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by Nancy R. Hugo,Robert Llewellyn
Download Seeing Trees: Discover the Extraordinary Secrets of Everyday Trees (Seeing Series) fb2
Photography & Video
  • Author:
    Nancy R. Hugo,Robert Llewellyn
  • ISBN:
    1604692197
  • ISBN13:
    978-1604692198
  • Genre:
  • Publisher:
    Timber Press (August 16, 2011)
  • Pages:
    245 pages
  • Subcategory:
    Photography & Video
  • Language:
  • FB2 format
    1553 kb
  • ePUB format
    1671 kb
  • DJVU format
    1931 kb
  • Rating:
    4.7
  • Votes:
    429
  • Formats:
    rtf txt doc mobi


In Seeing Trees author Nancy Ross Hugo addresses that issue with an in depth look at the biology and anatomy . The photographs are gorgeous, and Nancy Hugo's love-filled descriptions about the extraordinary qualities of trees are powerfully engaging

In Seeing Trees author Nancy Ross Hugo addresses that issue with an in depth look at the biology and anatomy of trees, all kinds of trees. Drawing parallels with bird watching, Hugo shows us how get started in a "tree watching" hobby. Like all complex life forms trees are made up of multiple body parts. Leaves, branches and trunk-bark are the first things we notice. The photographs are gorgeous, and Nancy Hugo's love-filled descriptions about the extraordinary qualities of trees are powerfully engaging. I originally purchased this book off a store end cap as a gift for my mother. The day I started reading it, I treasured it so much, I bought another copy for my mother.

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Similar books to Seeing Trees: Discover the Extraordinary Secrets of Everyday Trees (Seeing Series). How to Be a Good Creature: A Memoir in Thirteen Animals" by Sy Montgomery This is a beautiful book - essential reading for anyone who loves animals and knows how much they can teach us about being human. Sure, most of us know the difference between a pine tree and, say, an oak tree. But usually that's as far as it goes. In Seeing Trees author Nancy Ross Hugo addresses that issue with an in depth look at the biology and anatomy of trees, all kinds of trees.

Seeing Trees by Nancy Hugh and photography by Robert Llewellyn. fits into two genres. And photography is the second genre into which the book fits nicely. The photographs are gorgeous. Most of the book is there. The Seeing Trees by Nancy Hugh and photography by Robert Llewellyn.

Seeing Trees celebrates seldom seen but easily observable tree traits and invites you to watch trees with the same . Robert Llewellyn’s photographs have been featured in major art exhibits, and more than thirty books currently in print

Seeing Trees celebrates seldom seen but easily observable tree traits and invites you to watch trees with the same care and sensitivity that birdwatchers watch birds. Many people, for example, are surprised to learn that oaks and maples have flowers, much less flowers that are astonishingly beautiful when viewed up close. Robert Llewellyn’s photographs have been featured in major art exhibits, and more than thirty books currently in print.Nancy Hugo's love for trees was woven throughout her prose and her own spirit seemed embedded in her words

Similar books to Seeing Trees: Discover the Extraordinary Secrets of Everyday Trees (Seeing Series). See all Product description. Nancy Hugo's love for trees was woven throughout her prose and her own spirit seemed embedded in her words. She is someone I would like to know.

By: Nancy Ross Hugo and Robert Llewellyn. 244 pages, 175 colour photographs. Nancy Ross Hugo is a garden columnist for many publications who has been combining her love of the outdoors with her love of the written word for more than thirty years. Publisher: Timber Press. She is the author of Earth Works: Readings for Backyard Gardeners and Remarkable Trees of Virginia, with Jeff Kirwan. Robert Llewellyn has been photographing trees and landscapes more than forty years. His photographs have been featured in major art exhibits, and more than thirty books featuring his photography are in print.

