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by The Very Reverend John Drury,John Drury
Download Painting the Word: Christian Pictures and Their Meanings fb2
History & Criticism
  • Author:
    The Very Reverend John Drury,John Drury
  • ISBN:
    0300092946
  • ISBN13:
    978-0300092943
  • Genre:
  • Publisher:
    Yale University Press (April 1, 2002)
  • Pages:
    160 pages
  • Subcategory:
    History & Criticism
  • Language:
  • FB2 format
    1332 kb
  • ePUB format
    1765 kb
  • DJVU format
    1118 kb
  • Rating:
    4.7
  • Votes:
    206
  • Formats:
    rtf lrf lit doc


I sought out supplemental materials to help fill out the outline, and Drury's text serves the purpose in many ways.

Painting the Word book. Start by marking Painting the Word: Christian Pictures and Their Meanings as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read. The Very Reverend John Henry Drury (born 23 May 1936), DD is an Anglican priest and author, Chaplain of All Souls College, Oxford since 2003.

They become the poetry of such eternal human concerns as birth, death, sacrifice, love and moral goodness and failure.

They become the poetry of such eternal human concerns as birth, death, sacrifice, love, and moral goodness and failure

Drury looks at religious paintings through the ages and presents them as works filled with passion, stories and meaning.

Drury looks at religious paintings through the ages and presents them as works filled with passion, stories and meaning. He views the whole picture, its composition, colour, figures, even architecture, examining how they speak to audiences across time and space allowing us to respond at a more imaginative, empathetic level. Glorious images, beautiful ideas. com User, December 30, 2005. This book is without doubt one of the more beautifully prepared and printed books in my collection. Done by the Yale University Press in association with the National Gallery of London, virtually every page is a treasure.

Painting the Word: Christian Pictures and Their Meanings (Paperback) . They become the poetry of such eternal human concerns as birth, death, sacrifice, love, and moral goodness and failure.

Painting the World: Christian Pictures and Their Meanings. This book began as a Christmas gift, and it deserves to play that role again for any art lovers-experts and neophytes both-on your holiday list. Painting the World: Christian Pictures and Their Meanings. In his introduction, John Drury recounts his fourth Christmas sermon as Dean of Christ Church, Oxford. As people entered the cathedral, they were handed postcards of Poussin's Adoration of the Shepherds.

Bibliographic Details. Title: Painting the Word: Christian Pictures and. Publisher: Yale University Press. Publication Date: 2003. Standard shipping can on occasion take up to 30 days for delivery. List this Seller's Books.

Renaissance art aficionados will want Painting the Word: Christian Pictures and their Meanings as their gallery companions.

This is fascinating, religiously revivifying, and just plain revealing art history, cleanly, intelligently, and yes, reverently written. Renaissance art aficionados will want Painting the Word: Christian Pictures and their Meanings as their gallery companions. Drury’s examples enable easy extrapolation. A book that is a delight to the ey. .

Christianity is another country, says John Drury, and we need to familiarize ourselves with it in order to understand the universal meaning of its art. In this beautifully written book, Drury, an Anglican priest and theologian, looks at religious paintings through the ages and presents them to us in a fresh way―as works filled with passion, stories, and meaning. They become the poetry of such eternal human concerns as birth, death, sacrifice, love, and moral goodness and failure.Drury points out the religious meanings in paintings that range from works by Piero della Francesca to those by Velazquez. In each case he views the whole picture―its composition, color, drawing, figures, and even architecture―and shows how it creates a religious image that addresses the spectator as a spiritual human being. Drury also provides a historical context for the works, comparing our perception with the perceptions of, for example, the medieval monarch or the Renaissance merchant who first commissioned the work. He examines how these pictures are able to speak to audiences across time and space, and in the process he allows us to respond to them at a more imaginative, empathetic level.

Agalas
This is an absolutely exquisite book, with highgloss paper and wonderful color reproductions of marvelous paintings.
To this, Drury offers his expert commentary on how one might look at these paintings to see the painter's perspective on the Christian faith.
One will learn much about looking at paintings, and will never casually observe a painting again. I especially have grown fond of two paintings that this marvelous book acquainted me with, Titian's "Vendramin Family" and Lippi's "The Annunciation." Drury's comments here are very useful.
I would like to give this five stars, but withheld this because of my disagreement theologically with Drury. His theology is far too liberal for me, and I'm afraid that he will sway many who will trust his opinion of Divine Scripture as "the gospel truth, or historical critical truth."
A book to consider to turn to to aid one in viewing Christian painting.
Braendo
Thought provoking book that is worth its price. The pictures went well with the explanations. The division of sections into time periods was helpful.
Kirizius
Loved "musing through it; beautiful pictures. It'll take some dedicated time to read & incorporate the message.
Snake Rocking
Delivery was prompt. Item was as described.
Shakagul
This book is without doubt one of the more beautifully prepared and printed books in my collection. Done by the Yale University Press in association with the National Gallery of London, virtually every page is a treasure. There are nearly two hundred full-colour-process reproductions of artworks throughout the text, and every page (not just the colour plates) are heavy bond, high-gloss stock that shows the ink and colour with vibrancy and depth.

