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by Jill Ker Conway
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Ethnic & National
  • Author:
    Jill Ker Conway
  • ISBN:
    0749303603
  • ISBN13:
    978-0749303600
  • Genre:
  • Publisher:
    Methuen Publishing Ltd (October 4, 1990)
  • Pages:
    256 pages
  • Subcategory:
    Ethnic & National
  • Language:
  • FB2 format
    1319 kb
  • ePUB format
    1764 kb
  • DJVU format
    1483 kb
  • Rating:
    4.4
  • Votes:
    606
  • Formats:
    lrf txt lrf mbr


The Road From Coorain book.

The Road From Coorain book. A fantastic and engaging memoir showing how Jill Ker Conway's early years on the sheep farm in Coorain, Australia helped shape her into the academic she later became here in the United States. This book starts off beautifully with in depth descriptions of the harsh Australian outback, a place I've never been, but would like to go, and through Ms. Conway's words I was there. Then the book ends with Jill Ker Conway leaving for America at age 26.

In a memoir that pierces and delights us, Jill Ker Conway tells the story of her astonishing journey into . Worlds away from Coorain, in America, Jill Conway became a historian and the first woman president of Smith College

In a memoir that pierces and delights us, Jill Ker Conway tells the story of her astonishing journey into adulthood-a journey that would ultimately span immense distances and encompass worlds, ideas, and ways of life that seem a century apart. She was seven before she ever saw another girl child. Worlds away from Coorain, in America, Jill Conway became a historian and the first woman president of Smith College. Her story of Coorain and the road from Coorain startles by its passion and evocative power, by its understanding of the ways in which a total, deep-rooted commitment to place-or to a dream-can at once liberate and imprison.

The Road from Coorain. Jill Ker Conway is a noted historian, specializing in the experience of women in America, and was the first woman president of Smith College. Welcome to Gray City. The free online library containing 500000+ books. Read books for free from anywhere and from any device. Listen to books in audio format instead of reading.

Jill Ker Conway AC (9 October 1934 – 1 June 2018) was an Australian-American scholar and author. Well known for her autobiographies, in particular her first memoir, The Road from Coorain, she also was Smith College's first woman president (1975-1985) and most recently served as a visiting professor at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. In 2004 she was designated a Women's History Month Honoree by the National Women's History Project. She was a recipient of the National Humanities Medal.

Jill Ker Conway’s autobiography, The Road From Coorain, is a beautifully written memoir. The flow of the narrative and the broad vocabulary used throughout the book are exquisite

Jill Ker Conway’s autobiography, The Road From Coorain, is a beautifully written memoir. The flow of the narrative and the broad vocabulary used throughout the book are exquisite. Although the impact of her life story is sometimes slowed by her mother's wants and needs, these experiences helped shape Conway and, as such, are an integral part of her story. Societal attitudes toward women’s roles and acceptable occupations could have discouraged Conway from ever progressing.

In what way have they been destructive to the family? Though Conway finally rejected these values, is it possible that they helped her to break away from her potentially unproductive life and start again? 2. Conway stresses the fact that Australians of her parents' generation defined themselves a. . Conway stresses the fact that Australians of her parents' generation defined themselves as Britons and saw their own country only in British terms. They equated their national interests with England's; even their map of the world was seen from a British perspective, with nearby Japan located in the "Far East.

The Road from Coorain, which tells the story of Jill Ker Conway’s childhood and youth in Australia, is one of the most extraordinary . In 1930 Jill Ker Conway’s newly married parents bought the remote sheep station of Coorain.

The Road from Coorain, which tells the story of Jill Ker Conway’s childhood and youth in Australia, is one of the most extraordinary autobiographies of recent years. Written in a vivid, compelling style, it should prove particularly attractive to young American students who will be eager to compare the world Conway brings to life–foreign and exotic, yet in many ways oddly similar to their own–with the conventions and traditions of their own society.

The memoirs of Jill Conway and her journey into adulthood from a 30,000 acre sheep ranch in Coorain, Australia, to America where she became the first woman president of Smith College.

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I would have been unhappy working in one of the stuffiest parts of the Australian civil service

I would have been unhappy working in one of the stuffiest parts of the Australian civil service. r officers, and the colonial mentality with which I was so impatient dominated its culture. I needed a few hard knocks to foster a little humility and shatter the complacency which comes with being bright in a small society where there are few real competitors

Read online books written by Jill Ker Conway in our e-reader absolutely for free. Books by Jill Ker Conway: The Road From Coorain.

Read online books written by Jill Ker Conway in our e-reader absolutely for free. Author of The Road From Coorain at ReadAnyBook.

In this memoir the author describes her isolated childhood in the Australian outback. She became her father's farmhand, and when he died prematurely, she moved to Sydney, aged 11 years, and had to learn to adapt to a new and alien set of rules. Later she started drinking under the stress of looking after a depressive mother, then became involved in intellectual university life and began a reassessment of the political, cultural and spiritual ideas she had been brought up with. Eventually she became a successful career woman.

invasion
Summary: "Cursed be my intellect, affluence, and robust life experiences because there may never be someone so exceptional as to live up to my image of myself."

