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by John Stubbs
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Arts & Literature
  • Author:
    John Stubbs
  • ISBN:
    0141017171
  • ISBN13:
    978-0141017174
  • Genre:
  • Publisher:
    Viking (September 1, 2007)
  • Pages:
    592 pages
  • Subcategory:
    Arts & Literature
  • Language:
  • FB2 format
    1753 kb
  • ePUB format
    1478 kb
  • DJVU format
    1873 kb
  • Rating:
    4.5
  • Votes:
    277
  • Formats:
    rtf azw lrf lit


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John Donne: The Reformed. Never have I read a biography of such splendid insight, detail and integrity.

Despite his request for a modest burial, Donne is commemorated by an imposing monument in St Paul's. A white marble statue depicts him rising in his graveclothes, presumably on Judgement Day. The image was taken while Donne was still alive, and he had designed it carefully himself. He orchestrated a masterly death. Throughout his many illnesses, his mind never tired: he could read and write from his sickbed. During his last days he felt strong enough to pose for one last portrait, and arranged a resurrection scene.

John Stubbs was born in 1977 and studied English at Oxford and Renaissance Literature at. .Donne: The Reformed Soul was shortlisted for the Costa Biography Award and longlisted for the Guardian First Book Award.

John Stubbs was born in 1977 and studied English at Oxford and Renaissance Literature at Cambridge where he completed a doctorate in 2005. Reprobates was shortlisted for the Samuel Johnson Prize.

John Donne, Ann Donne, Undone went the famous epigram, attributed to Donne himself, after their secret .

John Donne, Ann Donne, Undone went the famous epigram, attributed to Donne himself, after their secret marriage. Ann’s wealthy, titled father raged at the lovers’ deception and economic inequality, while Donne maintained metaphorical precision in begging Sir George More’s forgiveness: Though perchance yow intend not utter destruction, yet the way through which I fall towards yt is so headlong, that being thus push’d, I shall soone be at bottome.

John Stubbs divides the life of the great metaphysical poet and divine John Donne into three parts. In the first he grows up and sows his famous wild oats. In the second he tries with increasing desperation for secular preferment. John Stubbs divides the life of the great metaphysical poet and divine John Donne into three parts.

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Metamorphosing from scholar to buccaneer, from outcast to establishment. Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read.

The Reformed Soul: A Biography or any other file from Books category .

Download John Donne: The Reformed Soul: A Biography or any other file from Books category. From scholar to buccaneer, from outcast to establishment figure, John Donne emerged as one of the greatest English poets. Following Donne from Plague-ridden streets to palaces, from taverns to the pulpit of St Paul's, John Stubbs's "exemplary literary biography" (Harold Bloom) is a vivid portrait of an extraordinary writer and his country at a time of bewildering and cruel transformation.

John Donne - For other people named John Donne, see John Donne (disambiguation). Milton, John - born Dec. 9, 1608, London, Eng. died Nov. 8, 1674, Chalfont St. Giles, Buckinghamshire English poet. A brilliant youth, Milton attended Cambridge University (1625–32), where he wrote poems in Latin, Italian, and English; these included L Allegr. Universalium.

Following Donne from Plague-ridden streets to palaces, from the taverns on the Bankside to the pulpit of St. Paul's, John Stubbs's biography is a vivid portrait of an extraordinary writer and his country at a time of bewildering and cruel transformation.

John Donne-born in 1572, at the outset of the most politically tumultuous and religiously violent era in English .

In the early stages the book is really quite sensual as Stubbs moves through Donne's years as a philanderer, a man who enjoyed the thrill of the chase but who quickly tired of the women he caught and who subsequently moved on to others.

John Stubbs's Donne: the Reformed Soul brings one of Britain's most famous poets - and famous periods in history - to life. John Donne's life story is inextricably tied up with the fabric of a society in the throes of religious persecution. His family had long been subject to the terror inflicted upon Catholics under the reign of Elizabeth I, and while his brother languished in prison, and his mother and uncles fled to exile in Europe, Donne was consumed by the question of his own faith and by trying to figure out what it is that connects human beings - and keeps them apart. In his biography of Donne, John Stubbs chronicles not only a long and bitter sectarian conflict, but also the love story of a young couple who broke the rules of their society, and paid the ultimate price. From the raucous streets of late sixteenth-century London to the personal and political intrigues of Donne's family and public life, from the horrors of the Reformation to the delight of Donne's poetry, John Stubbs' book is a vivid, dazzling biography of an extraordinary man, as well as a compelling portrait of England at a time of bewildering transformation. 'Magnificent . . . remarkable'Daily Telegraph 'Impressive . . . Fluent, assured and on fire with ideas and enthusiasm, excels at providing Donne with a living context'Miranda Seymour, Sunday Times John Stubbs was born in 1977 and studied English at Oxford and Renaissance Literature at Cambridge where he completed a doctorate in 2005. Donne: The Reformed Soul was published in 2006 and won the Glen Dimplex Irish Writers' Centre New Writer of the Year and a Royal Society of Literature Jerwood Award for non-fiction. It was shortlisted for the Costa Biography Award and longlisted for the Guardian First Book Award.

