» » Breakout: Profiles in African Rhythm

Download Breakout: Profiles in African Rhythm fb2

by Gary Stewart
Download Breakout: Profiles in African Rhythm fb2
Music
  • Author:
    Gary Stewart
  • ISBN:
    0226774066
  • ISBN13:
    978-0226774060
  • Genre:
  • Publisher:
    University of Chicago Press; 1 edition (June 1, 1992)
  • Pages:
    168 pages
  • Subcategory:
    Music
  • Language:
  • FB2 format
    1641 kb
  • ePUB format
    1618 kb
  • DJVU format
    1961 kb
  • Rating:
    4.1
  • Votes:
    311
  • Formats:
    doc lit docx azw


BREAKOUT remains impenetrable for the average reader who does not already know quite a bit about African music.

His 1992 book is a collection of 14 sketches of individual musicians, compiled by interview or general media sources. BREAKOUT remains impenetrable for the average reader who does not already know quite a bit about African music. Stewart snows you under with a huge deluge of names--bands, musicians, studio owners, impresarios, et. as well as song and album titles, so much so that at times, the book resembles a catalogue.

Start by marking Breakout: Profiles in African Rhythm as Want to Read . The first book on African pop music to look closely at the lives of the musicians themselves, Breakout deals with four African musical genres: soukous, highlife, afro-beat, and palm wine.

Start by marking Breakout: Profiles in African Rhythm as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read. Amid Africa's deepening economic and political crises of the last two decades, African musicians who developed these genres faced the need to cross cultural boundaries, or "break out," and achieve a hit in the international marketplace.

by. Stewart, Gary, 1944-.

Top. American Libraries Canadian Libraries Universal Library Community Texts Project Gutenberg Biodiversity Heritage Library Children's Library. by. High times, hard times : Hedzoleh Soundz - The beat goes on : Olatunji - The dawn of afro-beat : Orlando Julius Ekemode - Soul brother number one : Joni Haastrup - An African musician : Fela Anikulapo-Kuti - Politics and papa's land : Sonny Okosuns.

Find many great new & used options and get the best deals for Breakout: Profiles in African Rhythm by Gary .

The first book on African pop music to look closely at the lives of the musicians themselves, Breakout deals with four African musical genres: soukous, highlife, afro-beat, and palm wine.

knew from personal experience," and felt "the rhythm is entrancing without being overpowering;" he described "Kifo" and "Pamella" as highlights.

Recommend this journal.

Gary Stewart is a writer who has lived and worked in Africa He is the author of Breakout: Profiles in African Rhythm and Rumba on the River: A History o. .

Gary Stewart is a writer who has lived and worked in Africa. His articles on African and Caribbean music have appeared in numerous publications including The Beat, Option, and West Africa. He is the author of Breakout: Profiles in African Rhythm and Rumba on the River: A History of the Popular Music of the Two Congos-for more information on the latter, visit rumbaontheriver.

Based on exclusive interviews, "Breakout" tells the often riveting personal stories of fourteen popular musicians some well known, others not from Zaire, Ghana, Nigeria and Sierra Leone.

Breakout: Profiles in African Rhythm. Coauthors & Alternates. ISBN 9780226774053 (978-0-226-77405-3) Hardcover, University Of Chicago Press, 1992. Find signed collectible books: 'Breakout: Profiles in African Rhythm'. Downwinder dance: A play in two acts.

Gary Stewart, Breakout: Profiles in African Rhythm (Chicago, 1992) .

Gary Stewart, Breakout: Profiles in African Rhythm (Chicago, 1992): 1. oogle Scholar. François Bensignor, An Introduction to African Music in 100 CDs/Pour connaître les musiques africaines, Afrique en scènes: supplément au no. 6 (December 1996): 1. 72. Philippe Conrath, Johnny Clegg: la passion zoulou (Paris, 1988). See TE, L;amour de la patrie: L’apparition et le développement du sentiment national en France, Le Monde (March 29, 1991): 11.

