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by Douglas Shadle
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Music
  • Author:
    Douglas Shadle
  • ISBN:
    0199358648
  • ISBN13:
    978-0199358649
  • Genre:
  • Publisher:
    Oxford University Press; 1 edition (November 6, 2015)
  • Pages:
    344 pages
  • Subcategory:
    Music
  • Language:
  • FB2 format
    1284 kb
  • ePUB format
    1776 kb
  • DJVU format
    1727 kb
  • Rating:
    4.8
  • Votes:
    941
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In chapter 1, Shadle relates the launch of the American symphonic enterprise in the 1830s and 1840s to ideas concerning American culture and national identity around 1800.

Just as Richard Taruskin has challenged the hegemony of the German canon by foregrounding Eastern European artists, so Shadle sheds light on repertories composed in the United States before 1900, as well as on the struggles of native-born musicians to emulate and resist the overwhelming influence of Beethoven and Mendelssohn. A tour de force of scholarship and cultural analysis.

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During the nineteenth century, nearly one hundred symphonies were written by over fifty composers living in the United States. With few exceptions, this repertoire is virtually forgotten today.

By Douglas W. Shadle. He took on all of the composers Shadle discusses in this book and rarely gave more than a pat on the head to composers trying to compete with European monuments.

This book narrates the history of symphonic composition in the United States during the nineteenth century and explains why this substantial repertoire of over one hundred works failed to enter the performance canon of American orchestras

This book narrates the history of symphonic composition in the United States during the nineteenth century and explains why this substantial repertoire of over one hundred works failed to enter the performance canon of American orchestras. Throughout the century, a widespread desire for musical independence from Europe, however defined, stood in sharp contrast to a similarly widespread reverence for music written by European masters such as Ludwig van Beethoven. Faced with choices about which side to take, aspiring composers stood in the middle

During the nineteenth century, nearly one hundred symphonies were written by over fifty composers living in the United States. Throughout the century, Americans longed for a distinct national musical identity

To see innovation, Henderson (and others) needed to forget.

It is the first comprehensive survey of American nineteenth-century orchestral music.

The American DSM-III-R’s (1988) circumscribed, descriptive definition seems to correlate with the future European ICD-10

Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2015. The American DSM-III-R’s (1988) circumscribed, descriptive definition seems to correlate with the future European ICD-10. Gunderson and Masterson.

During the nineteenth century, nearly one hundred symphonies were written by over fifty composers living in the United States. With few exceptions, this repertoire is virtually forgotten today. In Orchestrating the Nation: The Nineteenth-Century American Symphonic Enterprise, author Douglas W. Shadle explores the stunning stylistic diversity of this substantial repertoire and uncovers why it failed to enter the musical mainstream.Throughout the century, Americans longed for a distinct national musical identity. As the most prestigious of all instrumental genres, the symphony proved to be a potent vehicle in this project as composers found inspiration for their works in a dazzling array of subjects, including Niagara Falls, Hiawatha, and Western pioneers. With a wealth of musical sources at his disposal, including never-before-examined manuscripts, Shadle reveals how each component of the symphonic enterprise-from its composition, to its performance, to its immediate and continued reception by listeners and critics-contributed to competing visions of American identity.Employing an innovative transnational historical framework, Shadle's narrative covers three continents and shows how the music of major European figures such as Beethoven, Schumann, Wagner, Liszt, Brahms, and Dvorák exerted significant influence over dialogues about the future of American musical culture. Shadle demonstrates that the perceived authority of these figures allowed snobby conductors, capricious critics, and even orchestral musicians themselves to thwart the efforts of American symphonists despite widespread public support of their music. Consequently, these works never entered the performing canons of American orchestras.An engagingly written account of a largely unknown repertoire, Orchestrating the Nation shows how artistic and ideological debates from the nineteenth century continue to shape the culture of American orchestral music today.

Hatе&love
There has been very little written about American serious music and this book is all the more valuable for this topic. I recommend it for anyone remotely interested in this quite forgotten important subject.
Kulasius
Outstanding book, dealing with the great strengths of American musicians in the 19th Century.