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by Toi Derricotte
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Arts & Literature
  • Author:
    Toi Derricotte
  • ISBN:
    0393045447
  • ISBN13:
    978-0393045444
  • Genre:
  • Publisher:
    W W Norton & Co Inc; First Edition edition (October 1, 1997)
  • Pages:
    205 pages
  • Subcategory:
    Arts & Literature
  • Language:
  • FB2 format
    1123 kb
  • ePUB format
    1521 kb
  • DJVU format
    1141 kb
  • Rating:
    4.6
  • Votes:
    529
  • Formats:
    doc mobi lrf lrf


The Black Notebooks Derricotte, a light-skinned black woman, focuses intensely and wonderfully on blackness. Toi Derricotte is the author of four collections of poetry. She teaches at the University of Pittsburgh. Paperback: 208 pages.

The Black Notebooks Derricotte, a light-skinned black woman, focuses intensely and wonderfully on blackness. brilliant, devastating. Would I recommend it? Absolutely. To whom? Anyone interested in writing. In human relationship.

Poet Toi Derricotte says, in The Black Notebooks: An Interior Journey, that "one of my. .What's so brave about Derricotte's book is not that it is so "interior" or her astute observations of race in America, but that it is so honest.

Poet Toi Derricotte says, in The Black Notebooks: An Interior Journey, that "one of my biggest strengths as a wrier, perhaps the only really unique thing I can give, is that I am determined to tell the truth" (184). Upon finishing this oddly written but deeply personal memoir/journal, I would say she certainly understands herself as a writer.

Derricotte, Toi, 1941-. Books for People with Print Disabilities. Internet Archive Books. Uploaded by Lotu Tii on October 1, 2012.

In 1996, Norton Publishing Company accepted for publication Derricotte's The Black Notebooks, a book she began in 1974 when her family became one of the first black families to move into Upper Montcair, New Jersey.

In 1996, Norton Publishing Company accepted for publication Derricotte's The Black Notebooks, a book she began in 1974 when her family became one of the first black . The Black Notebooks: An Interior Journey. ISBN 978-0-393-31901-9.

In 1996, Norton Publishing Company accepted for publication Derricotte's The Black Notebooks, a book she began in 1974 when her family became one of the first black families to move into Upper Montclair, New Jersey In Derricotte's poetry, the taboo, the restricted, and the repressed figure prominently; they are often the catalysts that prompt her to write, to confess the painful.

Information about the book, The Black Notebooks: An Interior Journey: the Nonfiction, Paperback, by Toi .

Information about the book, The Black Notebooks: An Interior Journey: the Nonfiction, Paperback, by Toi Derricotte (W. W. Norton & Company, Jun 17, 1999). Book Description: The Black Notebooks is the most profound document I have read on racism in America today. is not just one of the best books on race I have ever read but just simply one of the best books I have ever read.

Derricotte’s first books, including The Empress of the Death House and Natural Birth (1983), focus on gender, fertility, and race

Derricotte’s first books, including The Empress of the Death House and Natural Birth (1983), focus on gender, fertility, and race. Derricotte’s third collection, Captivity (1990), considers the vestiges of slavery in the lives of contemporary African Americans, including the prevalence of familial violence, and the continued abuses of racism within the society. In fact, Derricotte’s prose publication, The Black Notebooks: An Interior Journey (1997), is comprised of selections from journals kept over the course of twenty years.

The Black Notebooks: An Interior Journey by Toi Derricotte. The poet Toi Derricotte is a light-skinned black woman whose book, written in journal form, is a vital treatise on what it's like not just to "pass" as white, but also the complicated dance of "choosing" your own racial identity. In this groundbreaking book published in 1998, Dorothy Roberts shows how stereotypes about black women - particularly the "Welfare Queen" - have had a pernicious and persistent impact on black women's reproductive health, both through regulation and substandard levels of care.

Book Format: Choose an option. It challenges all our preconceived notions of what it means to be black or white, and what it means to be human. Norton & Company.

The black notebooks by Toi Derricotte, Toi Derricote, June 1, 1999, W.

by Toi Derricotte, Toi Derricote. Published June 1, 1999 by W. Race relations, In library, Race awareness, Social conditions, Notebooks, sketchbooks, African American women poets, African Americans, Biography. I'm sure most people don't go around all the time thinking about what race they are. ID Numbers.

Spanning twenty years, from the time the author, a light-skinned black woman, moved into an all-white neighborhood, a journal ponders the meaning of being black in a racially divided country, and the price of denying it.

