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by Charles Bodman Rae
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Arts & Literature
  • Author:
    Charles Bodman Rae
  • ISBN:
    0711969108
  • ISBN13:
    978-0711969100
  • Genre:
  • Publisher:
    Omnibus Press; 3rd edition (December 1, 1999)
  • Pages:
    318 pages
  • Subcategory:
    Arts & Literature
  • Language:
  • FB2 format
    1107 kb
  • ePUB format
    1710 kb
  • DJVU format
    1435 kb
  • Rating:
    4.3
  • Votes:
    165
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Rae knew Lutoslawski personally, and his book makes great use of interviews. There is a great deal of information here on Lutoslawski's personal life that gives context to the works.

That Charles Bodman Rae, composer and pianist, knows more than a thing or two about Lutoslawski and his music is evident from this book. After all, we are told, it comes from the fruits of "hours of recorded conversation with the composer himself

That Charles Bodman Rae, composer and pianist, knows more than a thing or two about Lutoslawski and his music is evident from this book. After all, we are told, it comes from the fruits of "hours of recorded conversation with the composer himself.

The Music of Lutoslawski. Stucky's work is a detail musicological investigation of Lutoslawski's oeuvre, with numerous illustrations taken from the scores, but it can be a useful resource for all fans of the composer's work, even if they have no formal musical training. One will understand the String Quartet much better after seeing a breakdown of its sections here.

ISBN13:9780571164509. Release Date:March 1995.

Professor Charles Bodman Rae is a composer, pianist, conductor and author. This continuing appointment to Australia's senior professorship in music (es. 884) was made in 2001. He has also led the Elder Conservatorium in the managerial and administrative roles of both Dean and Director (2001-2007).

Adrian Thomas of Cardiff University and Charles Bodman Rae, the author of a monograph about the composer, were . Witold Lutoslawski was born in 1913.

Adrian Thomas of Cardiff University and Charles Bodman Rae, the author of a monograph about the composer, were awarded Lutoslawski Society medals at a ceremony at Warsaw's Royal Castle. The ceremony was followed by a recital-on a piano once owned by Lutoslawski-by pianist Jean Pierre Armengaud. All his work written before World War II was destroyed in the Warsaw uprising of 1944; after the war, he wrote symphonies, concertos, chamber music, and vocal pieces, and began to be more widely played after 1956, when the political climate in Poland changed

Charles Bodman Rae observes a long-range relationship between the pitch classes E-flat and F, heard as a major .

Charles Bodman Rae observes a long-range relationship between the pitch classes E-flat and F, heard as a major second at the very beginning of the first movement and as a major ninth at the end of the second movement. He proposes that this latter passage (downbeat 158) functions as a culmination of the entire symphony. A full analysis of this symphony in terms of akcja would trace the development of this and other key ideas (perhaps the first movement's refrain) throughout the work. New York: Oxford University Press, 2001.

Examination of Lutoslawski's life and work draws on wide-ranging and meticulous research including hours of recorded conversation with the composer himself. Third revised edition contains an additional chapter and many more photographs.

I love Mercedes
if you are a student studying composition, then this book is a must. The book is too technical to interest the general music lover.
Bradeya
Charles Bodman Rae's THE MUSIC OF LUTOSLAWSKI appears here in a third edition published by Omnibus Press. The book was first completed shortly before the great Polish composer's death, and the second edition was available only in Polish translation, but here we finally get a full view of Lutoslawski's entire career.

Rae knew Lutoslawski personally, and his book makes great use of interviews. There is a great deal of information here on Lutoslawski's personal life that gives context to the works. We learn about the trials of his family after World War I, his daring escape from capitivity in World War II, his ways of evading Stalinist dangers in the '50s, and his constant travels to conduct his music and pick up honorary degrees later in life. Rae also tells of general historical events in Poland and how they might have affected Lutoslawski's music, such as the Cello Concerto and the Symphony No. 3.

But it's not all biography. There is plenty of discussion of the music, and score examples abound. Lutoslawski's method of basing harmonies on twelve-note chords is explained fairly well, and the discussions of the String Quartet and Symphony No. 2 are useful to understand the structure of these great applications of limited aleatorism. I paid less attention to the coverage of Lutoslawski's late works, since I find music like the Piano Concerto and "Partita" dreadfully banal, but Rae does indeed manage to cover the composer's entire oeuvre, up to the sketches of the never-to-be-completed violin concerto.

My complaints about the work are few. One is that, while the book was generally updated to reflect Lutoslawski's depth, there are still many phrasings that oddly suggest that he is still with us and composing. This is especially true in the notes, but found also in the body of the text as well. Also, Rae doesn't pay much attention at all to Lutoslawski's occasional pieces. One could understand that they lack the inventiveness of the orchestral works and thus don't merit serious analysis, but it would still be helpful to say something about them for the benefit of fans.

Full-length books on Lutoslawski are few, whether in English or in other languages. If you enjoy this one, be sure to also seek out Steven Sucky's LUTOSLAWSKI AND HIS MUSIC (Oxford University Press, 1981), as well as the collection LUTOSLAWSKI STUDIES, ed. Zbigniew Skowron (Oxford University Press, 2001). The former has a more rigorous discussion of harmony than Rae's book, though biographical details aren't so many, while the collection of papers examines all sorts of specialized matters.
Kabei
Charles Bodman Rae has done a magnificent job assmebling and detailing the development of the late great 20th century Polish composer, Witold Lutoslawski. Breaking his compositional output into several periods and musical examples from the pieces of those periods, Rae covers the early folk inspired workds of the 40s and 50s to the radical discovery of aleatorism in 1960 which helped cement his compositional voice. His unique use of controlled aleatorism would be a trademark of all of his works from 1960 through his last work in 1992. Lutoslawski was one of the very few composers who was able to find a harmonic system which was non-tonal and non-2nd Viennese school i.e. twelve-tone system. (the others who had unique harmonic systems were Messiaen and Ligeti). Rae goes through some of the evolution in his harmonic thinking, but I would recommend Steven Stucky's "Lutoslawski and his music" for more detailed harmonic analysis of his work. The Stucky book does not cover all of the works up to Lutoslawski's death, but does get a significant number of the larger ones. Unlike the Stucky book, Rae's book (part of the Faber and Faber music series) also gives the reader biographical insight which isn't too dry. In this respect, the faber series continues to excel giving readers of differing musical knowledge straws to pick at; those not too interested in the themes and workings of particular pieces can focus on the tidbits of historical working behind the pieces.