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by Anne Nicholson Weber
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Performing Arts
  • Author:
    Anne Nicholson Weber
  • ISBN:
    0878301860
  • ISBN13:
    978-0878301867
  • Genre:
  • Publisher:
    Routledge; 1 edition (October 29, 2005)
  • Pages:
    188 pages
  • Subcategory:
    Performing Arts
  • Language:
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    1873 kb
  • ePUB format
    1574 kb
  • DJVU format
    1828 kb
  • Rating:
    4.1
  • Votes:
    403
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First Published in 2006. Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read. Start by marking Upstaged: Making Theatre in a Media Age as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read.

First Published in 2006. Routledge is an imprint of Taylor & Francis, an informa.

What, in the end, is the role of live theatre in our media-saturated culture? Anne Nicholson Weber has sought answers from an extraordinary cast of leading actors, playwrights, directors, producers, critics, agents and marketers.

Finding books BookSee BookSee - Download books for free. Upstaged: Making Theatre in the Media Age. Anne Nicholson Weber.

Anne Nicholson Weber has sought answers from an extraordinary cast of. .Those who love theatre will find wisdom and support in this fascinating book.

Anne Nicholson Weber has sought answers from an extraordinary cast of leading actors, playwrights, directors, producers, critics, agents, and marketers. Publisher description: How can theatre thrive in a culture dominated by film and television? Interviews with stage actors, playwrights, theatre directors, and others, including Julie Taymor, Tony Kushner, Anna Deavere Smith, Peter Hall, Wallace Shawn, Frank Rich, Simon Callow, Maggie Gyllenhaal, David Leveaux, Adrian Lester, Nicholas Hytner, Paul Scofield, and Robert Brustein.

Anne Nicholson Weber - Upstaged: Making Theatre in the Media Ag. Anne Noronha Dos Santos - Military intervention and secession in South Asia: the cases of Bangladesh, Sri Lanka, Kashmir, and Punjab.

Anne Nicholson Weber - Upstaged: Making Theatre in the Media Age. Anne Noronha Dos Santos.

Nicholson Weber, Anne. Online ISBN 978-1-137-42587-4. eBook Packages Literature, Cultural and Media Studies. London: Routledge. Personalised recommendations.

Theatre is a novel by the British writer W. Somerset Maugham, first published in 1937 by William Heinemann (UK) and Doubleday Doran (US)

Theatre is a novel by the British writer W. Somerset Maugham, first published in 1937 by William Heinemann (UK) and Doubleday Doran (US).

by Anne Nicholson Weber. First Published in 2006. Routledge is an imprint of Taylor & Francis, an informa company. Select Format: Paperback. ISBN13: 9780878301867. Release Date: October 2005.

The Paperback of the Upstaged: Making Theatre in the Media Age by Anne Nicholson Weber at Barnes & Noble.

The Paperback of the Upstaged: Making Theatre in the Media Age by Anne Nicholson Weber at Barnes & Noble.

First Published in 2006. Routledge is an imprint of Taylor & Francis, an informa company.

Thetalas
Theatre. Is it an age-old instutution which still freshly engages it's audience, or have new advances in media and home entertainment finally rendered the theatre redundant? After reading Anne Nicholson Weber's UPSTAGED: MAKING THEATRE IN THE MEDIA AGE, you'll get a clearer picture of how theatre has kept itself relevant (often against all odds) in an ever-changing world.

Ms Nicholson Weber interviewed 24 notable names from the world of theatre and collected them in this book. Producers, directors, critics and performers, all with different voices and opinions on the state of theatre today. Together, their comments create a fascinating cross-section which readers will no doubt find enthralling, humorous and illuminating.

Maggie Gyllenhaal (the pert and promising young star of "Secretary") talks about the alarming difference between Los Angeles and New York theatre audiences. Sir Peter Hall reveals his impression of Broadway today ("a tourist attraction with plastic musicals that run forever"). Adrian Lester ("Primary Colours") discusses the unspoken hierarchy which prevents talented theatre performers from breaking into major movie roles. And, in one of the most shocking--yet telling--essays, theatre/opera director Michael Kahn talks about talent agents who routinely prevent their clients from seeking roles in the theatre.

