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by Mitchell,Ri Harwell
Download Gone With the Wind Letters fb2
Performing Arts
  • Author:
    Mitchell,Ri Harwell
  • ISBN:
    0283995076
  • ISBN13:
    978-0283995071
  • Genre:
  • Publisher:
    Sidgwich Jackson Ltd (August 27, 1987)
  • Pages:
    480 pages
  • Subcategory:
    Performing Arts
  • Language:
  • FB2 format
    1191 kb
  • ePUB format
    1782 kb
  • DJVU format
    1935 kb
  • Rating:
    4.8
  • Votes:
    377
  • Formats:
    mobi mbr azw docx


Home Margaret Mitchell Gone With the Wind. Miss Pitty told us they hadn't intended announcing it till next year, because Miss Melly hasn't been very well; but with all the war talk going around, everybody in both families thought it would be better to get married soon

Home Margaret Mitchell Gone With the Wind. Gone with the wind, . Miss Pitty told us they hadn't intended announcing it till next year, because Miss Melly hasn't been very well; but with all the war talk going around, everybody in both families thought it would be better to get married soon. So it's to be announced tomorrow night at the supper intermission. Now, Scarlett, we've told you the secret, so you've got to promise to eat supper with u.

It is surprisingly unnecessary to have read (or reread) GWTW before reading this collection of letters that deals almost strictly with the book.

One person found this helpful. It is surprisingly unnecessary to have read (or reread) GWTW before reading this collection of letters that deals almost strictly with the book. Miss Mitchell did an excellent job of keeping her life private in her letters for fear that these letters would be published. She made it very clear that she wanted to keep her life private and never wanted to see her letters published.

Margaret Mitchell Gone with the Wind Margaret Mitchell Gone With the Wind To . Part One Chapter I Scarlett O’Hara was not beautiful, but men seldom realized it when caught by her charm as the Tarleton twins were. In her face were too sharply blended the delicate features of her mother, a Coast aristocrat of French descent, and the heavy ones of her florid Irish father. But it was an arresting face, pointed of.

These letters are fascinating and reveal a humorous, insightful personality of the author of Gone with the Wind. First of all, as far as I'm concerned there is no way to read this book straight from the beginning to the end.

This book expand your understanding of Gone with the Wind. by Margaret Mitchell and Richard Barksdale Harwell. Read through letters about the story and people.

Gone with the Wind is a novel by American writer Margaret Mitchell, first published in 1936. The story is set in Clayton County and Atlanta, both in Georgia, during the American Civil War and Reconstruction Era. It depicts the struggles of young Scarlett O'Hara, the spoiled daughter of a well-to-do plantation owner, who must use every means at her disposal to claw her way out of poverty following Sherman's destructive "March to the Sea".

Mitchell is the author of the best selling novel of all time, "Gone with the Wind" (1936). In 1939, the film version was a smash hit and it received ten Academy Awards. Other early titles of the book were "Tote the Weary Load" and "Tomorrow Is Another Da. It is believed that the character Rhett Butler was inspired by her first husband Red Upshaw, and the character Ashley Wilkes was inspired by her first fiance, the attractive and idealistic Lieutenant Clifford Henry. Henry was killed in France during World War I and Mitchell declared him as the one great love of her life.

An interesting look at Mitchell through the letters she wrote. xxxviii, 441 pages thick 8v. .

Mitchell, Margaret, 1900-1949; Harwell, Richard Barksdale. Books for People with Print Disabilities. Internet Archive Books.


Ces
Bought as gift. Mom's a GWTW collector- she loves it!
Marinara
This is a delightful book. She has such a wit in her letter writing that I found myself all smiles.
WOGY
This is the hard back which has tons of pictures!! The paperback does not. Bought one for me and for a girl friend. Both Happy!
Syleazahad
Enjoyed the history behind the making of Gone with the wind.
Munigrinn
I just love the movie Gone With the Wind and I was excited to find this book on Amazon. I especially cannot wait to read the letters between Margaret Mitchell and the main actors and actress from the movie!
DireRaven
Super nice copy, great packing.
Anararius
The book arrived promptly and in good condition. I haven't had a minute to read it yet, so I'm not sure if I like the content or not. I'm sure I will, since I'm a huge fan of Gone With the Wind.
It is surprisingly unnecessary to have read (or reread) GWTW before reading this collection of letters that deals almost strictly with the book. Miss Mitchell did an excellent job of keeping her life private in her letters for fear that these letters would be published. She made it very clear that she wanted to keep her life private and never wanted to see her letters published. This puts a bit of a damper on reading the letters but does not make them any less enjoyable.

She claimed on many occasions that she was not an historian but merely a story teller who grew up knowing the history of the Civil War as it pertained to Georgia. There are several letters where she painstakingly writes out answers to fans' and critics' questions in regards to historical background and accuracy.

This collection has many excerpts from other people's letters so that the reader is not left in the dark about what/who it is that Miss Mitchell is responding to. There are many letters that are fan letters to other authors, but as the years go on and more and more people send her books that they think she will enjoy, these letters take on a more appreciative tone that implies that she is writing as a colleague and not a fan.

Throughout these letters is a publishing theme that gets increasingly complicated as more and more countries want rights to publish GWTW. She writes in great detail of her troubles and the implications that some of these problems could have on American authors. The last few years of letters are particularly fascinating because she writes about the impact of GWTW in foreign countries who were experiencing the same "troubles" that faced the Confederacy before, during and after a war/occupation.

These letters contain as much history as GWTW does. My only complaint is that this collection wasn't nearly long enough. I sincerely hope that a second volume is published some day.

**Update** Margaret Mitchell and John Marsh: The Love Story Behind Gone With the Wind is a wonderful biography!! It contains a lot of letters written by multiple people. A lot of the letters Margaret Mitchell wrote ended up in this collection of letters, but there are also letters that didn't make it into this collection. (I wrote a review for this biography, if anyone's interested.)

P.S. If you want/need more of her letters, Dynamo Going to Waste: Letters to Allen Edee, 1919-1921 is worth a read. It's a very slim volume (I read it in a few hours) but it gives a glimpse of Margaret Mitchell's earlier life that she probably would not have wanted published (this is actually touched upon in the introduction).