Kelenn
“ On a huge hill,
Cragg’d, and steep, Truth stands, and he that will
Reach her, about must, and about must go,
And what the hills suddenness resists, win so;
Yet strive so, that before age, deaths twilight,
Thy Soul rest, for none can work in that night.”

‘Truth stands on high hill’ and we must reach for her . . .’’ This search for ‘Truth’ seems old fashioned today. Yet, who doesn’t ponder on the need to find her before ‘deaths twilight’?

“His upbringing also endowed him with the intellectual means to consider for himself the great doctrinal issues that preoccupied his age. As a young man, he came to see that every thoughtful individual had an obligation of conscience to conduct a personal search for God. The journey would not follow a straightforward path. It would involve many digressions and backtrackings, but it had to be undertaken nonetheless.’’

No wonder Dr Johnson named him a ‘metaphysical poet”!

“He became one of the great secular and spiritual writers of the late Renaissance, and of world literature.’’

‘His poems, for which most people now remember him, are to be found in the spiky scripts of countless commonplace books dating from his lifetime and after his death, often supplemented with laudatory remarks. As a student, Donne’s laconic, feisty, funny, barbed, demonically clever verse was admired and imitated by close coteries of readers, most of them friends or poetically minded young men. Later on, epigrams, verse letters and tributes by Donne were highly prized by influential figures in the royal Court. The limited but devoted following that collected and sought out his lyrics in manuscript multiplied exponentially after the first publication of his collected poems in 1633. By then it was generally accepted that a major new presence had entered the language. In 1619, the playwright Ben Jonson, the leader of his own tribe of acolytes, had declared Donne to be ‘the first poet in the world, in some things’.’’

‘First poet in the world’!

“Yet Jonson also said that Donne ‘deserved hanging’ for the liberties he took with the rhythmic conventions of the day. Later generations saw Donne as ‘the late Copernicus in Poetrie’, a decisive redrawer of the literary cosmos.”

I 1572–1602
1 The Den
2. Henry
3. Cadiz
4. The Islands
5. Captain Donne
6. The Secretary
7. Lost Words
8. The Rebels
9. The Member
10. The Undoing

II 1603–1616
11. Sunrise
12. The Close Prison at Mitcham
13. Irregularities
14. The Apparition
15. A Valediction to the World

III 1617–1631
16. Stone
17. The Torn Ship
18. Clay
19. The Spouse
20. Devotions
21. The Old Player
22. The Reprimand
23. The Likeness

This quote serves as the epigraph. . .

“Two Religions cannot be suffred in one kingdome:
for diversities cause factions, garboiles and civill warres,
which never end but with the subversion of the commonwealth...”

Sir William Vaughan, The Golden Grove [1608]

And here indicating the style of this work. Seems to serve more as a biography of Elizabethan England more than relating the story of one famous poet. The religious, political, commercial, military, social background cover considerable pages. The man overshadowed, although never ignored.

Serves closer to a school textbook for scholars than for the general reader. Not difficult - but includes more detail, more day-to-day events than I enjoy.

Afterward . . .

“Donne believed that there was more to death than ‘naturall reason’ could make out alone. Faith had to absorb and overwhelm the vision of irrevocable extinction that the world presented to the senses and the mind, and which Donne conveys so harrowingly here. Yet he could not diminish the power and reality of that vision. To one who had performed so many remarkable reformations and comebacks, it was only death that could not be ‘undone’. A death changed all that remained by the vacancy it created. When the Dean of St Paul’s passed away quietly in 1631, nobody was the same; and not because he was John Donne, a name in the literatures both of divinity and natural reason, but because he had lived. He was a man, he had his part in humanity. When a single life ended, Donne reasoned, let alone when countless numbers were reduced to nothing, something in him died as well, and in all those left behind. The bell at his funeral, as at any, tolled for everyone.’’

Extensive notes (700?) linked. Great!

More than one hundred references in bibliography (not linked).

Detailed index (not linked).
Via
Mr. Stubbs has put together a wonderful biographical story of Donne, using many sources, not the least being Donne's poetry, to bring to life a literary genius about whom I had known much to little. I'm still in the midst of reading it, to the point where he now has 5 bairns, a somewhat neglected wife, and virtually no prospects for income despite his many connections at Court. The BBC absolutely must work with Stubbs to present his biography dramatically. I'd watch it, even if I had to choose between it and the NFL playoffs!
Cordanara
A well researched biography of a complex and interesting writer!
MisTereO
The complex life of a former rake, politico, and then dean of St. Paul's Cathedral in London. And, above all, a master of the written word. The author of this biography writes in a lively style that does credit to his subject.