This one book is many books. It is a remarkable recollection of a young life in Australia. Then, in one of the nine chapters, it takes on a literary bent with brilliant and entertaining use of language. Often, it devolves into segments of self-pity as well as loathing toward others. Does that make it a psychological thriller, a mystery, or a narcissistic treatise? Discuss amongst yourselves and support your ideas, as the scholarly Jill Ker Conway probably charged her students and peers over the years.

Psychologically, the reader is presented a person who, through her twenties, couldn't be bothered to hold any work position for any length of time. Whether in law, political administration, fashion, education, or simpler tasks, some aspect of that work was beyond her tolerance. Such attitude is at least partly owed to the affluence that did not require her to work, but that is rarely raised as a factor.

The thrilling aspect of the psychological spaghetti in these pages is the roller coaster of angst poured out by the author, with the reader along for the ride. There is family, social, climate, political, historical, and enough other kinds of angst to fill a world's fair. That may be interesting (the angst or the fair), but one tires from a non-stop intake of it.

Mysteriously, we learn little depth about any characters surrounding the author other than her father during her astounding telling of early years on the Australian prairie, and of her mother as the anchor (with both good and bad meanings inferred) of her life. There are rarely more than brief mentions of others and name-dropping lists; nary a vignette to develop surrounding characters.

I relished the onsetting story set in the unfamiliar Antipodal pastoral land to which the first four chapters were devoted. I was thrilled by bits of artfully-crafted phrasing through that section, which then flourished in most of chapter five and made me feel I was on a journey through life that was discovering literary potential just as it might have evolved for the young lass as her life shifted toward education.

Yet by the end of chapter five to the final pages, the clarion call was that of the prototypical picture of the opera singer in preparation for a performance: "Me, me, me; Me, Me, Me!; Me, Me, ME!!" There was sound and fury but too little substance and story to mold a truly interesting tale despite the litany of subject matter that was mentioned.

Many readers will enjoy this exploration of soul by commentary. The author presents herself as an interesting character. I might have enjoyed the effort had there been more introspection and less outwardly-focused criticism. There were times when I was ready to recommend this work to a teenage relative in the United States, that she might appreciate another kind of life in another part of the world, presented by someone of intellect. Such desire was not there by the end of the book.
Hudora
I knew nothing about Jil Ker Conway until I heard an old interview with her on NPR shortly after she died, but it was enough to intrigue me. This first memoir of hers - I believe there are three - takes us up to the point where she leaves Australia and the clutches of her controlling mother. For me the first half of the book, her time on a desolate sheep farm in the outback, is the most intriguing section. The lengthy opening description of the outback is quite unlike anything I have ever come across and opened my mind to her reoccurring theme that Australia's fascination with English Christian culture was ridiculously out of place: "It is hard to imagine a kookaburra feeding St. Jerome or accompanying St. Francis. They belong to a physical and spiritual landscape which is outside the imagination of the Christian West."
Nejind
Jill Ker Conway’s autobiography, “The Road From Coorain”, is a beautifully written memoir. The flow of the narrative and the broad vocabulary used throughout the book are exquisite. Although the impact of her life story is sometimes slowed by her mother's wants and needs, these experiences helped shape Conway and, as such, are an integral part of her story.

Detailing her life growing up in the Australian outback during the second third of the twentieth century, Conway is able to draw the reader into that era. The beauty of the landscape and the harsh reality of the elements, the economic cycles, and the psychological impact on both men and women of these influences are vividly described. The elitism and the class differences between landed individuals and those who managed or worked on the stations become evident as the Conway family’s fortunes roller coaster between wealth and economic hardship.

Societal attitudes toward women’s roles and acceptable occupations could have discouraged Conway from ever progressing. However, Jill Ker Conway’s intellectual strength, coupled with her work ethic, propelled her beyond those roles accepted and available to women in the mid-twentieth century to becoming a university professor and eventually president of Smith College.

Today’s young women may view much of “The Road From Coorain” as ancient history. Women who came of age in the ‘60’s and ‘70’s may remember or may have experienced situations similar to those Conway encountered. All will be inspired by and amazed at Jill Ker Conway’s life and accomplishments.
Jeb
This book, The Road from Coorain, was a great fit for me as I too grew up on a sheep ranch and made a life off the ranch. The experience of growing up on the ranch affected the remainder of my life as growing up on a sheep station in Australia did the author. The isolation brought independence and inventiveness. The writing is descriptive and brings you to the scene--I could smell the odor of the lanolin at shearing time!
Uranneavo
When I finally got around to reading this book I really enjoyed it. I had assumed it would be an entertaining childhood story of life on a sheep station in Australia, but it was so much more. I should have known a woman of such achievement would have written an interesting, thought-provoking story. She not only shared her struggle as a woman in a male-dominated profession, but also a look inside the attitudes of the typical educated Australian in that era.This one is a keeper.
Stan
This was a book group selection for January. It is a fascinating story of Jil Ker who went on to be president of Smith College. She was born and raised in the outback of Australia and knew only a sheep ranchers life until age 11. Moving to the city and becoming a part of a traditional education system is new to her. This book also highlights her relationship with her family, especially her mother. I was disappointed when her story ended as she about to leave to come the U.S. to study but I've learned this is the first of 3 books and the others tell the rest of her story.