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by Michael Lowry
Download Fighting Through to Kohima: A Memoir of War in India and Burma fb2
Historical
  • Author:
    Michael Lowry
  • ISBN:
    1844150038
  • ISBN13:
    978-1844150038
  • Genre:
  • Publisher:
    Pen and Sword; First Edition edition (February 19, 2004)
  • Pages:
    224 pages
  • Subcategory:
    Historical
  • Language:
  • FB2 format
    1143 kb
  • ePUB format
    1760 kb
  • DJVU format
    1379 kb
  • Rating:
    4.8
  • Votes:
    342
  • Formats:
    azw docx docx mobi


The book deals with his experiences in India and Burma, until a medical issue takes him out of the wa. This book portrays a great insight into the British fighting forces against Japan.

The book deals with his experiences in India and Burma, until a medical issue takes him out of the war. Lowry describes everything in detail, all the horror and humour of war that seem to go strangely hand in hand, as well as detailing the tactics and equipment used by the British and Indian troops. Often referred to as the forgotten 14th Army, it illustrates the struggles and hardships endured, alongside absolute courage and determination to win through.

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The Japanese advance into Burma threatened India and along with many thousands of British and Colonial troops Lowry found himself fighting in the Arakan region. Conditions were appalling and the fighting was extremely bitter by any standards. This author is extraordinarily lucky to be alive! All those who read this splendid Second World War memoir will doubtless come to the same view. After joining up in 1939 with the Queen's Royal Regiment the Author was posted to the North West Frontier of India where he cut his teeth chasing Pathan tribesman bandit gangs for two years. This was exciting enough but only a taste of what was to come.

Michael Lowry MC MBE, was awarded the Military Cross for his role in the desperate defensive action at Kohima, rated the . This is a fascinating and inspiring book, one of the most action-packed memoirs of the war in Burma ever published.

Michael Lowry MC MBE, was awarded the Military Cross for his role in the desperate defensive action at Kohima, rated the worst of the campaign in Burma. After joining up in 1939 with the Queen's Royal Regiment, the Author was posted to the North West Frontier of India where he cut his teeth chasing gangs of Pathan bandits for two years. As the Japanese advanced into Burma, Lowry found himself fighting in the Arakan region, where his battalion was cut off by the Japanese for three weeks.

book by Michael Lowry. Lt. Col. Michael Lowry MC MBE, was awarded the Military Cross for his role in the desperate defensive action at Kohima, rated the worst of the campaign in Burma.

He self-deprecatingly described his books as "holes held together with string". a b Michael Lowry (19 January 2009). Fighting Through to Kohima: A Memoir of War in India and Burma. p. 8. ISBN 978-1-84415-802-7.

He self-deprecatingly described his books as "holes held together with string" He died on 21 January 2018 at the age of 9. Conditions were appalling and the fighting was extremely bitter by any standards

The Japanese advance into Burma threatened India and along with many thousands of British and Colonial troops Lowry found himself fighting in the Arakan region. His Battalion was cut off by the Japs for three weeks but refused to surrender yet even worse was to come as the Battalion was thrown into the thick of the action at Kohima which is rated as the most desperate defensive action for the campaign. In one week 173 members of this Battalion were lost.

Fighting through to Kohima. a memoir of war in India and Burma. Published 2003 by L. Cooper in Barnsley, S. Yorkshire. 1 2 3 4 5. Want to Read. Are you sure you want to remove Fighting through to Kohima from your list? Fighting through to Kohima.

Lt. Col. Michael Lowry MC MBE, was awarded the Military Cross for his role in the desperate defensive action at Kohima, rated the worst of the campaign in Burma. After joining up in 1939 with the Queen's Royal Regiment, the Author was posted to the North West Frontier of India where he cut his teeth chasing gangs of Pathan bandits for two years. As the Japanese advanced into Burma, Lowry found himself fighting in the Arakan region, where his battalion was cut off by the Japanese for three weeks. Having survived that, next came the action at Kohima where during one week Lowry's battalion lost 173 members. Lowry was seriously wounded in the conflict but fortunately lived to tell the tale.This is a fascinating and inspiring book, one of the most action-packed memoirs of the war in Burma ever published.

