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by Tulku Chagdud
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Ethnic & National
  • Author:
    Tulku Chagdud
  • ISBN:
    1881847004
  • ISBN13:
    978-1881847007
  • Genre:
  • Publisher:
    Padma Pub (October 1, 1992)
  • Pages:
    248 pages
  • Subcategory:
    Ethnic & National
  • Language:
  • FB2 format
    1371 kb
  • ePUB format
    1226 kb
  • DJVU format
    1555 kb
  • Rating:
    4.6
  • Votes:
    914
  • Formats:
    mobi mbr rtf txt


The late Chagdud Tulku has left one of the best Tibetan memoirs for u.

The late Chagdud Tulku has left one of the best Tibetan memoirs for us. Non Buddhists can read it a bit like an adventure story or another autobiography or perhaps to get a clearer picture of the communist takeover. The Rinpoches narrative take us to the old traditional Tìbet with all his adventures, great difficulty, losts, and the magic of an almost extinct spiritual tradition and culture that came to West in the form of this Yogi of Ilusion. A book for all buddhist practitioners, that teach us how to develop our spiritual qualities throug the hardest challenges of life.

It was here that Chagdud Tulku offered the empowerments and oral transmissions of the Dudjom Treasures in 1991, and several years later, of. .Lord of the Dance: Autobiography of a Tibetan Lama.

It was here that Chagdud Tulku offered the empowerments and oral transmissions of the Dudjom Treasures in 1991, and several years later, of the supreme Dzogchen cycle, Nyingt'hig Yabzhi. In 1992 he received an invitation to teach in Brazil and he would become a pioneer insofar as spreading the Dharma in South America. Throughout the 1990s he maintained an extensive teaching schedule, put some of his senior students into three year retreats, and helped to establish many Chagdud Gonpa centers throughout the Western Hemisphere.

Lord of the Dance : The Autobiography of a Tibetan Lama. com User, June 19, 1997. It's also an inspiring story of the human spirit, containing extraordinary wisdom amidst the humor, joy and pain of this ordinary but very special life.

Lord of tlie 'Dance The Autobiography of a Tibetan Lama. Published by Padma Publishing . First published in 1992 All rights reserved. Chagdud Tulku Rinpoche, as the sixteenth incarnation of the original founder of that monastery, set up the first seat of Chagdud Gonpa in the West at River House (later renamed Dechhen Ling) in Cottage Grove, Oregon.

Lord of the Dance book. Lord of the Dance: The Autobiography of a Tibetan Lama. Son of Dawa Drolma, one of Tibet's most renowned female lamas, Chagdud Rinpoche was recognized early in life as a tulku or incarnation of a realized master. Forced into exile by the Chinese invasion his was the last generation to inherit the highest teaching and methods of Buddhism in Tibet. This is his autobiography.

Lord of the Dance: The Autobiography of a Tibetan Lama. Lord of the Dance is Chagdud Tulku Rinpoche’s memoir of his life in Tibet, his escape from the Chinese Communist invasion, his years as a refugee in India and Nepal, and his return visit to his homeland twenty-eight years later. Recognized at the age of three as a tulku, an incarnation of a high lama, Rinpoche’s extraordinary dreams and visions-some of them terrifying and with clairvoyant qualities-created a wealth of inner experience and transcendent generosity. But he was also a young boy whose untamed actions could be unbelievably naughty.

Son of Dawa Drolma, one of Tibet's most renowned female lamas, Chagdud Rinpoche was recognized early in life as a "tulku", or incarnation of a realized master, and was rigorously trained by many great lamas

Son of Dawa Drolma, one of Tibet's most renowned female lamas, Chagdud Rinpoche was recognized early in life as a "tulku", or incarnation of a realized master, and was rigorously trained by many great lamas. Forced into exile by the Chinese invasion, his was the last generation to inherit the highest teachings and methods of Buddhism in Tibet. This candid autobiography helps Westerners understand the astonishing culture that is bound up with Vajrayana teachings.

Autobiography of a Tibetan Lama. For readers interested in the non-monastic or yogic style of Buddhist practice, Lord of the Dance provides a rich portrait of that style in its living cultural context. Lord of the Dance is the autobiography of a great ngakpa: Chagdud Tulku Rinpoche. He was known in the West for establishing thriving Dharma centres throughout North and South America. From an early age, Chagdud Tulku’s strong visionary experiences pointed him in the direction of a non-monastic life.

Bibliographic Details  . His Eminence Chagdud Tulku Rinpoche, a renowned and highly revered Vajrayana Buddhist Master, lived in exile in India and Nepal for two decades, serving his fellow refugees as both lama and physician.

Bibliographic Details Book Condition: Acceptable. He came to the West in 1979 at the invitation of American students, and in 1983 established Chagdud Gonpa Foundation, which now has over 20 centers around the world. Chagdud Tulku Rinpoche currently lives and teaches in Brazil. 100% satisfaction guaranteed!

Son of Dawa Drolma, one of Tibet's most renowned female lamas, Chagdud Rinpoche was recognized early in life as a "tulku", or incarnation of a realized master, and was rigorously trained by many great lamas. Forced into exile by the Chinese invasion, his was the last generation to inherit the highest teachings and methods of Buddhism in Tibet. This candid autobiography helps Westerners understand the astonishing culture that is bound up with Vajrayana teachings.

