Download Thomas Becket fb2

by William Urry
Download Thomas Becket fb2
Historical
  • Author:
    William Urry
  • ISBN:
    075092179X
  • ISBN13:
    978-0750921794
  • Genre:
  • Publisher:
    Sutton Publishing; Illustrated edition edition (September 25, 1999)
  • Pages:
    208 pages
  • Subcategory:
    Historical
  • Language:
  • FB2 format
    1689 kb
  • ePUB format
    1380 kb
  • DJVU format
    1858 kb
  • Rating:
    4.9
  • Votes:
    382
  • Formats:
    mobi azw lrf rtf


An expert on negotiation and mediation, William Ury has a passion for helping people get to Yes. He translates decades of experience into simple, easy-to-understand techniques, strategies, and tips that can help transform your personal and professional relationships.

An expert on negotiation and mediation, William Ury has a passion for helping people get to Yes. Getting to Yes with Yourself (and Other Worthy Opponents).

Details (if other): Cancel. Thanks for telling us about the problem.

Focusing on the last month of Becket's life after his return to Canterbury, the author describes the dispute that broke out with renewed ferocity culminating in his murder in the Cathedral by four of the King's knights and concludes with.

From inside the book.

William Ury - I read your books and know you helped difficult .

William Ury - I read your books and know you helped difficult conve. ations in Latin America before.

William Urry's "Becket" is all the better because Urry was a long-time resident, and lover, of Canterbury. A book packed with this much detail is usually intended for scholars, but "Thomas Becket" makes a fine read for a general audience. He had previously co-authored a book about leading citizens of the town from the Anglo-Saxon period through the middle ages. William Urry's "Becket" is all the better because Urry was a long-time resident, and lover, of Canterbury.

Thomas Becket, William Warham and the Crisis of the Early Tudor Church. raphy, source-book for countless homilists, the Golden legend. Caxton printed an English translation in, with a greatly expanded treatment. TNA, SP /, fo. r (LP viii. University of Warwick E-mail: . arshallick.

Home Browse Books Book details, Thomas Becket: Archbishop of Canterbury. Many kind friends have written to me during the last fifteen years about my book, and here I venture especially to thank that most learned and generous helper of others, Dr Reginald Lane Poole. Thomas Becket: Archbishop of Canterbury. By William Holden Hutton.

Thomas Becket was the Archbishop of Canterbury from 1162 until his assassination in 1170. This biography of Thomas Becket provides detailed information about his childhood, life, achievements, works & timeline. Birthday: December 21, 1118.

Thomas Becket (/ˈbɛkɪt/), also known as Saint Thomas of Canterbury, Thomas of London and later Thomas à Becket (21 December c. 1119 (or 1120) – 29 December 1170), was Archbishop of Canterbury from 1162 until his murder in 1170

Thomas Becket (/ˈbɛkɪt/), also known as Saint Thomas of Canterbury, Thomas of London and later Thomas à Becket (21 December c. 1119 (or 1120) – 29 December 1170), was Archbishop of Canterbury from 1162 until his murder in 1170. He is venerated as a saint and martyr by both the Catholic Church and the Anglican Communion. He engaged in conflict with Henry II, King of England, over the rights and privileges of the Church and was murdered by followers of the king in Canterbury Cathedral

"The murder of Archbishop Thomas Becket in his cathedral at Canterbury in December 1170 was one of the most momentous events in medieval European history. News of it spread like wildfire throughout Christendom, and the chroniclers of the age vied with one another to report how and why it had happened. For centuries the shrine of St. Thomas drew an unceasing stream of pilgrims to Canterbury, and even today the first object of many visitors to the cathedral is to see the Martyrdom, the spot where the murder took place."--BOOK JACKET. "Drawing not only on the array of contemporary accounts but also on his own unrivalled knowledge of the local scene, William Urry tells here in gripping detail the full story of the fateful month of December 1170, its aftermath and its legacy."--BOOK JACKET.

Skilkancar
What makes this book particularly appealing is that this was released after the authors death. It was the admiration and dedication of Mayr-Harting is resonsible for the book's release, and the reader is thankful for it. After a moving Introduction about Urrey and his love of Canterbury by Mayr-Harding, the book starts and does not let go.
This book is perfect for armchair historians who know about the martyrdom and wants to know "what really happened". It is highly detailed, but not to the point of boredom. And it is blessedly edited for a reader, not a scholar. While the author seems to have definite opinions about certain figures, he is decidedly neutral about Becket, stating events as they occur. But, after reading this book, one comes away with a much shrewder version of the Saint. It's pretty clear that Thomas knew he was going to die and he was not going away quietly. Even though you know what is going to happen, it actually builds tension. Urrey spares nothing as he graphically (and I do mean graphic!)describes the murder. Which brings me to my only complaint. The author gives and enjoyable and fascinating background to the four murderers, but does not give any information on them after the murder. Not even a "no more records are given after this."
That aside, I highly recommend this book. It's a shame that the author is no longer with us. I would love to have heard what else he would have liked to say.
Ce
A book packed with this much detail is usually intended for scholars, but "Thomas Becket" makes a fine read for a general audience. William Urry's "Becket" is all the better because Urry was a long-time resident, and lover, of Canterbury. He had previously co-authored a book about leading citizens of the town from the Anglo-Saxon period through the middle ages. Urry's other books about the town to which Becket's name is inextricably linked include, "A Pictorial Guide to Canterbury Cathedral," "Christopher Marlowe and Canterbury," and "Canterbury Under the Angevin Kings." These, of course, include Henry II, Becket's dearest friend turned nemesis. Urry died before he could publish his impressive "Thomas Becket." For that, readers owe much to Urry's friend, Henry Mayr-Harting, who wrote the Foreword.

Robert Fripp, author of
"Power of a Woman. Memoirs of a turbulent life: Eleanor of Aquitaine"