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by Jim Leach
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History & Criticism
  • Author:
    Jim Leach
  • ISBN:
    0195419510
  • ISBN13:
    978-0195419511
  • Genre:
  • Publisher:
    Oxford University Press (April 27, 2006)
  • Pages:
    200 pages
  • Subcategory:
    History & Criticism
  • Language:
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Film in Canada offers a comprehensive examination of Canadian cinema in its political and cultural contexts.

Film in Canada offers a comprehensive examination of Canadian cinema in its political and cultural contexts. While highlighting the films and filmmakers that have defined the national industry since the 1960s, this book also looks at many of the factors that have influenced Canadian filmmaking, including Canada's ethnic and linguistic diversity, the country's national identity, and the emergence of a global media marketplace.

Jim Leach is professor emeritus in the Department of Communication, Popular Culture and Film at Brock University. He is the author of books on filmmakers Alain Tanner and Claude Jutra, as well as the author of British Film and Film in Canada.

Film in Canada has been added to your Cart. Jim Leach is professor and director of the Interdisciplinary MA in Popular Culture program in the Department of Communications, Popular Culture and Film at Brock University.

Newmarket, Ontario, Canada. In 1983, Jim Carrey dated singer Linda Ronstadt for 8 months. Carrey has been married twice. In the film, Carrey plays a man who becomes obsessed with the number 23, after finding a book about a man with the same obsession. The film was panned by critics. His first marriage was to former actress and Comedy Store waitress Melissa Womer, whom he married on March 28, 1987.

Contemporary perspective. Draws attention to the most significant influences on Canadian filmmaking, including ethnic and linguistic diversity, national identity, Hollywood, and the global marketplace. Offers thorough coverage of the topics and critical themes essential to discussions surrounding Canadian cinema, highlighting films from the 1960s to the present. Gives students a thorough treatment of cinematic variation across the country.

era of the seventies; Canada's achievements in animation; and the important contributions of key feature films and their directors in articulating insights into the cultural grammars found in Canadian society throughout the past century

era of the seventies; Canada's achievements in animation; and the important contributions of key feature films and their directors in articulating insights into the cultural grammars found in Canadian society throughout the past century.

Jim Leach is professor of film studies and communication studies at Brock University. He focuses both on the films and the historical and cultural contexts in which they were made, arguing that critics have frequently used inappropriate criteria to judge them and that these misunderstandings reveal much about attitudes to Canadian cinema in general. Jutra's films are shown to reflect the instability of their cinematic and cultural contexts and raise important questions about nationhood.

FILM IN CANADA Jim Leach Toronto: Oxford University Press, 2006, 196 pp. Two new books survey the terrain of Canadian cinema, each striving to present a cohesive, d snapshot of a national cinema with an insecure identity

FILM IN CANADA Jim Leach Toronto: Oxford University Press, 2006, 196 pp. Two new books survey the terrain of Canadian cinema, each striving to present a cohesive, d snapshot of a national cinema with an insecure identity. While Jerry White's anthology, The Cinema of Canada, comprises twenty-four essays focussed on films drawn from the categories of English-Canadian, Québécois and Aboriginal cinema, Jim Leach's monograph, Film in Canada, takes a topic-centred approach to the examination of key assumptions.

Film in Canada presents a comprehensive discussion of Canadian cinema in its political and cultural contexts. It purposefully leaves open the question of whether Canada has one national cinema or two (English-Canadian and Quebecois) since this will allow for greater flexibility in how the text is used in the classroom. The chapters are organized around specific topics, exploring both historical trends and contemporary examples; they can be used in sequence or independently. The films discussed are important and representative Canadian works. A filmography is included at the end of the book, along with distribution information for films discussed in the text. Film in Canada is suitable for use in Canadian film courses (both in Film Studies and Canadian Studies programs), while also being accessible to general readers with an interest in Canadian culture.