Winn
A very engaging story about how things were in Tibet before and leading up to the invasion by China. Chagdud Tulku comes across as a humble and sincere practitioner, and his stories about his life and the masters he studied with and encountered make one realize what is truly possible for humans, and what's truly important. He also makes it clear how an authentic teacher of Buddhism behaves in relation to his or her own practice, his or her students, and his or her relations the teachings which was good to read about.

I am very grateful that he shared his story, and for the people who helped make it possible. Reading it increased my determination to work with an authentic teacher.
Uanabimo
I give 5 stars for the detail and the honesty. It is great to know more about Chagdud Tulku and especially interesting to hear some of the stories from when he was a child. Having read the story of his mother's experience in the book "Delog", it is interesting to see another aspect to her character here. I wouldn't have thought she would be such a strict mother, but, then again, I wouldn't have expected Chagdud Tulku of stabbing anyone when he was a child, either. :)
Juce
The late Chagdud Tulku has left one of the best Tibetan memoirs for us. Non Buddhists can read it a bit like an adventure story or another autobiography or perhaps to get a clearer picture of the communist takeover. Buddhists from altogether different traditions can read it to glimpse the on-the-spot teachings dealing with duality and the magical benefits entering the human psyche through dreams & visions.
This is a great gift to us practitioners. He mentions many of his retreats in practices that we do now. These amazing systems that he and many others have brought out into the west to share. Also for people who have leanings in these directions it clearly shows that a system exists and has existed and is accessible, there are options for the questioning mind.

Doing practice is great however reading some books ABOUT Buddhism is dull indeed. This book is a gem. I hope some of his magnetism finds its way directly to many readers. He was awesome in real life.
MOQ
This is a newer version with updated information. They kept in all the old photos. Well Done!
Kiaile
Amazing!
VariesWent
Love this book!
Zulkigis
The Rinpoches narrative take us to the old traditional Tìbet with all his adventures, great difficulty, losts, and the magic of an almost extinct spiritual tradition and culture that came to West in the form of this Yogi of Ilusion. A book for all buddhist practitioners, that teach us how to develop our spiritual qualities throug the hardest challenges of life.
Only lacks of more information and details over Rinpoches enlighted activity in the West, which has been added in the new revised edition.
This is a great story, on many levels - a personal adventure, a spiritual journey, a cultural history, - it is engaging and fun to read but it also has some major faults. Perhaps I notice these so much because I read this directly after finishing Tulku Urgyen's wonderful memoir Blazing Splendor: The Memoirs of Tulku Urgyen Rinpoche. That spiritual/cultural memoir was so good I wanted to start reading it again as soon as I finished it (subtle, humorous, understated and deep), but that is a different book. I mention this for perspective. This tale (and Lama) is different, more dramatic and revealing (grandiose even, and not the "hidden yogi" as was Tulku Urgyen's ideal), but I also get the strong sense of the story being retold for a select audience. I had a harder time hearing Chagdud Tulku's voice in the telling, instead often thinking more of the interpreters and editors. This lack of authenticity is irritating, yet the story is so engaging that this can be ignored most of the time.

Another complaint of mine is that the story is rich in detail in the few years leading up to and following Rinpoche's escape, but seriously lacking once he comes to the West. Instead of covering the transmission of the teachings to Westerners (itself probably a fascinating aspect of any Tibetan Lama's life, and so far something I haven't read much detail about), and all the places he visited and activities he accomplished in the last third of his life, he only mentions returning to Tibet to visit briefly in 1987, and makes only passing reference to his Western students (other than his wife Jane). Eventhough it was probably a big deal for him personally - in terms of Chagdud Tulku's dharma activity, this return to Tibet (and a monastery he was only peripherally connected to in this life) was a minor event compared to the students and practice centers he established in North and South America! I was left feeling only half the story had been told. (Perhaps since the story was filtered through these very students they were reluctant to ask for or write about their own part of his story. This is a shame).

It would be nice if any new edition had an afterword included to summerize his impact and experience in the West as well as give a better, more objective, overview of his accomplishments. Chagdud Rinpoche was a true renaissance man - not only a tantric and dzogchen master, but also an energetic and tireless teacher, puja leader (and umze), builder (dharma center establisher), artist (sculptor, painter, singer and story teller), and traditional medical doctor. This range and depth of experience really doesn't come across in this memoir. As well, some maps of Tibet, Nepal and India showing his place of birth and route of escape, to help make his life and travels more understandable, would make any new edition much better.

Even more bothering is how this tale, although told with candor, also reinforces the stereotype of Tibet being a land of faith, magic and mystery and the West being a place of practical work, drives and emotions. It would have been interesting to hear the same kind of mystic/dream/synchronistic stories told about his life in the West.

One of the most fascinating aspects of this memoir is how this Tulku was born with such amazing spiritual abilities and realized even more through this life's practice, but still had major personal mundane issues. Some examples are how he tried to kill his step-father as a small child, or as a young teen cheated a bit on his preliminary practices or as an adult wanted to punch someone for reprimanding him for standing on a cushion, while straining for a view, during a major empowerment at Samye Monastery. He only just held himself back remembering where he was, who he was with, and how he should behave, then he felt bad for such a negative reaction. This is great in many ways, it shows us that we are all normal people with ordinary delusions, it shows how some monks and lamas in Tibet had become somehow spoiled and corrupt in their privileged stature (and shows Chagdud Tulku's humanity and honesty and unease in this regard), it also shows that mere practice and realization isn't enough..... There is always the need for mindfulness, always the danger of ego's temptation and fall from grace. It is sobering to think a high lama who can tie knots in his sword is in many ways just like us....