Yllk
I will borrow these words from the item page for this book: "The Black Notebooks is one of the most extraordinary and courageous accounts of race in this country, seen through the eyes of a light-skinned black woman and a respected American poet. It challenges all our preconceived notions of what it means to be black or white, and what it means to be human." These words seem true to me, but do not bear witness to the immense pain captured in this book. It is originally the multiple pains experienced and captured by the author, but it is also the pain we all share living in this racist (though also astonishing, beautiful, great and unfathomable) society we call America.

I have read this book twice, each time in a concentrated interval of one or two days. Once read it weighs heavily on the mind and soul. The number of words consumed in reading it is not large, but those words form a potent dose of truth, one that I have difficulty handling. I started reading it again today but put it aside as I do not wish to undertake the difficult effort of absorbing that dose of truth on this particular day. I expect to have to read this book again and again to do it justice by eventually having my mind accept the bitterness of the truth it contains. It is fortunate that this book contains great beauty as well, for when I am finally able to accept its bitter truth, I will also have possession of its beauty.
Ndyardin
It is going to take me a while to read this book because it is deep and the author has a highly developed mind and I
don't want to miss anything. At every other sentence I want to write the author and tell her so much about how I agree
with her and to add more to what she has said. Then I remember that I must restrain myself because I believe there is
nothing to be done about our unique & emotion packed situation. Few people even talk about it.

The author is just another unsung heroine. But...there will be another day !
net rider
I joined a reading group at the university and The Black Notebooks is one of the required reads for the discussion. I quickly searched Amazon for this book and found it in hardcover and was excited. I recently attended the group and Toi was our guest speaker--she signed the book for me and now I feel as though I have a treasure to keep. Many thanks for your quick delivery.
GoodBuyMyFriends
Beautiful and moving! Very generous and difficult.
Rageseeker
I got this for a class that I was taking and was not expecting much as it was a documentary. The writer had published everything as if she was writing her day-to-day life in a journal. It was hard to understand at first (being that we're from different times) but this type of writing style was easy to follow and let me see aspects of the author that you usually wouldn't see.
Natety
Excellent viewpoint of the internal struggle racists creates coupled with the impact of external forces, too.
melody of you
The Black Notebooks is likely the most unabashed work I've ever read about the human experience in America. Add to that the issue of race, identity, and desperate desire to 'fit' and 'be' In--only to be denied--and you have a poignantly engrossing treatise on Race, Psychology and Sociology in the US, Mid-To Late 20th Century. Within this book Derricotte exposes her trauma of living as a woman who visually (to whites mostly) appears to be white, and because of it, is relentlessly bombarded with slurs and racist ideology, spoken as plain as day and without apology or consciousness. These routine offerings (endured) by the white people in the author's life are perpetrated because of the belief that she is 'one of them.'

What is grinding in Derricotte's work is that recurring moment of awareness within herself that she is black and that others speaking so shamelessly do not see it. Further, the author must then decide [again and again] to address the slights (by telling them of her ethnicity) or ignore them out of fear of being 'found out' and alienated/ostracized by the society that she chooses to surround herself with. And that is, in the midst of what has to be a schizophrenia-inducing ongoing nightmare, part of the issue--left unadressed--as I see it. Derricotte has been raised in a middle-class/upper-class world where she says all the people she knew loved and touched were black--albeit apparently of lighter flesh tone like she is. That said, her choosing to live exclusively among whites seems like an escape from everyone else--even though her husband is visibly black, though he was raised in an all white environment and never saw himself, his blackness as something of an asset.

It seems to me that Derricotte could have made different choices earlier in her life that would have reduced the bludgeoning of racism she faced on a daily basis by choosing often to hide in the midst of white society. Perhaps her upbringing--for all its exceptional and exclusionary (among other blacks) 'qualities' contributed significantly and maybe unconsciously to her wanting to be buried in the bosom of whiteness.

Many paradoxes exist within this memoir. The psychological dismantling, soul shredding and ultimately soul expanding experiences offered here are without a doubt, memorable, indelible and personal. And in some ways, universal, because the ultimate goal of living is to, in fact, live, and to love, celebrate and rejoice the gift of life itself. For all of the author's courageous, outrageous and intense revelations on race and identity, we are made more whole because of her honest sharing and unique perspective on the subjects of racism and all the other isms that are a byproduct of it.

This book is recommended to anyone wanting to dive headfirst into the murky waters of self-discovery through and ultimately beyond race.