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by William D. Speck
Download Toledo: A History in Architecture 1835-1890 (Images of America) fb2
Photography & Video
  • Author:
    William D. Speck
  • ISBN:
    0738519413
  • ISBN13:
    978-0738519418
  • Genre:
  • Publisher:
    Arcadia Publishing; 1st edition (December 10, 2001)
  • Pages:
    159 pages
  • Subcategory:
    Photography & Video
  • Language:
  • FB2 format
    1868 kb
  • ePUB format
    1808 kb
  • DJVU format
    1471 kb
  • Rating:
    4.5
  • Votes:
    355
  • Formats:
    lit azw txt lrf


Toledo: A History in Architecture 1914 to Century's End (OH) (Images of America) by William Speck Paperback . Author William Speck attended Miami University and received his Masters degree from Columbia University in Preservation Architecture.

Only 7 left in stock (more on the way). He has been collecting photographs of Old Toledo for over 20 years.

Start by marking Toledo: A History in Architecture 1835-1890 (Images of America: Ohio) as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read.

William D. Speck (2002). Toledo: A History in Architecture, 1890-1914 - Images of America". Retrieved 2013-01-22. php?title Toledo Medical College&oldid 862304198". Categories: Educational institutions disestablished in 1914.

In 1850, Toledo had only 3,800 residents, but the introduction of canals and railroads quadrupled the population. Designated as the new county seat, major public buildings and hotels were built. All of these, as well as David Stine and Edward Fallis, infused Toledo's pride into local landmarks of the past and present, including the Boody House, the Wheeler Opera House, the mansions of Collingwood Avenue, and the churches and breweries that complete Toledo's neighborhoods and downtown. a b "Refurbished King bridge will be a mirror of itself Engineer says". p. 13. Retrieved 2012-05-22.

3. Description this book The last place most 19th-century settlers wanted to move was the swampy, fever- ridden Toledo area. 1835-1890 (Images of America) (William D. Speck ) PDF Free Free Read Read Toledo: A History in Architecture 1835-1890 (Images of America) (William D. Speck ) PDF Free E-Reader Download Read Toledo: A History in Architecture 1835-1890 (Images of America) (William D. Speck ) PDF Free in English.

The last place most 19th-century settlers wanted to move was the swampy, fever-ridden Toledo area. However, with the assistance of Irish and German immigrants, among others, Toledo was transformed from a village into a thriving city within 50 years. Captured here is the growth and expansion of the area through the indelible contributions of Toledo's architects. In 1850, Toledo had only 3,800 residents, but the introduction of canals and railroads quadrupled the population. Designated as the new county seat, major public buildings and hotels were built. Isaiah Rogers, one of the most famous architects in the nation, designed the Oliver House Hotel; Toledo's first architect, Frank Scott, planned many notable landscapes in the city as well as some of the most interesting houses; and designing almost every major commercial building in the city was Charles Crosby Miller. All of these, as well as David Stine and Edward Fallis, infused Toledo's pride into local landmarks of the past and present, including the Boody House, the Wheeler Opera House, the mansions of Collingwood Avenue, and the churches and breweries that complete Toledo's neighborhoods and downtown.

Hanad
Good pictures that anyone from Toledo would recognize. Always enjoy seeing pictures from the past of buildings that are still around. A comprehensive portrait of a mid-sized midwestern city as it has evolved over the years. Text is serviceable, but it's the pictures that carry the narrative.

Have lived in or visited Toledo from 1947 to 2005. It is a reminder of how cities rise and fall - it was once the "Glass Capitol of the World" - but as corporations flowed and ebbed, so went Toledo. But there are still glimpses of the past - Toledo Art Museum was one of the first institutions to build a Frank Gehry building - a bold move and an interesting contrast to a classical building. Say what you will, it serves as a reminder that every city has an interesting past. Bit annoyed that it is in three slim volumes - seems it could easily have been one larger book.
Shezokha
...this is what they'd say. At least if interpreted by someone with a consumate knowledge of Toledo history, like the author. Beginning with the city's origins as a transportation nexus in the canal and railroad eras, continuing through its emergence as a manufacturing hub at the dawn of the automobile age, and ending with the Postwar struggle against economic decline, this three-book series lets pictures tell the story. Each volume has hundreds of photos with captions that concisely describe this vanished world with fascinating anecdotes and occasional dry wit.
Diredefender
Wonderful photos and descriptions!
Brakree
Wish it was in hardback
Helo
The "Images of America" series vary quite a lot in quality, and this is one of the good ones. At one time, Toledo was pretty representative of 2nd ranking cities in America, in architecture as in other ways. As anyone who lives there or has had the misfortune to visit it knows, it is now one of the grungiest cities in America, the geographic incarnation of obese, emphysemic, morose, ignorant America. Check out the downtown these days, and you'll see something reminiscent of Newark New Jersey at its nadir. Buildings crumbling, gang graffiti on the walls, junk in the streets, shabby library, the works. Good art museum, though, for some reason.

Check out this collection of postcards, you'll see that even a dump like Toledo once had a money grubbing middle class and a few hot shots that felt the need to thump their chest architecturally, and saw fit to do it in public rather than in a private dwelling, which seems to be the norm these days.

"Tempora mutantur, et Toledo mutantur in illis" [sed non renascit sicut Cleveland].
Conjukus
This is one of the finer Images of America selections. Well written from an arcitectural and historical perspective. Lots & lots of great photos. Wish there were similar architecture guide-oriented Images of America books for other cities too.