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by Mary Sue Welsh
Download One Woman in a Hundred: Edna Phillips and the Philadelphia Orchestra (Music in American Life) fb2
Music
  • Author:
    Mary Sue Welsh
  • ISBN:
    0252037367
  • ISBN13:
    978-0252037368
  • Genre:
  • Publisher:
    University of Illinois Press; 1st edition (February 1, 2013)
  • Pages:
    288 pages
  • Subcategory:
    Music
  • Language:
  • FB2 format
    1480 kb
  • ePUB format
    1443 kb
  • DJVU format
    1431 kb
  • Rating:
    4.2
  • Votes:
    924
  • Formats:
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Gifted harpist Edna Phillips (1907–2003) joined the Philadelphia Orchestra in 1930, becoming not only that ensemble's first . A refreshing addition to the literature on women in music history.

Gifted harpist Edna Phillips (1907–2003) joined the Philadelphia Orchestra in 1930, becoming not only that ensemble's first female member but also the first woman to hold a principal position in a major American orchestra. Plucked from the Curtis Institute of Music in the midst of her studies.

Edna Phillips was an important figure not only in Philadelphia history but also in the history of the American symphony orchestra.

Drawing on archival sources and extensive interviews with Phillips, her family, and colleagues, Welsh chronicles the training, aspirations, setbacks, and successes of this pioneering woman musician. The first woman to hold a principal position in a major American orchestra, opened the symphonic world to women. Edna Phillips was an important figure not only in Philadelphia history but also in the history of the American symphony orchestra.

Gifted harpist Edna Phillips (1907–2003) joined the Philadelphia Orchestra in 1930, becoming not only that ensemble's first female member but also the first woman to hold a principal position in a major American orchestra

Gifted harpist Edna Phillips (1907–2003) joined the Philadelphia Orchestra in 1930, becoming not only that ensemble's first female member but also the first woman to hold a principal position in a major American orchestra. Plucked from the Curtis Institute of Music in the midst of her studies, Phillips was only twenty-three years old when Leopold Stokowski, one of the twentieth century's most innovative and controversial conductors, named her principal harpist

Gifted harpist Edna Phillips (1907-2003) joined the Philadelphia .

Gifted harpist Edna Phillips (1907-2003) joined the Philadelphia Orchestra in 1930, becoming not only that ensemble's first female member but also the first. Plucked from the Curtis Institute of Music in the midst of her studies, Phillips was only twenty-three years old when Leopold Stokowski, one of the twentieth century's most innovative and controversial conductors, named her principal harpist. Mary Sue Welsh recounts numerous insider stories of rehearsal and performance with Stokowski and other renowned conductors of the period such as Arturo Toscanini, Fritz Reiner, Otto Klemperer, Sir Thomas Beecham, and Eugene Ormandy.

Gifted harpist Edna Phillips (1907–2003) joined the Philadelphia . Mary Sue Walsh's One Woman in a Hundred gives us all the details

Gifted harpist Edna Phillips (1907–2003) joined the Philadelphia Orchestra in 1930, becoming not only that ensemble's first female member but also the first woman to hold a principal position in a major American orchestra. This portrait of Phillips's exceptional tenure with the Philadelphia Orchestra also reveals the behind-the-scenes life of a famous orchestra during a period in which Rachmaninoff declared it "the finest orchestra the world has ever heard. Mary Sue Walsh's One Woman in a Hundred gives us all the details. Edna Phillips had only been playing the harp since she was eighteen, but she had had piano lessons before then.

One Woman in a Hundred, Edna Phillips and the Philadelphia Orchestra, a book by Mary .

One Woman in a Hundred, Edna Phillips and the Philadelphia Orchestra, a book by Mary Sue Welsh that chronicles the life of the iconic harpist, has finally been released after many years in the making. The book has been published by the University of Illinois Press as part of their Music in American Lifeseries. Edna Phillips gained the distinction of being the first woman to hold a principal position in a major American Orchestra when she joined the Philadelphia Orchestra in 1930 at the age of 23.

