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by Scott Saul
Download Freedom Is, Freedom Ain't: Jazz and the Making of the Sixties fb2
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  • Author:
    Scott Saul
  • ISBN:
    0674018532
  • ISBN13:
    978-0674018532
  • Genre:
  • Publisher:
    Harvard University Press (November 30, 2005)
  • Pages:
    408 pages
  • Subcategory:
    Music
  • Language:
  • FB2 format
    1890 kb
  • ePUB format
    1193 kb
  • DJVU format
    1332 kb
  • Rating:
    4.6
  • Votes:
    780
  • Formats:
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Freedom Is, Freedom Ain't offers more than simply a thoroughly-drawn thesis, it is also a story of the ideas .

Freedom Is, Freedom Ain't offers more than simply a thoroughly-drawn thesis, it is also a story of the ideas and visionaries-a diverse cast of thinkers and dreamers and activists-who shook up American politics and culture. We've been living in the aftershock ever since-whether we know it or not-and Scott Saul explores the rubble. He delves and reveals, finding the roots of today's pop culture issues in the boldest principles and performances of the past. Scott Saul's subject is the explosion of revolutionary jazz in the 1950s and 1960s driven by an engagement with the Black Power movement and the anti-suburban hipster counterculture.

Scott Saul's Freedom Is, Freedom Ain't is that rarity in academic studies: a book one is. .These examples are offered as proof of the turn towards "soul jazz" in the late Sixties. In parallel to soul jazz, some black musicians began developing artists' collectives (such as Chicago's AACM).

Scott Saul's Freedom Is, Freedom Ain't is that rarity in academic studies: a book one is tempted to read a second time purely for pleasure. Saul writes with a musician's working knowledge of craft and a cultural journalist's narrative and stylistic panache. In trying to be so comprehensive, "Freedom Is, Freedom Ain't" at times seems sprawling and diffuse.

Freedom Is, Freedom Ain't is the first book to tell the broader story of this period in jazz-and American-history. The story's central figures are jazz musicians like Coltrane and Mingus, who rewrote the conventions governing improvisation and composition as they sought to infuse jazz with that grittyexuberance known as "soul.

Freedom Is, Freedom Ain't book.

В чем различия русского и украинского языков?

Scott Saul’s Freedom Is, Freedom Ain’t is that rarity in academic studies: a book one is tempted to read a second time purely for pleasure. Saul writes with a musician’s working knowledge of craft and a cultural journalist’s narrative and stylistic panache

Scott Saul’s Freedom Is, Freedom Ain’t is that rarity in academic studies: a book one is tempted to read a second time purely for pleasure. Saul writes with a musician’s working knowledge of craft and a cultural journalist’s narrative and stylistic panache. Adam Gussow, American Literature. back to Faculty Books.

Freedom Is, Freedom Ain't. Jazz and the Making of the Sixties

Freedom Is, Freedom Ain't. Jazz and the Making of the Sixties. In the long decade between the mid-fifties and the late sixties, jazz was changing more than its sound.

Scott Saul is a professor of English at the University of California–Berkeley. He is the author of Freedom Is, Freedom Ain’t: Jazz and the Making of the Sixties. His writing has appeared in Harper’s, the New York Times, and The Nation, among other publications. He lives in Berkeley, California.

Philadelphia: University of Pennsylvania Press, 2007. Ingrid Monson, Freedom Sounds: Civil Rights Call Out to Jazz and Africa. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2007. Scott Saul, Freedom Is, Freedom Ain’t: Jazz and the Making of the Sixties. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press, 2003. Do you want to read the rest of this article? Request full-text.

Lists Forum Books Performance Data new. Ephemera Libretto Instruments. New List New Article New Book New Video New Post New Score new. Home Journals Critical Studies in Improvisation 2005 Vol. 1 No. 2. Freedom Is, Freedom Ain’t. Robinson, Jason (2005) Freedom Is, Freedom Ain’t: Jazz and the Making of the Sixties.

In the long decade between the mid-fifties and the late sixties, jazz was changing more than its sound. The age of Max Roach's Freedom Now Suite, John Coltrane's A Love Supreme, and Charles Mingus's The Black Saint and the Sinner Lady was a time when jazz became both newly militant and newly seductive, its example powerfully shaping the social dramas of the Civil Rights movement, the Black Power movement, and the counterculture. Freedom Is, Freedom Ain't is the first book to tell the broader story of this period in jazz--and American--history. The story's central figures are jazz musicians like Coltrane and Mingus, who rewrote the conventions governing improvisation and composition as they sought to infuse jazz with that gritty exuberance known as "soul." Scott Saul describes how these and other jazz musicians of the period engaged in a complex cultural balancing act: utopian and skeptical, race-affirming and cosmopolitan, they tried to create an art that would make uplift into something forceful, undeniable in its conviction, and experimental in its search for new possibilities. Freedom Is, Freedom Ain't considers these musicians and their allies as a cultural front of the Civil Rights movement, a constellation of artists and intellectuals whose ideas of freedom pushed against a cold-war consensus that stressed rational administration and collective security. Capturing the social resonance of the music's marriage of discipline and play, the book conveys the artistic and historical significance of the jazz culture at the start, and the heart, of the sixties.