthe Emperor Frederick . Powered by the California Digital Library University of California. Frederick 11: a Medieval Emperor

In this book, the eminent Cambridge medievalist David Abulafia offers a valuable reassessment ofthe Emperor Frederick II (1194-1250), one of the most complex. UCLA UCLA Historical Journal Title David Abulafia. Frederick 11: a Medieval Emperor. London and Allen Lane the Penguin Press, 1988, 446. New York: p.

Frederick II of Hohenstaufen, Holy Roman Emperor, King of Sicily, King of Jerusalem, has, since his death in 1250, enjoyed a reputation as one of the most remarkable monarchs in the history of Europe. His wide cultural tastes, his apparent tolerance of Jews and Muslims, his defiance of the papacy, and his supposed aim of creating a new, secular world order make him a figure especially attractive to contemporary historians. But as David Abulafia shows in this powerfully written biography, Frederick was much less tolerant and far-sighted in his cultural, religious, and political ambitions than is generally thought. Here, Frederick is revealed as the thorough traditionalist he really was: a man who espoused the same principles of government as his twelfth-century predecessors, an ardent leader of the Crusades, and a king as willing to make a deal with Rome as any other ruler in medieval Europe. Frederick's realm was vast. Besides ruling the region of Europe that encompasses modern Germany, Czechoslovakia, Poland, eastern France, and northern Italy, he also inherited the Kingdom of Sicily and parts of the Mediterranean that include what are now Israel, Lebanon, Malta, and Cyprus. In addition, his Teutonic knights conquered the present-day Baltic States, and he even won influence along the coasts of Tunisia. Abulafia is the first to place Frederick in the wider historical context his enormous empire demands. Frederick's reign, Abulafia clearly shows, marked the climax of the power struggle between the medieval popes and the Holy Roman Emperors, and the book stresses Frederick's steadfast dedication to the task of preserving both dynasty and empire. Through the course of this rich, groundbreaking narrative, Frederick emerges as less of the innovator than he is usually portrayed. Rather than instituting a centralized autocracy, he was content to guarantee the continued existence of the customary style of government in each area he ruled: in Sicily he appeared a mighty despot, but in Germany he placed his trust in regional princes, and never dreamed of usurping their power. Abulafia shows that this pragmatism helped bring about the eventual transformation of medieval Europe into modern nation-states. The book also sheds new light on the aims of Frederick in Italy and the Near East, and concentrates as well on the last fifteen years of the Emperor's life, a period until now little understood. In addition, Abulfia has mined the papal registers in the Secret Archive of the Vatican to provide a new interpretation of Frederick's relations with the papacy. And his attention to Frederick's register of documents from 1239-40--a collection hitherto neglected--has yielded new insights into the cultural life of the German court. In the end, a fresh and fascinating picture develops of the most enigmatic of German rulers, a man whose accomplishments have been grossly distorted over the centuries.

Winn
This 1988 biography of Frederick II Emperor of the Holy Roman Empire. Frederick II reigned as emperor from 1215 C. E. (in the Current Era) until 1250 C.E. The major benefit of this book over other earlier biographies of Frederick II is the fact that Professor David Abulafia had unique access to the papal registers of Frederick II's documents for the years from 1239 C.E.to 1240 C.E. which are currently held in the Vatican. Professor Abulafia studied these registers extensively and relied on the information gathered from these registers to write this book. Accordingly, this book offers a unique biography of Frederick II, especially for the years of 1239 C.E. through 1240 C.E., of Frederick's reign.
FreandlyMan
This book is not for general readers interested in history. It's too detailed. But the detail makes it very good for serious historians. It is not the same kind of book as A Distant Mirror, which IS for general readers interested in history, and which got me interested in history for the general reader (there's a lot of this kind of history book).
Altad
This book is generally acknowledged as an excellent, recent account of the life of Frederick II. Frederick is famous in the German-speaking world for being an inspiration to the Nazi party. The earlier biography by Kantorowicz(who later taught in America), was seized on by Nazi's and Nazi sympathizers in support for a strong, mystical leader who would bring Germany back to greatness. Although Abulafia notes this troubled history in the notes, he account is mostly concerned with Frederick II's actual life and times. In a way, he is trying to debunk the superstition and legend that was built up around Frederick II in the early part of the twentieth century.

So who was Frederick II? He was the heir to the kingdom of Sicily and the Holy Roman Empire. He managed to unify his vast kingdom during his lifetime, he re-conquered Jerusalem without a fight, he wrote a subperb book on Falconry, corresponded with Arab scholars and, oh yes, fought bitterly with a succesion of Popes who just hated his guts.

In fact, these Popes, more then Frederick himself, emerge as the focal point of this book. More then anything it was their unreasoning hatred for Frederick's power that defined his life. Particularly, it seemed like Frederick spent the majority of his life fighting rebels in Lombardy who were supported by the Pope.

Recommended.
Honeirsil
A thorough and for the most part interesting book to read that explores Frederick 's life and rule and the years immediately before and after. It is clear he is in dialogue with and refuting earlier biographers. Some chapters on Frederick 's later conflicts with the pope tend to drag.
Usishele
Abulafia has written a wonderful biography of one of the most important rulers of European history. His biography is detailed and precise, a well documented look at Frederick's life from childhood to his death, even ending the book with a great chapter to quickly tell what happened to the Hohenstaufen dynasty. Throughout the book you get an even non-biased representation of what Abulafia interpreted through his extensive research.

I did feel that there were two chapters out of place and did not belong in the scope of the biography. Towards the end we read "Culture at Court" and "Remote Control". "Culture at Court" is a nice chapter to evaluate the culture of the times - such as falconry, hunting, music, poetry, fashion - but did not add anything to the biography of Frederick II. "Remote Control" reads more like an appendix chapter to explain the registers and how much of the information is known. Both chapters are good but they do not figure into the overall structure that Abulafia used to write about Frederick II.

I am amazed to see this book trashed because one reviewer calls Abulafia a revisionist. Is not history furthered through new research and interpretations? Or should we accept the prevailing notion of history revolving around a subject as the one and true way? Abulafia has looked at the facts and interpreted them the way he saw it, and his arguments are very sound. I've always saw Frederick II this way and agree with Abulafia's interpretation. If you don't like a book because of its research or prose than discredit the book, but not because a historian writes a different view than the prevailing view.

All in all this biography is one of the better ones I have read and I thoroughly enjoyed it. I would definitely recommend Frederick II: A Medieval Emperor to anyone.

4.5 stars.
Malojurus
I found the book by David Abalafia, if a medieval emperor, exceeded my expectation, and the intrecet details iod that time and family names used, bought the era of that time to life, excellent book, I would personally give the book a 4 star rating.