Author Mary Sue Welsh recently penned Phillips' biography, One Woman . Phillips ended up retiring and went on to do other things in the music world, says Welsh.

Author Mary Sue Welsh recently penned Phillips' biography, One Woman in a Hundred: Edna Phillips and the Philadelphia Orchestra, about Phillips' life in the orchestra, how she survived in a world dominated by men, and why her story is relevant for today's women. Phillips joined the Philadelphia Orchestra when she was just 23 years old, after the famous conductor Leopold Stokowski discovered her through her teacher and Stokowski's friend Carlos Salzedo, who is generally regarded as history's greatest harpist.

Gifted harpist Edna Phillips (1907-­2003) joined the Philadelphia Orchestra in 1930, becoming not only that ensemble's first female member but also the first woman to hold a principal position in a major American orchestra. Plucked from the Curtis. 0. get from feedbooks.

A biography by writer Mary Sue Welsh reveals what it was like to be the first woman to enter the all-male sanctum of The Philadelphia Orchestra in the 1930s. WRTI’s Meridee Duddleston discovered the powerful combination of talent and fear

A biography by writer Mary Sue Welsh reveals what it was like to be the first woman to enter the all-male sanctum of The Philadelphia Orchestra in the 1930s. WRTI’s Meridee Duddleston discovered the powerful combination of talent and fear. On September 14, 1930, the headline of The Philadelphia Public Ledger read: "Solo Harpist to Be First Girl in Philadelphia Orchestra. A young Edna Phillips entered the single-sex fortress of The Philadelphia Orchestra in 1930 - a year after pianist Sergei Rachmaninoff called it "the finest orchestra the world has ever heard.

Gifted harpist Edna Phillips (1907–2003) joined the Philadelphia Orchestra in 1930, becoming not only that ensemble's first female member but also the first woman to hold a principal position in a major American orchestra. Plucked from the Curtis Institute of Music in the midst of her studies, Phillips was only twenty-three years old when Leopold Stokowski, one of the twentieth century's most innovative and controversial conductors, named her principal harpist. This candid, colorful account traces Phillips's journey through the competitive realm of Philadelphia's virtuoso players, where she survived--and thrived--thanks to her undeniable talent, determination, and lively humor. Drawing on extensive interviews with Phillips, her family, and colleagues as well as archival sources, One Woman in a Hundred chronicles the training, aspirations, setbacks, and successes of this pioneering woman musician. Mary Sue Welsh recounts numerous insider stories of rehearsal and performance with Stokowski and other renowned conductors of the period such as Arturo Toscanini, Fritz Reiner, Otto Klemperer, Sir Thomas Beecham, and Eugene Ormandy. She also depicts Phillips's interactions with fellow performers, the orchestra management, and her teacher, the wily and brilliant Carlos Salzedo. Blessed with a nimble wit, Phillips navigated a plethora of challenges, ranging from false conductors' cues to the advances of the debonair Stokowski and others. She remained with the orchestra through some of its most exciting years from 1930 to 1946 and was instrumental in fostering harp performance, commissioning many significant contributions to the literature.  This portrait of Phillips's exceptional tenure with the Philadelphia Orchestra also reveals the behind-the-scenes life of a famous orchestra during a period in which Rachmaninoff declared it "the finest orchestra the world has ever heard." Through Phillips's perceptive eyes, readers will watch as Stokowski melds his musicians into a marvelously flexible ensemble; world-class performers reach great heights and make embarrassing flubs; Greta Garbo comes to Philadelphia to observe her lover Leopold Stokowski at work; and the orchestra encounters the novel experience of recording for Walt Disney's Fantasia. A colorful glimpse into a world-class orchestra at the height of its glory, One Woman in a Hundred tells the fascinating story of one woman brave enough and strong enough to overcome historic barriers and pursue her dreams.

