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by Richard Taruskin
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Music
  • Author:
    Richard Taruskin
  • ISBN:
    0195169794
  • ISBN13:
    978-0195169799
  • Genre:
  • Publisher:
    Oxford University Press; First Edition edition (January 6, 2005)
  • Pages:
    4272 pages
  • Subcategory:
    Music
  • Language:
  • FB2 format
    1559 kb
  • ePUB format
    1824 kb
  • DJVU format
    1157 kb
  • Rating:
    4.7
  • Votes:
    631
  • Formats:
    doc docx azw txt


FREE shipping on qualifying offers. Anonymous IV's whining that Taruskin "rushes through more than 1000 years of music history" is no less mystifying

FREE shipping on qualifying offers. The Oxford History of Western Music is a magisterial survey of the traditions of Western music by one of the most prominent and provocative musicologists of our time. This text illuminates. Anonymous IV's whining that Taruskin "rushes through more than 1000 years of music history" is no less mystifying.

The Oxford History of Western Music (6 Volume Set). This set of reference books is very highly acclaimed. 0195169794 (ISBN13: 9780195169799). The five volumes cover Western music from the beginnings of Western musical notation up to the late twentieth century. Sep 20, 2014 Lufan rated it it was amazing.

The universally acclaimed and award-winning Oxford History of Western Music is the eminent musicologist Richard Taruskin's .

The universally acclaimed and award-winning Oxford History of Western Music is the eminent musicologist Richard Taruskin's provocative, erudite telling of the story of Western music from its earliest days to the present. Each book in this superlative five-volume set illuminates-through a representative sampling of masterworks-the themes, styles, and currents that give shape and direction to a significant period in the history of Western music.

The Oxford History of Western Music is a narrative history from the "earliest notations" (taken to be around the eighth century) to the late twentieth century. It was written by the American musicologist Richard Taruskin. Published by Oxford University Press in 2005, it is a five volume work on the various significant periods of Western music and their characteristic qualities, events and composition styles.

new Oxford History of Western Music. inally contracted book. The first volume documents the history of the. earliest notated music until 1600. over 4000 pages, divided over six volumes, the. last of which contains references, tables and. various indices.

Taking a critical perspective, this text sets the details of music, the . The sixth volume contains a comprehensive chronology, further reading, and an index to the entire set. Categories: Art\Music, History.

Taking a critical perspective, this text sets the details of music, the chronological sweep of figures, works, and musical ideas, within the larger context of world affairs and cultural history. Volume: 1. Год: 2015.

Complete Hardcover 6 Volume Set). Richard Taruskin - Oxford University Press. Oxford History of Western Music. Complete Hardcover 6 Volume Set). The universally acclaimed and award-winning "Oxford History of Western Music" is an authoritative survey of the traditions of Western music by one of the most prominent and provocative musicologists of our time, Richard Taruskin

The sixth volume provides a comprehensive chronology, further reading .

Taking a critical perspective that challenges the received wisdom of the field, Richard Taruskin sets the details of music, the chronological sweep of figures, works, and musical ideas, within the larger context of world affairs and cultural history

The universally acclaimed and award-winning Oxford History of Western Music by one of the most prominent and provocative musicologists of our time, Richard Taruskin.

The universally acclaimed and award-winning Oxford History of Western Music by one of the most prominent and provocative musicologists of our time, Richard Taruskin. All five books are also being offered in a shrink wrapped set for a discounted price.

Richard Taruskin, The Oxford History of Western Music jeroen van gessel 6-volume set New York et. Oxford University Press, 2005 ISBN 0-1951-6979-4 4175 blz. 1800 voorbeelden Prijs: c. Taruskins concept of music history has always been connected to music theory, as he once stressed in a reaction to Kofi Agawus claim that music theory and music history were completely separate disciplines. 14 Taruskin analyses with great skill, precision and clarity, and has an undeniable flair for discussing even the potentially most arid subjects with a liveliness that few can equal.

The Oxford History of Western Music is a magisterial survey of the traditions of Western music by one of the most prominent and provocative musicologists of our time. This text illuminates, through a representative sampling of masterworks, those themes, styles, and currents that give shape and direction to each musical age. Taking a critical perspective, this text sets the details of music, the chronological sweep of figures, works, and musical ideas, within the larger context of world affairs and cultural history. Written by an authoritative, opinionated, and controversial figure in musicology, The Oxford History of Western Music provides a critical aesthetic position with respect to individual works, a context in which each composition may be evaluated and remembered. Taruskin combines an emphasis on structure and form with a discussion of relevant theoretical concepts in each age, to illustrate how the music itself works, and how contemporaries heard and understood it. It also describes how the context of each stylistic period--key cultural, historical, social, economic, and scientific events--influenced and directed compositional choices.

lolike
Comprehensive and highly entertaining, too. A wonderful counterbalance to the dry and bland versions of the same thing.
Taun
This 6-volume history is both entertaining and highly idiosyncratic. For a 'survey', that's an unusual combination, but in this case the idiosyncracies are a great advantage. The reader is treated to a comprehensive tour of Western music, from a cultural perspective infused with brilliant social and political insights. For example, the extended discussion of 'Romanticism' and 'The Folk', with all the psycho-social baggage attendant to the latter is a stunning tour-de-force. You won't agree with all of Taruskin's observations: the charm he finds in Mozart's 'Magic Flute' (with its high dose of 'Das Volk') falls flat with me. Mozart wrote several operas head and shoulders above that one, to my ears. But one need not agree with Taruskin to find the journey wondrously edifying.