Flamekiller
Born of a decorated WW1 veteran, Lowry led an idyllic inter-war life. He was fortunate to attend good quality schools and live in some wonderful English settings. He played cricket and tennis and holidayed with his family in France. As was often the British way, in time of war he repaid his life of privilege by becoming an officer in the army. By the Declaration he had been posted to serve with 2nd Queens Battalion in India on the Northwest Frontier.

I hadn't realized that this was still, even in 1939, a dangerous posting. The tribes frequently caused trouble and the army had only tenuous control of this vast area. In addition German and Italian agents promoted further trouble and Lowry sees a number of skirmishes. It is a remarkable part of his story altogether.

By the time his unit is transferred to Arakan (33rd Bde, 7th Indian Div), Lowry is a company commander and serves in this role in action against the Japanese. One of the standout elements of this book is the revelation of what it meant to conduct patrols in the jungle. The extensive planning is incredible. It is also fascinating to read of the author's thoughts as he positions his men for battle. Several times his unit is cut off by major Japanese offensives and has to survive as best it can. There are both lengthy offensive and defensive phases and as such this book offers something different to the many US accounts (post-Guadalcanal at least) of the Pacific War.

One thing that also stood out was the remarkable quality of the British regular army. It seems the Queens were a particularly impressive regiment too and Lowry reveals what made it so. Again, it is fascinating to compare the differences in the national armies, for instance the efforts the British went to feed and supply their troops, compared to that usually experienced by US soldiers. There are also some interesting observations of the Japanese.

While Lowry certainly participates in combat, his role was to command and most of the fighting he writes about, is of men following his orders. While casualties seem to have been generally less than the norm for North/West Europe, Burma was certainly no soft option and Lowry loses many men and friends (some of these die terribly, so this is no sanitized account). Indeed, it was fascinating reading him question whether any of his decisions were responsible. So the whole gamut of command is covered.

There is a real quality to this memoir. It deals with a theatre that receives little attention and it does so through the eyes of a very professional officer and a very articulate writer. Highly Recommended. 4 stars
Winail
Not much that you haven't already read but still a good read.
Cenneel
This book is very informative and interesting. It puts readers right there with those who fought. Well written. It's not about generals; it's about men and what they went through on the firing line.
Vetitc
One of the more interesting memoirs.
elektron
The British Army. at its best
Natety
Point of view from an English clubman British high classes.Some europeans fighted after tea time but the Indians and Ghurkas were the real heroes.The Japs de best soldiers,with much less elements and far from their sources.
Andromakus
The harrowing ordeals that these men fought through in Burma, and write about with no exaggerations - even when probably deserved - sorely deserve our praise. While a compelling and enjoyable read, and, in my case, read for research, the primary appreciation I gained was one of inspiration. In that how any of these men survived at all is astounding, and survived to return to a normal life is downright astonishing. How times have changed. My uncle did not so return, however, but the thought of him alongside men such as these instils a deep sense of selfish pride, and the hope that he at least understood the values these men would pass on to the world. It is up to us not to forget that, which is the least we can do. It is memoirs such as these that we should read so as not to make those mistakes again. But, even though those mistakes will be remade, countless times, no doubt, it is history at its best; firsthand, unadulterated, pure in its brutality and yet spirited in the darkness of its humour.
A somewhat dry book of one mans thoughts and actions in combat with the Japanese in a place most Americans have never heard of. It was written by an Englishman basically for an English audience and uses some words most Americans wouldn't understand. Luckily, I lived in England for a total of six years, so that didn't bother me. All in all, it's a reasonably good WW2 book and is informative about the Englishmans war against the Japanese in that part of the world.