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by Negar Mottahedeh
Download Displaced Allegories: Post-Revolutionary Iranian Cinema fb2
History & Criticism
  • Author:
    Negar Mottahedeh
  • ISBN:
    0822342758
  • ISBN13:
    978-0822342755
  • Genre:
  • Publisher:
    Duke University Press Books (November 14, 2008)
  • Pages:
    216 pages
  • Subcategory:
    History & Criticism
  • Language:
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  • Rating:
    4.9
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She argues that the Iranian film industry found creative ground not in the negation of government regulations but in the camera’s adoption of the modest, averted gaze. In the process, the filmic techniques and cinematic technologies were gendered as feminine and the national cinema was produced as a woman’s cinema.

Finally, a book about post-Revolutionary Iranian cinema that is not another general or political history of that cinema but an innovative, sustained, and rigorous analysis of it using film theory. Displaced Allegories is a highly original work. Hamid Naficy, author of An Accented Cinema: Exilic and Diasporic Filmmaking. Displaced Allegories is an extremely timely book. Questions of feminine sexuality and desire are shown to have a national-political purchase in Mottahedeh's analysis.

To date, this scholarship has produced several volumes on the social and political history of Iranian cinema as well as a few auteur studies, albeit limited to the work of only two prominent directors: Abbas Kiarostami and Mohsen Makhmalbaf (1). Indeed, to a certain extent, Mottahedeh’s book continues the auteurist impulse by structuring each of the book’s three chapters around analyses

Negar Mottahedeh is a cultural critic and film theorist specializing in interdisciplinary and feminist contributions to the fields of Middle Eastern Studies and . Displaced Allegories: Post-Revolutionary Iranian Cinema. Duke University Press, 2008.

Negar Mottahedeh is a cultural critic and film theorist specializing in interdisciplinary and feminist contributions to the fields of Middle Eastern Studies and Film Studies. Representing the Unpresentable: Images of Reform from the Qajars to the Islamic Republic of Iran.

book by Negar Mottahedeh. Following the 1979 Iranian Revolution, Iran's film industry, in conforming to the Islamic Republic's system of modesty, had to ensure that women on-screen were veiled from the view of men. This prevented Iranian filmmakers from making use of the desiring gaze, a staple cinematic system of looking.

She argues that the Iranian film industry found new creative ground not in the negation of government regulations but in the camera's adoption of the modest, averted gaze. The filmic techniques and cinematic technologies were gendered feminine in the process; the national cinema was produced as a woman's cinema.

Negar Mottahedeh, author of Displaced Allegories: Post-Revolutionary Iranian Cinema (Duke University Press, 2008), discusses the 30th anniversary of the Iranian Islamic Revolution, Ayatollah Khomeni, and the International Fajr Film festival.

displaced allegories. The publication of Displaced Allegories, by Negar Mottahedeh, augurs promising new developments for the study of post-revolutionary Iranian cinema. displaced allegories. Until recently, studies of the rich topics relating to this cinema have been divided between a number of scholars who have produced largely sociopolitical readings of Iranian films as a ‘national cinema’ (. Dabashi, 2001; Tapper, 2004; Zeydabadi-Nejad, 2009), and a small number of scholars of film studies who have been limited by their lack of training in the.

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Following the 1979 Iranian Revolution, Iran’s film industry, in conforming to the Islamic Republic’s system of modesty, had to ensure that women on-screen were veiled from the view of men. This prevented Iranian filmmakers from making use of the desiring gaze, a staple cinematic system of looking. In Displaced Allegories Negar Mottahedeh shows that post-Revolutionary Iranian filmmakers were forced to create a new visual language for conveying meaning to audiences. She argues that the Iranian film industry found creative ground not in the negation of government regulations but in the camera’s adoption of the modest, averted gaze. In the process, the filmic techniques and cinematic technologies were gendered as feminine and the national cinema was produced as a woman’s cinema.

Mottahedeh asserts that, in response to the prohibitions against the desiring look, a new narrative cinema emerged as the displaced allegory of the constraints on the post-Revolutionary Iranian film industry. Allegorical commentary was not developed in the explicit content of cinematic narratives but through formal innovations. Offering close readings of the work of the nationally popular and internationally renowned Iranian auteurs Bahram Bayza’i, Abbas Kiarostami, and Mohsen Makhmalbaf, