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by Brian Currid
Download A National Acoustics: Music and Mass Publicity in Weimar and Nazi Germany fb2
Music
  • Author:
    Brian Currid
  • ISBN:
    0816640416
  • ISBN13:
    978-0816640416
  • Genre:
  • Publisher:
    Univ Of Minnesota Press; 1 edition (August 28, 2006)
  • Pages:
    312 pages
  • Subcategory:
    Music
  • Language:
  • FB2 format
    1454 kb
  • ePUB format
    1398 kb
  • DJVU format
    1724 kb
  • Rating:
    4.9
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    470
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Brian Currid, a scholar of German music and media studies in Berlin, uses an examination of Weimar and Nazi era .

Currid's diffuse argument runs along the following lines: Scholars of Weimar and National Socialist Germany have tended to see the "masses" as easily manipulated objects of state propaganda or commercial culture.

In A National Acoustics, Brian Currid challenges this reductive characterization by investigating the transformations of music in mass culture from the Weimar Republic to the end of the Nazi regime. Offering a nuanced analysis of how publicity was constructed through radio programming, print media, popular song, and film, Currid examines how German citizens developed an emotional investment in the nation and other forms of collectivity that were tied to the sonic experience

A National Acoustics book

A National Acoustics book. Start by marking A National Acoustics: Music and Mass Publicity in Weimar and Nazi Germany as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read.

In A National Acoustics, Brian Currid investigates the transformations of music in mass culture from the Weimar Republic to the end of the Nazi regime

In A National Acoustics, Brian Currid investigates the transformations of music in mass culture from the Weimar Republic to the end of the Nazi regime. Currid illustrates the contradictions between Germany's social and cultural histories and how the technologies of recording were vital to the emergence of a national imaginary and exposed the fault lines in the contested terrain of mass communication. eISBN: 978-0-8166-9419-8. Introduction: German Sounds, Sounding German, and the Acoustics of Publicity. Many of us have a distinct impression of thesoundof Nazi Germany.

a b Currid, Brian (2006). A National Acoustics: Music and Mass Publicity in Weimar and Nazi Germany. Minneapolis, MN: University of Minnesota Press. ISBN 978-0-8166-4042-3. Lonergan, David F. (2005). Hit Records, 1950–1975. Lanham, MD: Scarecrow Press. p. 247. ISBN 0-8108-5129-6.

With A National Acoustics, Brian Currid upends some of the more stubborn clichés concerning musical mass culture in Germany during the first half of the 20th century

With A National Acoustics, Brian Currid upends some of the more stubborn clichés concerning musical mass culture in Germany during the first half of the 20th century. In uncovering the sonic traces of the period, Currid does not limit his analysis to so-called musical content (what kinds of music were played and to what audience), but examines how this music was produced, transmitted, and heard, and thereby convincingly demonstrates the interconnections between music, new media technologies such as radio and film, and the social sphere.

In "A National Acoustics," Brian Currid challenges this reductive characterization by investigating the transformations of music in mass culture from the Weimar Republic to the end of the Nazi regime.

New List New Article New Book New Video New Post New Score ne. Van De Bildt, I. (2008) A National Acoustics.

New List New Article New Book New Video New Post New Score new. Home Journals Popular Music 2008 Vol. 27 No. 1. A National Acoustics. Music and Mass Publicity in Weimar and Nazi Germany, by Brian Currid. In: Popular Music, Vol. 27, No. 1, pp. 172-173.

Music and Mass Publicity in Weimar and Nazi Germany. Published August 28, 2006 by Univ Of Minnesota Press.

A sound track of Germany in the early twentieth century might conjure military music and the voice of Adolf Hitler rising above a cheering crowd. In A National Acoustics, Brian Currid challenges this reductive characterization by investigating the transformations of music in mass culture from the Weimar Republic to the end of the Nazi regime. Offering a nuanced analysis of how publicity was constructed through radio programming, print media, popular song, and film, Currid examines how German citizens developed an emotional investment in the nation and other forms of collectivity that were tied to the sonic experience. Reading in detail popular genres of music—the Schlager (or “hit”), so-called gypsy music, and jazz—he offers a complex view of how they played a part in the creation of German culture. A National Acoustics contributes to a new understanding of what constitutes the public sphere. In doing so, it illustrates the contradictions between Germany’s social and cultural histories and how the technologies of recording not only were vital to the emergence of a national imaginary but also exposed the fault lines in the contested terrain of mass communication. Brian Currid is an independent scholar who lives in Berlin.