Based on exclusive interviews, Breakout tells the often riveting personal stories of fourteen popular musicians—some well known, others not—from Zaire, Ghana, Nigeria and Sierra Leone. The first book on African pop music to look closely at the lives of the musicians themselves, Breakout deals with four African musical genres: soukous, highlife, afro-beat, and palm wine.Amid Africa's deepening economic and political crises of the last two decades, African musicians who developed these genres faced the need to cross cultural boundaries, or "break out," and achieve a hit in the international marketplace. Challenging conventional assumptions, Gary Stewart demonstrates for the first time the true dimensions of this struggle to create music that will qualify as both an authentic cultural expression and an export commodity. From accounts of the outrageous Fela, who snipes at African leaders and recounts his days with Isis in ancient Egypt, to S. E. Rogie, who lurches from the pinnacle of stardom in West Africa to delivering pizzas in California, to Olatunji, who finds new life with the Grateful Dead, these are the stories of Africans straddling traditional life and an encroaching modernity—and also the stories of third world musicians surmounting political and economic chaos at home and carrying their music to a world dominated by Western cultural and economic power.

Dddasuk
Ever since the early 1960s, when I had a Ghanaian roommate and attended some enormous Nigerian student parties in which the old wooden buildings fairly shook to the beat of highlife records, I have loved African pop music. Whether West African highlife, the Congolese music later known as soukous, Nigerian juju music with "King" Sunny Ade and Ebenezer Obey, the township jive and mbaqanga of South Africa, or the exciting rhythms and griot style singing of Senegal and Mali, I've been listening all these years. Listening. Not reading. Come to think of it, I really did not know much about the people who made all this music. I picked up BREAKOUT as an antidote to my lack of knowledge, hoping to learn more about the whole African music scene as well.
Gary Stewart obviously likes African pop music and has a wide familiarity with all the records, tapes, and styles that exist, at least in his chosen areas----Sierra Leone, Ghana, Nigeria, Congo, and Tanzania. His 1992 book is a collection of 14 sketches of individual musicians, compiled by interview or general media sources. Some interviews, for example, those with Olatunji and Fela, are far more interesting and colorful than others which remain very bland and general. Several patterns emerge--the difficulty of getting started in countries where average income is low and instruments are expensive; the difficulty of breaking into the Euro-American markets and music scene. The author's own comments on African pop music or the musicians are missing, as is an organized, overall picture of pop music in West and Central Africa. (The above-mentioned trials and tribulations of being a pop musician in Africa do emerge from the text, albeit in haphazard fashion.) I suppose we must wait for Stewart's second book or turn somewhere else. BREAKOUT remains impenetrable for the average reader who does not already know quite a bit about African music. Stewart snows you under with a huge deluge of names---bands, musicians, studio owners, impresarios, etc.-as well as song and album titles, so much so that at times, the book resembles a catalogue. I discovered that I had a treasure here---when I go shopping for African CDs or tapes, I can use BREAKOUT as a guide. In this way, I would say the book is extremely useful, but to sit down and read from cover to cover, well, maybe 3 stars are enough.
Alsardin
This book is a bit dated, many of the "breakout" stories are of people who have passed or don't even perform anymore. That said, Stewart is a good writer, very well informed on the subject matter, and extremely dedicated to the music and musicians. At the time it was written, there was a surge in popularity of world music, especially African styles. What strikes me while reading this book is that as hard as times were for musicians to "break out" back then, they were the glory days compared to our current reality.
For fans of Congolese music and African music in general, I highly recommend "Rumba on the River"... almost Shakespearian in comparison, the stories of the rise (and some would say, fall) of Congo Rumba/Soukous are incredibly well archived, and now through the internet, almost all of the music is available.

For fans of world music and African culture in general, Gary's books are a sure bet!

Damien Masterson