She is someone I would like to know

Similar books to Seeing Trees: Discover the Extraordinary Secrets of Everyday Trees (Seeing Series). Kindle Paperwhite The best device for reading, full stop. At any rate, even though the trees chosen were from the east and I live in the Pacific Northwest, I could apply the knowledge and am now so much more attuned to the trees here.

item 6 Seeing Trees : Discover the Extraordinary Secrets of Everyday Trees, Hardcove. Trees Hardback Non-Fiction Books. Hardback Robert E. Howard Books.

Seeing Trees: Discover the Extraordinary Secrets of Everyday Trees (2011). The Living Forest: A Visual Journey Into the Heart of the Woods (2017). Robert Llewellyn (born December 29, 1945) is an American photographer whose images have served as the basis for numerous books and exhibits. He studied engineering science at the University of Virginia, and photography with Imogen Cunningham in the 1960s. He married Barbara Reading Grant in 1981 and they live together in Earlysville, Virginia.

Published on Mar 9, 2016 . Seeing trees discover the extraordinary secrets of everyday trees. Published in: Science. Focusing on 10 common trees of North America, Nancy Ross Hugo highlights the rewards of tree viewing and describes some of the most visually interesting leaves, flowers, fruits, buds, leaf scars, twigs, and bark of familiar trees. Using software developed for work with microscopes, Robert Llewellyn created incredibly sharp close-up photographs of the tree detail by stitching together 8 to 45 images of each subject-each shot at a different focal point.

Have you ever looked at a tree? That may sound like a silly question, but there is so much more to notice about a tree than first meets the eye. Seeing Trees celebrates seldom seen but easily observable tree traits and invites you to watch trees with the same care and sensitivity that birdwatchers watch birds. Many people, for example, are surprised to learn that oaks and maples have flowers, much less flowers that are astonishingly beautiful when viewed up close. Focusing on widely grown trees, this captivating book describes the rewards of careful and regular tree viewing, outlines strategies for improving your observations, and describes some of the most visually interesting tree structures, including leaves, flowers, buds, leaf scars, twigs, and bark. In-depth profiles of ten familiar species—including such beloved trees as white oak, southern magnolia, white pine, and tulip poplar—show you how to recognize and understand many of their most compelling (but usually overlooked) physical features.


Nuliax
I am an artist and was looking for close up photography of ginkgo leaves, wanting to draw them realistically.Well, I got accurate ginkgo leaves and more.The photography is just delightful, incredible closeups of a variety of common trees.The beauty of leaves, seeds, bark, etc is artistically inspiring on many levels, across many disciplines. And I thought that i was not interested in info about the trees but the text is informative, presented so even i could understand it, and chatty enough not to bore. I am reading through all of it surprisingly. Well worth the money, this book. Oh, my complaint is that there are not enough trees represented- I want MORE! Great job, Nancy R. Hugo ! Thank you!
Qusserel
Whether you live in a big city or in a more rural setting, trees are all around you. They may be in city parks, school playgrounds, government buildings or urban green-belts. In some locations, away from the cities, trees make up dense forest that can stretch for hundreds of miles, line natural waterways or lakes, stand as lone sentinels in rocky and eroded landscapes. If your like me, you appreciate trees but have only the most basic ability to tell them apart. Sure, most of us know the difference between a pine tree and, say, an oak tree. But usually that's as far as it goes. In Seeing Trees author Nancy Ross Hugo addresses that issue with an in depth look at the biology and anatomy of trees, all kinds of trees. Drawing parallels with bird watching, Hugo shows us how get started in a "tree watching" hobby. Like all complex life forms trees are made up of multiple body parts. Leaves, branches and trunk-bark are the first things we notice. But those are just the surface parts, what we need is a closer look. To that end, Hugo gives the reader a guided tour of tree anatomy. The book opens with a section on "tree viewing": when and where to look, getting a good field guide and techniques to use for the best results. Up next a closer look at various tree parts like; leaves, flowers, fruit and bark. Flower and leaf buds are studied as are twigs, seeds and pollen. The last section puts the spotlight on 9 of our native North American trees and 1 exotic. Get to know: Black Walnut, Red Maple, White Oak and American Beech among others. Two tree species deserve extra attention, the Ginkgo and the Osage Orange. The Ginkgo is an exotic species that was introduced to North America from China some 200 years ago and has established itself in any well watered, drained environment.
Considered by many to be a "living fossil", the Ginkgo has been around for over 250 million years but today is represented by only one species living in China. The Osage Orange is another ancient species, this one native to North America. It's over sized fruit required over sized herbivores to spread its seeds. Ice Age mega fauna like Mammoths, Mastodons, Ground Sloth and Camels may have feasted on its juicy, bitter, fruit. Hugo's writing is conversational, like setting down with a friendly Botanist over afternoon tea. Anyone interested in nature writing in general or trees in particular should find Seeing Trees to be an enjoyable read. Hugo's approach is, for the most part, non-technical but some of the descriptive parts can be a little daunting. Yet, even when she's getting technical the text is easy to follow and I came away with a better understanding of trees and a real desire to try "tree watching" as a recreational hobby. Now, if I can just find a good field guide and a group of interested nature lovers, who knows where this will lead me. Along with Hugo's interesting text are Robert Liewellyn's beautiful photo's that decorate the narrative with many incredible images, ranging from full trees to micro's of buds, flower and other tree parts. The use of the white background is effective on some shots but on others it was distracting and even a little annoying ( ie: pale yellow-green or white flowers against a white background is not the best way to highlight your subject. In some frames a dark or black, or even a natural background, would have been preferable). That being said, this is still a wonderful nature book and one that I will be referring back to, now and then. I had no technical or formatting problems with this Kindle edition.

