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Download Alan Lomax, Assistant in Charge: The Library of Congress Letters, 1935-1945 (American Made Music Series) fb2

by Ronald D. Cohen
Download Alan Lomax, Assistant in Charge: The Library of Congress Letters, 1935-1945 (American Made Music Series) fb2
Music
  • Author:
    Ronald D. Cohen
  • ISBN:
    1604738006
  • ISBN13:
    978-1604738001
  • Genre:
  • Publisher:
    University Press of Mississippi (December 8, 2010)
  • Pages:
    480 pages
  • Subcategory:
    Music
  • Language:
  • FB2 format
    1510 kb
  • ePUB format
    1829 kb
  • DJVU format
    1850 kb
  • Rating:
    4.1
  • Votes:
    106
  • Formats:
    lrf doc mbr rtf


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Series: American Made Music Series. The book is broken into three sections-Letters 1935-1938, 1939-1940, and 1941-1945. The letters (or portions of) have a brief preface, so the reader will better understand the context of Lomax's writing. The Rounder Records label has released dozens of albums under the Alan Lomax Collection. As the title implies, this book is a collection of letters from Alan Lomax written during while he was with the Library of Congress.

Alan Lomax (1915-2002) began working for the Archive of American Folk Song at the Library of Congress in 1936, first as a special and temporary assistant, then as the permanent Assistant in Charge, starting in June 1937, until he left in late 1942. Published by: University Press of Mississippi. Alan Lomax (1915-2002) began working for the Archive of American Folk Song at the Library of Congress in 1936, first as a special and temporary assistant, then as the permanent Assistant in Charge, starting in June 1937, until he left in late 1942. He recorded such important musicians as Woody Guthrie, Muddy Waters, Aunt Molly Jackson, and Jelly Roll Morton.

View it in the Music Periodicals Database. correspondence folk music american music musicologists letters alan lomax ronald d cohen.

Assistant in Charge: The Library of Congress Letters, 1935-1945. They make it clear that Lomax was very interested in the commercial hillbilly, race, and even popular recordings of the 1920s and after.

Alan Lomax, Assistant in Charge: The Library of Congress Letters, 1935-1945.

American Made Music Series. Jackson: University Press of Mississippi, c. 2011. The University Press of Mississippi has done a virtually flawless job of setup and typography. Anyone who is worried that the age of the book is over ought to pick this volume up. It is a delight to handle and to read.

Collected correspondence from arguably the most important folklorist of the twentieth century Alan Lomax, Assistant in Charge. American Made Music (Paperback).

Cohen, Ronald D. This button opens a dialog that displays additional images for this product with the option to zoom in or out. Tell us if something is incorrect. Alan Lomax, Assistant in Charge : The Library of Congress Letters, 1935-1945. Collected correspondence from arguably the most important folklorist of the twentieth century Alan Lomax, Assistant in Charge. University Press of Mississippi.

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Alan Lomax (1915-2002) began working for the Archive of American Folk Song at the Library of Congress in 1936, first as a special and temporary assistant, then as the permanent Assistant in Charge, starting in June 1937, until he left in late 1942. He recorded such important musicians as Woody Guthrie, Muddy Waters, Aunt Molly Jackson, and Jelly Roll Morton. A reading and examination of his letters from 1935 to 1945 reveal someone who led an extremely complex, fascinating, and creative life, mostly as a public employee.

While Lomax is noted for his field recordings, these collected letters, many signed "Alan Lomax, Assistant in Charge," are a trove of information until now available only at the Library of Congress. They make it clear that Lomax was very interested in the commercial hillbilly, race, and even popular recordings of the 1920s and after. These letters serve as a way of understanding Lomax's public and private life during some of his most productive and significant years. Lomax was one of the most stimulating and influential cultural workers of the twentieth century. Here he speaks for himself through his voluminous correspondence.