John Drury spent a career at both Cambridge and Oxford dealing in matters of theology, ecclesiology, liturgy, and art. I discovered Drury's book while attending a course at my own seminary on the church and the arts, and kept finding myself frustrated at the rapid pace we would go through topics (a frustration I know the professor teaching the course shared - how does one do justice to 2000 years of music, architecture, and art in a mere 15 sessions?). I sought out supplemental materials to help fill out the outline, and Drury's text serves the purpose in many ways.

Drury states his purpose early in the text. `This is a book about how Christian paintings convey their messages. It takes on whole paintings. It is not content with just picking symbols out of them for identification. Composition, colour, contents (including architecture and landscape as well as figures) and the ways in which the paint itself is handled - all are treated as part and parcel of their religious meanings.' This is a holy and holistic approach.

Drury adopts a kind of picture-describing approach (one that he terms `historically iconographical'). This involves absorbing details while understanding context and material. This is the same kind of attention that worship requires (and indeed, the Eastern church has always had this kind of physical artistic interplay with the tradition of use of icons for prayer, meditation and worship purposes) - it requires an openness to experience and feeling while also benefitting from understanding and guidance.

Major artists and works studied in detail in this text include the work of Tiepolo (c. 1750s), the Wilton Diptych (anonymous, c. 1390s), Titian (c. 1510-40s), Duccio (c. 1310s), Filippo Lippi (c. 1450s), Poussin (c. 1630-50s), Rembrandt (c. 1640s), Piero della Francesca (c. 1450-70s), Caravaggio (c. 1600s), Rubens (c. 1630s), Velazquez (c. 1610s), Cezanne (c. 1900s), and others. Most presentations begin by showing the whole work, then proceeding to look at individual characteristics or highlights often pulled aside in side images or isolated for greater emphasis. The text and artwork is arranged in good pattern throughout the text.

Throughout his text, Drury makes a repeated call for care, meditation and attention to be given to the artwork as well as the response to the artwork. He makes that statement that we should stay in front of the images `longer than people usually do' - noticing in museums, art shops, churches and other places that people tend to shuffle past rather than give attention to the most stunning and sublime works of art. Drury draws in history, theology, philosophy, literature, biblical references and images, and other cultural and contextual references to make the experience of these works a full and profound one. This is not a book to be read quickly or glanced over lightly.

Drury includes a narrative annotated bibliography rather than a simple list; he provides both a general bibliography for the entire text as well as a selected bibliography for each chapter/topic.

This is a wonderful book, a great gift for oneself or for others. It is particularly good for those who want a deeper experience and understanding of the way in which art has and can interact and enhance one's relationship with Christianity and its message.
Vudogal
Reasoned analysis involves dissection of statements and dissection of images. The dissection is needed to detect evidence or to expose the lack thereof. The reason analysis of images is needed is that all of the images are not natural. They are iconic based on conventions (like language) and therefore Christian images are signs. The discipline to investigate them is not the neuropsychology of perception but semiotics, the science of signs. Here we have an excellent semiotic rhetoric of Christian images informing us of the meaning of the signs and the meaning behind the images given to us by an expert in both religion (John Drury is a priest) and in the history of art. The cross, the scourging pillar, the spear and the sponge on a cane -all these have meaning. Particularly interesting was Chapter three with the dissection of the different presentations of the annunciation by Duccio as compared to Lippi and Poussin and the biblical quotes that supported each artist's view of what happened and how it happened.
Cel
On the most basic of levels, John Drury, Dean of Christ Church, Oxford, provides a rich commentary on paintings with religious and Biblical themes hanging in The National Gallery, London. He admits from the start that he will be introducing the reader to a Christian world-view that he cannot take for granted, as the painters he surveys did. His writing, while exquisite, did not immediately captivate me. However, his insights and appreciation for the details of these paintings kept me reading through to the conclusion. Drury concentrates on selected works from the Middle Ages, through the Renaissance and Baroque, to Velazquez in the 17th Century. In so doing, he demonstrates how many of the central ideas of Christendom reflected the style, cultural currents, and science of their day. He sees the progression of religious painting into the secular as a natural development in artistic production and theological thought.
I wish Drury had used more examples outside the walls of The National Gallery. He made me want to spend more time with Rembrandt. He places Rubens as a pacifist. He also tantalizes the reader with an excursion into the modern, with appreciation for a couple of works of Cezanne which he augments with quotes from Dietrich Bonhoeffer. He eloquently ends the main section of the book with a marvelous description of any artist who provides a sense of the revelatory: "...painters, if they are to be `God's spies', have to go a good way further than theologians down the ethical road of incarnation, with the silent renunciations, the obedient humility and the love of the world of mortal appearances which it demands, if they are to make the mystery of things visible."