You're bound to find your own favourites in the mix. It might be called "The Fabulous Invalid", but Broadway isn't going anywhere in a hurry. The great art of theatre may change; it won't entirely disappear. UPSTAGED will be a valuable volume for those wanting to explore theatre's possibilities in a new age.
kolos
Live theatre has struggled to find its place in a changing world since the 'talkies' came to the big screen - but how does the screen affect modern individual theatre artists and movements, and how does its presentations affect what audiences expect from the theatre? Ann Nicholson Weber's UPSTAGED: MAKING THEATRE IN THE MEDIA AGE provides essays by leading actors, playwrights, directors, producers, agents and more, presenting interviews and conversations which explain the role of the theatre, myths, and acting in modern times. From insights into making a living as a stage actor to facing technological changes, UPSTAGED packs in plenty of tips and insights.
Jube
Anne Nicholson Weber's edited volume UPSTAGED: MAKING THEATRE IN THE MEDIA AGE provides words of wisdom (and humor and criticism) from some of the most creative minds involved in theatre today. I won't list names, but talk about the value of such volumes to every theatre lover's library. Nicholson expertly interviewed scores of writers, directors, performers on the theatrical scene and edited these interviews into thematically organized essays that tell a story about the difficulties and joys of life in making theatre today.

You will find your own favorite sections .. one of mine provides the observations of Martha Lavey, Chicago actress and artistic director of Steppenwolf Theatre Company (and lucky we are to have her here!). Martha reflects on the freedoms the theatrical life provides her as a female in western society:

"Being an acress empowers one with a certain kind of social license. I've gotten away with all kinds of stuff as a woman in a very sexist society on the basis of being an actress. By taking the stage, I demand that you look at me and listen to me. I'm standing on the lighted platform and it's my turn and just listen to me. And that translates to regular life, where I can get away with demanding presence in the room." [p. 26]

Wow. If these kinds of observations are of any interest to you, pick up this volume ... you won't be sorry.
Dawncrusher
"The thrill of seeing a card trick is that a person has done it in front of your eyes - It's thrilling, amazing, you don't know how it's possible. If you see a card trick in a movie, it's just not that kind of feat: a card trick in a movie is almost meaningless." So conjectures Wallace Shawn in Anne Nicholson Weber's wonderful and inspiring collection of conversations entitled Upstaged: Making Theatre in the Media Age.

As a professional magician, I often wonder if live magic performances can survive the age of digital dominance. And so, Shawn's comment is heartening. In fact, Ms. Weber's book is filled with affirmations for those of us who love and live by live performance, but her book doesn't stop there. The two-dozen plus conversations with top theatre professionals managed to delineate for me the theatre's unique strengths. The discussions are intellectual and entertaining. The artists interviewed never theorize, but instead draw from real life examples involving major theatre productions and renowned actors.

Although the book was created over several years through phone conversations, taped face to face meetings, and written correspondence, I still felt like I was sitting in on an intimate group discussion, listening to candid views from the likes of Frank Rich, Julie Taymor, Peter Hall, and Paul Scofield. What gives this impression is the way the various artists use and reuse each others images and criss cross over common themes.

One theme of particular interest to me was the unique communal experience of theatre where audience and performer bond. Robert Falls refers to this as the "communal and spiritual" element of theatre, Julie Taymor in turn speaks of "sacred spaces" and Peter Hall goes all the way to assert that in the theatre we naturally engage in "collective sharing" because "we are a tribal animal". As a variety entertainer myself, I found that Simon Callow drives the message home when he quotes the great British music hall comedian Max Wall: "Ladies and gentlemen, Thank you very much. You have been half."

How did Ms. Weber asssemble such an impressive panel and get them to speak at length and so forthrightly? She must be a magician herself. I also suspect that the assembled artists must have been dying to talk on this subject - so passionate is their discourse. In any case, with the advent of the ipod movie player which renders cinema a pocket sized experiece for one, Upstaged is a timely book. And for anyone who is curious about what makes theatre a unique and essential human experience, Upstaged is a must read.