» » No Surrender: My Thirty-year War

Download No Surrender: My Thirty-year War fb2

by C.S. Terry,Hiroo Onoda
Download No Surrender: My Thirty-year War fb2
Ethnic & National
  • Author:
    C.S. Terry,Hiroo Onoda
  • ISBN:
    0233966978
  • ISBN13:
    978-0233966977
  • Genre:
  • Publisher:
    HarperCollins Distribution Services (June 5, 1975)
  • Pages:
    224 pages
  • Subcategory:
    Ethnic & National
  • Language:
  • FB2 format
    1779 kb
  • ePUB format
    1591 kb
  • DJVU format
    1224 kb
  • Rating:
    4.1
  • Votes:
    292
  • Formats:
    lrf lrf mobi doc


No Surrender: My Thirty-Y. has been added to your Cart. It's fascinating and most bizarre to read about the way Onoda's unit reacted to news they got from papers dropped by airplanes and from radios that they stole from villagers.

No Surrender: My Thirty-Y. The thought of Japanese defeat being inconceivable, they had constructed this entire alternate history to try to explain what they were seeing and why the "propaganda" lied about some things and not others.

Translated by Charles S. Terry. No surrender : my thirty-year war, Hiroo Onoda. p. cm. Bluejacket books. Originally published: Tokyo : New York : Kodansha International, 1974. Naval institute press. World War, 1939-1945-Personal narratives, Japanese. World War, s-Lubang Island. Soldiers-Japan Biography.

We’re dedicated to reader privacy so we never track you.

Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read

Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read. Start by marking No Surrender: My Thirty-Year War as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read.

Books, images, historic newspapers, maps, archives and more. In the spring of 1974, Second Lieutenant Hiroo Onoda of the Japanese army made world headlines when he emerged from the Philippine jungle after a thirty-year ordeal.

Hirō "Hiroo" Onoda (小野田 寛郎, Onoda Hirō, 19 March 1922 – 16 January 2014) was an Imperial Japanese Army intelligence officer who fought in World War II and was a Japanese holdout who did not surrender at war's end in August 1945. He held the rank of second lieutenant in the Imperial Japanese Army

from a Philippine jungle convinced that World War II was still being fought. Other books in this series. 10% off. No Surrender: My Thirty Year War. Hiroo Onoda.

Onoda made world headlines when he emerged from a Philippine jungle convinced that World War II was still being fought.

No Surrender My Thirty Year War Hiroo Onoda. 19 people like this topic. Want to like this page?

No Surrender My Thirty Year War Hiroo Onoda.

Hiroo Onada who stayed on the island of Lubang thinking he was supposed to continue guerilla warfare on Allied forces, who only learned that WWII was over in. Hiroo Onoda + No Surrender. Hiroo Onoda, the Japanese who remained hiding for 29 years after the WWII ended, because he didn't know. No Surrender: My Thirty-Year War. Visit. In the Spring of 1974, 2nd Lt. Hiroo Onoda of the Japanese army made world headlines when he emerged from the Philippine jungle after a thirty-year ordeal.


Mustard Forgotten
My hat goes off to Hiroo Onoda for his honesty and for being genuine about his emotions, his experiences, and his thinking. This is the exact reason I enjoyed this book so much. If you read this book with an open mind it gives an excellent lens into his perspective of the war, culture, mind, and day to day survival. It is helpful to understand Zen, Shinto, and Japanese culture at the time to better understand his perspective and reasoning for his actions, but not necessary, if you keep in mind that these were key elements in his thinking. I have read the one star reviews where many wrote or implied that he was stupid, I find this view ignorant and xenophobic. His faith was in his emperor (a living god) and his country, due to his faith in these he made his decisions which he later learned were based on false premises; just as many today have faith in a particular god(s) and/or country which are based on their own perceptions and communication, rhetoric, and experiences which they perceive as being true even though it is just based on their faith or an opinion. If the last few sentences offend you, then this book might not be your cup of tea otherwise this book is an awesome tool to see the war from a different lens of perspective.
LoboThommy
The author was a Japanese soldier in World War II that was abandoned on an island in the Philippines near the end of the war. He was told not to surrender until the rest of the Japanese army came back for him. He and a handful of others held out for years. Gradually, all of his comrades were killed. He survived in the mountains of his populated island by killing nearby livestock, hiding such food and ammunition as he had, stealing supplies from nearby houses, etc. He held out until 1974, despite attempts by his own government and family to retrieve him. Amazingly, he was still engaged in shootouts with police and others decades after the war ended. This book is his own account.

He provides as near a how-to manual for survival in the wilderness as is possible under the circumstances. He also provides an explanation as to how he could believe that the war continued into the 1970's (despite stealing and listening to a radio at certain times). He describes how it was that he finally came to accept the end of the war and the end of his mission in the jungle.

The book is of interest far beyond those who study war and jungle survival. This book is a study in perspective, duty, honor, commitment and even culture. No Surrender comes as close as possible to answering the question of how someone could do something like this. While Americans were enjoying the Super Bowl, color television, the moon landings, the jet age, Japanese imports, etc., the author was still fighting World War II. Exploring his perspective is as interesting as any other part of the story.
Modigas
Very interesting indeed! One thing is clear- that is how thoroughly he was inculcated with wartime Japanese propaganda. He actually believed that the "Greater East Asia Co-Prosperity Sphere" was something real created for the greater benefit of all East Asian peoples lead by a benevolent Japanese government. Also he was so imbued with the wartime ethos that he would not even believe his own brother. There is dedication to duty but despite his obvious intelligence, he never bothered to THINK. The forward or a review said there was nothing of fanaticism in it. I have to consider dedication to duty WITHOUT thinking, fanaticism.
Some things he left out I would have liked to have known were his reactions to new technology such as the first time he saw jet aircraft.
I do have one real gripe and that is no fault of the book's content. I received the book as shown. It was stamped inside "Not for resale- THIS IS A FREE BOOK." and some organization in Baltimore. I only paid $3.50 + shipping but, it's the principle of the thing.
Vozuru
This is basically an awesome novel that happens to be nonfiction. Any history buff or outdoorsman would probably find a lot to appreciate in this text. Most of it isn't really about war, but about being self-reliant and surviving a seemingly impossible situation through wit and perseverance.

Obviously, the efforts of Onoda and his small (and slowly shrinking) group of soldiers was pointless; the war was over and they were fighting and dying for nothing. And it's quite wrenching to see how Onoda reacted to learning this--reflecting on the deaths of his comrades after learning that they died over an incredible misunderstanding. But how they managed to keep at it against incredible odds is very inspiring--possible only because these were some seriously tough dudes with an astonishing degree of self-discipline and excellent jungle survival skills.

It's fascinating and most bizarre to read about the way Onoda's unit reacted to news they got from papers dropped by airplanes and from radios that they stole from villagers. The thought of Japanese defeat being inconceivable, they had constructed this entire alternate history to try to explain what they were seeing and why the "propaganda" lied about some things and not others. They weren't entirely frozen in the 1940s, being aware of numerous technological advances--not least of which were the pilfered transistor radios--and the development of a democratic government in Japan.

It's hard to believe at first that a guerilla soldier could keep fighting a long-concluded war for decades, and still have hundreds of rounds of ammunition and a functional rifle after thirty years, but to read about how and why it happened is a unique and enlightening experience. This is a serious historical document.
Magis
Interesting read but it would have been nice to include his "post surrender" life which was a bit of a story itself. Some of the activity of these men during those 30 years resulted in the deaths of islanders that was not mentioned in the book. Telling the story should include all the details and not avoid the ones that might look bad. Even so, it was worth reading.