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by Morris Wyszogrod
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Arts & Literature
  • Author:
    Morris Wyszogrod
  • ISBN:
    0791443132
  • ISBN13:
    978-0791443132
  • Genre:
  • Publisher:
    SUNY Press; 1st edition (August 1999)
  • Pages:
    266 pages
  • Subcategory:
    Arts & Literature
  • Language:
  • FB2 format
    1329 kb
  • ePUB format
    1442 kb
  • DJVU format
    1561 kb
  • Rating:
    4.3
  • Votes:
    917
  • Formats:
    lit docx mbr doc


In this memoir Morris Wyszogrod recounts his experiences from the time of the Nazi invasion of Poland to the liberation of the Theresienstadt concentration camp in 1945.

In this memoir Morris Wyszogrod recounts his experiences from the time of the Nazi invasion of Poland to the liberation of the Theresienstadt concentration camp in 1945. digging up mass graves and burning the bodies to eliminate the evidence of Nazi war crimes; his witnessing of the firebombing of Dresden in February 1945; and his subsequent liberation at Theresienstadt by the Red Army in May 1945. Just as an artist may register what she or he sees against a sensitive visual and moral template, so Wyszogrod doubly registered what he saw and felt, both in his drawings and in his memories.

A Brush With Death is the story of Morris Wyszogrod and his Holocaust experience in Poland. Eventually, Morris lost most of his family in the many roundups of Jews in the ghetto. In May 1943, he was sent to the camp at Budzyn, Plaszow, and a few other camps

A Brush With Death is the story of Morris Wyszogrod and his Holocaust experience in Poland. Morris and his family were from Warsaw, living in what would eventually become the Warsaw Ghetto during the war. Morris was always interested in art, one of his ambitions was to go to the Marshal Jozef Pilsudski School of Graphics in Warsaw. In May 1943, he was sent to the camp at Budzyn, Plaszow, and a few other camps. He was liberated by the Russians at Theresienstadt in May 1945. I thought this was a great book, to me the author came across as very sincere.

A Brush with Death book. Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read. Start by marking A Brush with Death: An Artist in the Death Camps as Want to Read: Want to Read saving. In this memoir Morris Wyszogrod recounts his experiences from the time. Start by marking A Brush with Death: An Artist in the Death Camps as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read.

State University of New York Press. Assembled Product Dimensions (L x W x H). 8 x . 0 x . 7 Inches.

A Brush With Death An Artist in the Death Camps Suny Series in Modern Jewish Literature and Culture.

Author: Morris Wyszogrod. Report "A brush with death: an artist in the death camps".

Recounts the author’s experiences during the Holocaust, from the time of the Nazi invasion of Poland to the liberation of the Theresienstadt concentration camp by the Red Army in 1945.

Roru
A Brush With Death is the story of Morris Wyszogrod and his Holocaust experience in Poland. Morris and his family were from Warsaw, living in what would eventually become the Warsaw Ghetto during the war. Morris was always interested in art, one of his ambitions was to go to the Marshal Jozef Pilsudski School of Graphics in Warsaw. He was accepted into the school, graduating in 1939. After Poland was conquered by the Germans, Morris and his family tried to carve out an existence in the ghetto. Morris worked at slave labor in what was called the horse and wagon unit under the Germans, along with many other skilled laborers. He was able to work with his art under a German who was at least halfways decent to Morris. Eventually, Morris lost most of his family in the many roundups of Jews in the ghetto. In May 1943, he was sent to the camp at Budzyn, Plaszow, and a few other camps. He was liberated by the Russians at Theresienstadt in May 1945. I thought this was a great book, to me the author came across as very sincere. In some ways Morris was lucky enough to be able to work with his art at different times and places. On the other hand, with that type of job Morris tended to be around more Germans which was always dangerous. I also must admit, I skipped around a bit in reading the graphic violence. This is the only book I have ever read that was written by a survivor who was an artist. A great read, and definitely worth five stars to me.
Coiron
An extraordinary ,autobiographic history of the horrors visited upon a person of exceptional talent and
fortitude who lost all, home and family to the Nazi regime..as one who knew Morris well after the end of WW2 in New York City,he was still the exceptional person that survived such horror and loss..this book should be read because it shows how the human being can live through such loss,sorrow and such deprivation and survive and still remain an example for others!
Lightbinder
Morty was a fellow student of my father, the writer, Edward Wallant, who he mentions in the book as being a supportive friend at Pratt. My Father was so moved by all the stories Morty shared, he wrote his own fictionalized reaction to the camps and survival in The Pawnbroker.

This book goes beyond the harrowing events of the camps to the idea that his art saved him then and helped him to survive there and after the war. Morty was always an artist. His friends at Pratt encouraged him to set it all down and finally he has.
Winawel
An extremely interesting book about survival during the holocaust.
Anarus
Excellent excellent book of a young man experiences surviving Nazi concentration camps.
Darkshaper
I was completely engulfed in this story of one man who endured the Nazi annihilation of human beings. I am so glad to have read this survivor's record. Intimate.
Mightdragon
This book contains the very real story of an artist's heartache and survival as a Jewish believer through WWII. I was amazed to read how various engagements involving the author's creativity kept him (and several of those around him) alive throughout the war. It is written with so much detail that the second-hand trauma of this book is hauntingly real.

I am certain this story is honest and told exactly as the writer experienced it. In that way I feel bad for giving it 4 stars; I love and cherish honest stories. What more could I ask for? I am grateful for the book in that I hope people read it and are horrified to the point genocide will not be forgotten or repeated. I will eventually encourage my own children and grandchildren to read the book by keeping it in my library.

So why did I give this book only four stars? Probably because I recently read Viktor Frankl's book Man's Search for Meaning, which appeals more to the therapist in me and left me quite certain I could find beauty and growth in even the darkest places. a Brush with Death leaves me sad. Perhaps I just wish there were more to this book...the story of life after all the trauma. Did Wyszogrod heal? How/What healed him? Did he go on to find meaning in why he survived while others did not? Is he still alive? How/why did he come to write the book? How does he think we could prevent these things,etc. Perhaps my sadness is because I do not know much of what occured for Wyszogrod after the war (I know quite a bit about Frankl). I am glad this book was written...and I hope the rest of life was good to Wyszogrod.