Aradwyn
It is a pleasure to read a well written biography that leaves one more informed and knowledeable about not just the subject of the biography but also the other major players in the life of the person. In the case of Edna Phillips these key people included Leopold Stokowski, Eugene Ormandy, Carlos Salzedo and, above all others, her husband, a leading business leader and member of the Board of the Philadelphia Orchestra in which Edna was principal harp for over a decade from the mid 1930s. We learn about harp technique, but in a non-technical way, we learn about the extraordinary musicianship and energy of her teacher Carlos Salzedo. For those interested in the career of Stokowski and perhaps already have a biography by Oliver Daniel or Chasins, here we have additional material that is mostly new and which gives Edna's recollections of touring with both the Philadelphians and the All American Youth Orchestra trip to South America.

Above all we have a picture of Edna Phillips, a principal musician in a major American Orchestra in the 30s at a time when such a thing verged on the scandalous. Women have finally been admitted to the Vienna Philharmomic some 70 odd years later. Edna was a pioneer and a more influential musician than I had previously understood. For harp aficianados this is a MUST HAVE not least because there is an excellent appendix with Phillips' commissions for the instrument listed with details of first performances etc.
Tygrarad
Mary Sue Welsh's "One Woman in a Hundred" is both a fine biography and an enlightening history. Her principal subject, Philadelphia Orchestra first harpist Edna Phillips, was the first woman to play in a major American orchestra. As her story unfolds, not only do we learn about her trials and triumphs but also about the development of the great Philadelphia Orchestra and its two long-term conductors: Leopold Stokowski and Eugene Ormandy. It is a fascinating tour of the inner workings an orchestra and as much a study of Stokowski and Ormandy as it is of Phillips.
Edna Phillips was a great story teller, a great musician, and an ideal source for Welsh's terrific book. Beautifully written, it's a fine look at how women were treated in the '20s and '30s. We learn a lot about Phillips to be sure. We also learn a lot about orchestras. their leaders and their role in society during the 20th century. It's a book of great value and sensitive insight.
Hudora
This autobiography/biography of Edna Phillips was one filled with head-nodding antidotes that made me smile as I too remembered my experiences playing with orchestras during my rather insignifcant career as an orchestral harpist. Edna carried herself through her time with dignity and resolve and althought her time was early 20th century, the sttitudes carried through as late as the 60s, when females were still considered "fair game" by the "good ole boys" of the orchertras. Although the subject of the book was a harpist, many a female muscian will appreciate her tale.
Downloaded
I love the Philadelphia Orchestra and this provided many insights into its rise as a major institution and into some of best known music.The book is historically interesting.The subject is reasonably well drawn but I don't feel as if I know her well and the book leaves you with a desire to know more and therefore find another book.
An easy, pleasant and often amusing read.
Brannylv
My father graduated from Curtis and was in the Philadelphia Orchestra at the same time. This book brought back so many stories that he shared with our family and gave me an extra insight as to what his life was like under the direction of Stoki! He also often remarked about the lovely hands that the harpist had so I really enjoyed her story. A truly wonderful enlightening read.
fabscf
Loved this book!! Anyone who has ever been to hear the Philadelphia Orchestra would enjoy this book.
Such a great back story of Edna Phillips and her acceptance into the larger group as the only woman.
Dukinos
A fascinating, engaging book. A wonderful history of the Philadelphian orchestra and Stokowski in addition to the trials and tribulations of being the first woman in history to play in this orchestra.
ONE WOMAN IN A HUNDRED IS A NICE BOOK,JUST THAT ,NOT A GREAT BOOK. HOWEVER I ENJOYED IT BECAUSE I
LIKE THE PHILADELPHIA ORCHESTRA AND IT WAS INTERESTING TO READ ABOUT THE MACHINATIONS AND
POLITICKING IN THE ORGANIZATION