LastRanger
Bele
I loved this book! Not only did I learn a lot about the nuances of trees, but I loved the writing. Nancy Hugo's love for trees was woven throughout her prose and her own spirit seemed embedded in her words. She is someone I would like to know. At any rate, even though the trees chosen were from the east and I live in the Pacific Northwest, I could apply the knowledge and am now so much more attuned to the trees here. I also have a transplanted Magnolia that for some reason thrives among conifers and Hugo's chapter on this beloved tree was very enlightening.
Marilace
this wise, beautiful book presents, in intimate photos and insightful prose, ten species of trees native to Virginia and neighboring states: American beech, American sycamore, black walnut, Eastern red cedar, gingko, red maple, Southern magnolia, tulip poplar, white oak, white pine. the author and photographer invite us to see, as we have never seen in such detail before, these trees as they reach downward upward inward outward over time -- days, seasons, years....
do not mistake this for a coffee-table book; this is a wise wonder.
Dranar
This is a beautiful, heart opening book. I treasured reading it. I actually limited myself to one chapter a night to extend my reading experience over a longer time. I've never done that before. The photographs are gorgeous, and Nancy Hugo's love-filled descriptions about the extraordinary qualities of trees are powerfully engaging. I originally purchased this book off a store end cap as a gift for my mother. The day I started reading it, I treasured it so much, I bought another copy for my mother. I wasn't willing to give my book away.
Feri
Simply stated, this book is fantastic. I love trees, can identify most, cultivate many, paint and draw them, collect their berries and nuts... but this book showed me so much that I was missing. I was reading the book in the hammock under the maples and only put it down to go over to inspect the 'bud scars' and 'bundle scar' patterns on my black walnut. As a nature lover I thought I 'was' seeing the trees, but this book has opened my eyes to so much more. Peaceful and wonderful.
Kanrad
I loved the author's constant and infectious sense of wonder. I would recommend it to anyone who enjoys learning and who loves being outdoors. I chose this rating because this book channeled my natural desire to learn in a more focused and productive direction.
Amazing book with fabulous photos and thoughtful text, accessible to the layman. This book will make you or your child want to get outside, observe, and marvel at the beauty of Nature. The glory of the little things we so easily miss is clearly displayed in the fantastic close-up photos.