I do not usually think "Afterwords" are justified. In this case, this device provides for a nicely done close, with its linkage between Dr. Donne and our age's great physicist, J. Robert Oppenheimer. (Dr. Donne's words still speak to our largely unchanged human condition.)

By a young scholar, John Stubbs. This is an excellent first book.
Ielonere
I have long had a bit of a fascination with John Donne. A poet and eventual clergyman who lived from 1572-1631, Donne's poems are among my favorites. His Holy Sonnets have given me much cause to think and his early works, so often sexual and vulgar, have shown a man who underwent a clear and profound transformation in his life. From writing poetry which described forbidden and clandestine affairs that involved bribing servants, hushing siblings, and sneaking past parents in order to consummate love, Donne progressed to poetry celebrating Christ and his triumph over death.

Death, be not proud, though some have called thee

Mighty and dreadful, for thou art not so;

For those, whom thou think'st thou dost overthrow,

Die not, poor Death, nor yet canst thou kill me.

...

One short sleep past, we wake eternally,

And Death shall be no more; Death, thou shalt die.

Donne was born into an English Roman Catholic family at a time when belonging to the Roman church could and often did carry grave consequences. Though his father died while Donne was only a young boy, he still received a good education and soon learned of his ability to mold language. He also learned of his ability as a lawyer and a statesman and soon converted to the Anglican Church in order to enhance his career prospects. Proudly profligate, Donne spent his youth and early adulthood attempting to satisfy every lust of his flesh. Yet in an age where marriages were strictly arranged by fathers to further their own ends, Donne secretly married for love and was to suffer the consequences of such an uncouth arrangement for the rest of his life. After trying unsuccessfully to rise through the ranks in government service, he eventually became a priest and spent much of his career as Dean of St Paul's Cathedral in London. Though a number of his sermons and works of prose has survived, Donne is known today as being one of the greatest English poets. He is remembered in common phrases he coined such as "no man is an island," and "know for whom the bell tolls; it tolls for thee."

John Donne: The Reformed Soul is a new account of Donne's life by John Stubbs, a young scholar from England. It relies equally upon previous biographies and the record of Donne's life as it is found in his prose and poetry. In a biography of a poet, we depend a great deal on the ability of the author to interpret the poetry. If he misinterprets the man's writing, he misinterprets his life, and especially so when so much of Donne's poetry, and his early poetry in particular, was autobiographical. On the whole, though I am largely unqualified to make such judgments, I felt that Stubbs was accurate in his interpretations and presented Donne as he appears in his works. Where I had a little bit less confidence was in the author's understanding of Donne's theology. Donne lived in a time of great political and ecclesiastical complexity, a time when religion and politics were hopelessly intertwined. Thus it can be difficult to separate what Donne truly believed from his studies of Scripture and what he almost had to believe in order to maintain his position. And, of course, in a book of this sort we get only a small glimpse into Donne's theology through his surviving sermons. The sermons and poetry combine to provide a glimpse into an odd, uneven faith that seemed to yearn for much of the Catholicism Donne had left behind and also yearned for God to be someone other than who He reveals Himself to be. Whether Donne truly knew and loved the God of the Bible is difficult to know and certainly not ours to judge. Reading his works, though, presents enough confusion and slightly unorthodox theology that it becomes quickly apparent why Donne is known as a poet and not as a great Christian or theologian.

This biography is a long read and certainly not always an easy one. It turns often (and obviously) to seventeenth century language and this can take time and effort to unravel. Yet the book is clearly well-written and is a rewarding read, even if it can be complex. In the early stages the book is really quite sensual as Stubbs moves through Donne's years as a philanderer, a man who enjoyed the thrill of the chase but who quickly tired of the women he caught and who subsequently moved on to others. He occasionally employs harsh language in giving the sense of the words Donne and other poets used in their poetry. The latter portions aptly describe Donne's life in the context of the fascinating period in which he lived out the last years of his life.

John Donne: The Reformed Soul is not the kind of biography that would likely be written by a Christian or published by a Christian publisher, even if does deal with a Christian figure. Yet it is an interesting biography and a good one that has been well-reviewed by many notable publications. It is well worth reading for anyone who has an interest in the great poet John Donne.
Tetaian
Reading John Stubb's biography of John Donne is pure joy. Stubbs vividly portrays the times and circumstances of Donne's life with vigour and wisdom, all the while staying true to the available facts and to the psychological complexity of his fascinating subject. Never have I read a biography of such splendid insight, detail and integrity.