» » Phantom Variations: The Adaptations of Gaston Leroux's Phantom of the Opera, 1925 to the Present

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by Ann C. Hall
Download Phantom Variations: The Adaptations of Gaston Leroux's Phantom of the Opera, 1925 to the Present fb2
Performing Arts
  • Author:
    Ann C. Hall
  • ISBN:
    0786442654
  • ISBN13:
    978-0786442652
  • Genre:
  • Publisher:
    McFarland (June 13, 2009)
  • Pages:
    199 pages
  • Subcategory:
    Performing Arts
  • Language:
  • FB2 format
    1571 kb
  • ePUB format
    1872 kb
  • DJVU format
    1428 kb
  • Rating:
    4.6
  • Votes:
    455
  • Formats:
    lit mobi docx lrf


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After discussing Gaston Leroux's original 1910 story, the work turns first to Phantom on film from Lon Chaney's 1925 Phantom through Dario Argento's 1998 film. Stage versions of Phantom are covered in detail, including Webber's spectacular 1986 production and its lesser-known predecessors and competitors, and those that followed

This book examines the themes and variations of Phantom of the Opera, exploring the story's appeal to multiple generations through numerous incarnations.

This book examines the themes and variations of Phantom of the Opera, exploring the story's appeal to multiple generations through numerous incarnations. After discussing Gaston Leroux's original 1910 novel, the work turns first to Phantom on film from Lon Chaney's 1925 Phantom through Dario Argento's 1998 film. Stage versions of Phantom are then covered in detail, including Webber's spectacular 1986 production and its lesser-known predecessors and competitors, and those that followed

The Phantom of the Opera (French: Le Fantôme de l'Opéra), is a novel by French writer Gaston Leroux. It was first published as a serialization in Le Gaulois from 23 September 1909, to 8 January 1910.

The Phantom of the Opera (French: Le Fantôme de l'Opéra), is a novel by French writer Gaston Leroux. It was published in volume form in late March 1910 by Pierre Lafitte and directed by Aluel Malinao.

Phantom Variations This page intentionally left blank Phantom Variations The Adaptations of Gaston Leroux’s . Later, Steve Watt reintroduced me to the Phantom through Arthur Kopit’s musical version, and this book came out of a paper that I wrote on that version.

Phantom Variations This page intentionally left blank Phantom Variations The Adaptations of Gaston Leroux’s Phantom. I would also like to thank Ohio Dominican University for the sabbatical leave to begin my work on this book many years ago. Also, to Katherine Burkman, who read a number of drafts and versions of this piece, my greatest thanks.

Adaptations of The Phantom of the Opera. There have been many literary and dramatic works based on Gaston Leroux's novel The Phantom of the Opera, ranging from stage musicals to films to children's books

In the prolog, Gaston Leroux, the author of the book, introduces the story and his reason for writing i. The prolog ends with Leroux thanking the people who helped him discover information about the opera ghost.

In the prolog, Gaston Leroux, the author of the book, introduces the story and his reason for writing it. He has heard a story about a ghost at an opera house in Paris, France from a person that he refers to as The Persian, and is intent on proving it’s existence. The legend of the ghost says that it is responsible for many different crimes over the years, including the disappearance of the Vicomte de Chagny, the death of the Vicomte’s brother, Count Philippe and the kidnapping of a beautiful young singer named Christine Daae.

This book examines the themes and variations of Phantom of the Opera, exploring the story's appeal to multiple generations through numerous incarnations. After discussing Gaston Leroux's original 1910 novel, the work turns first to Phantom on film from Lon Chaney's 1925 Phantom through Dario Argento's 1998 film. Stage versions of Phantom are then covered in detail, including Webber's spectacular 1986 production and its lesser-known predecessors and competitors, and those that followed. A final section looks at novels and miscellaneous adaptations ranging from erotic fiction to a Donald Barthelme short story.

Halloween
From the novel to the film's and then beyond, Ms Hall literally peels away the literary mask of the Phantom. By both summarizing and exploring the story through various genres she not only lists the versions, but sheds new light on each one. If only this could be updated to include the latest Phantom musical.
Risinal
Fascinating!
GoodLike
I've been studying the adaptations of The Phantom of the Opera (the novel) - the translation to movies. So this book helped me alot, since my focus is on the 1925 and on the 2004 films, but every now and then I have to wander through other adaptations to see how Erik was translated, the moment, etc. This book provides excelent support for both lovers and students of translation.
skriper
This book purports to be a scholarly work, but, as the previous reviewer has noted, it's utterly riddled with errors. The author has apparently not bothered to read some of the books, films and plays she discusses more than once-if at all- and the result is some giant howlers that undermine any crediblity the book might have had. The author finishes by giving a glowing review to 'Phantom of Manhattan', a book so dreadful it ought to have won some kind of prize for ineptitude.
Large swathes of the book are just given over to reciting plot (oh dear- better have the plot right if you're going to do this), the rest to a faux-intellectualism that doesn't convince at all.
If you're reading this because you wanted to know more about this subject and wondered if this book was the answer- save yourself the money and just grab a random person leaving the stage production of Phantom. A random person who has actually watched it properly would be able to tell you more than Ms Hall.