As history, Taruskin's work is surprisingly readable. I learned more about the history of Europe in the Middle Ages from Volume I than I ever could have from a straight history book.

In the end, the achievement of these books is awe-inspiring. If you love 'Classical Music' (Taruskin is at his best taking that loaded phrase apart) you will find Taruskin's large-scale meditation on the subject both a challenge and a delight.
Bloodhammer
I learned so much from this book. Every page is packed with fresh information. I liked that the author was not rigid in his opinions either.
INvait
Music is written in historical and social context, and that's what the Taruskin does. Not only that, but the technical analysis is wonderful. I especially enjoyed volume 4, and the analysis of Tchaik, R Strauss, and Stravinsky. (check out the "omnibus progression" explanation). it's all good though,. The quotes are pithy and to the points Taruskin makes.

I liked the prose VERY much. I find Grout to be very difficult to plow through, and often incoherent in its sequential organization, a very difficult textbook. This new edition is most welcome, a stunning feat of scholarship, musicianship, and prose. it's thrilling, and the college library where i teach is being plundered, one volume at a time. (No, I'm not stealing the books, just monopolizing them)
Mikale
This work is amazing in every way, a magisterial survey that has long been needed. It equals Edward Gibbon stylistically for starters. It is a model for all such historical works in the arts: music, poetry etc. We need such surveys of the arts by a single person. The section on Britten gets him absolutely right and "Max" is a hoot (Sir Peter Maxwell Davies, Master of the Queen of Britain's Music since 2002). One problem is that the Index is in typography that is too small for easy reading. I also cannot see the value in the hardcover despite the work's brilliance. This work far surpasses Lang, the prior survey, now very outdated with new knowledge and discoveries. One omission is that the author does nto deal with non European and US "western" music (eg in China, Japan, Australia, South America etc) but you can't have everything. A paperback is urgently needed.

Paul Knobel

Australia citizen

(written in the Linrary of Congress, Washington DC, the world's greatest library)
Steelraven
"Anonymous IV" has a right, of course, to dislike Richard Taruskin's magnificent Oxford History of Western Music, and to express that opinion - however unfathomable it may seem -- on amazon.com.

But inaccuracies, especially at the core of so damning a response to a new book, must not remain unchallenged.

Let's start with Anonymous IV's insinuation that Taruskin lacks expertise in music before 1800. (According to Anonymous IV, Taruskin's "superficial" and "sketchy" first two volumes summarize "the extent of what the author knows about music before 1800"; he is "obviously... on home turf" only in the 19th and 20th centuries.)

Perhaps Anonymous IV cannot imagine a musicologist being on home turf in more than one period. But Taruskin is just such a rare being: a formidable scholar of 19th- and 20th-century Russian music, he is equally celebrated in the realm of early music. His influential book, Text and Act (1995), contains numerous essays on pre-19th-century music. And even the brief author's biography on the back cover of that book informs us that Taruskin has published "numerous editions of Renaissance music, including a complete edition with commentary of the sacred music of [the 15th-century composer] Antoine Busnoys," and that while teaching at Columbia University, Taruskin had a distinguished performing career in early music. (Among other activities, he conducted the Cappella Nova, a New York-based choir specializing in medieval and Renaissance music; as a viola da gambist he recorded and toured with the Aulos ensemble.)

Anonymous IV's whining that Taruskin "rushes through more than 1000 years of music history" is no less mystifying. Hello! Taruskin devotes 1,612 pages to the first 1000 years of notated music in the Western world - rather more than the 843 pages in which Grout/Palisca, to which Anonymous IV repeatedly compares Taruskin, covers the entire history of Western music.

But most importantly: if Anonymous IV has indeed read Taruskin's History of Western Music, he/she will have found, in its opening paragraphs, (pp. xxi and xxii), a clear statement of the book's aim. It is not, Taruskin explains, a survey à la Grout. Rather, it is "an attempt at a true history" - that is, an attempt "to explain why and how things happened as they did" - in short, not the usual laundry list that has too often passed for music history. To compare Taruskin to Grout on this count is rather like faulting a cognac for not being a beer.

Taruskin fulfills his stated aim exhilaratingly. His book is a towering achievement of scholarship and intellect; a challenge to complacency; a joy to read.

As to the accusation that Oxford's production of Taruskin's book is shoddy: well, I do not know what Anonymous IV has been doing with his/her copy. I have been reading mine, for some weeks now, and have had no problem whatsoever with its binding.
Larosa
We bought this set for our son for Christmas. He is a music teacher. In addition to reading for himself, he plans to use it in the classroom to connect developments in the music world with contemporaneous historical events. The problem with the set is that it cannot be purchased in individual volumes. If the publisher would allow this, it would seem that many more sets would be sold over time.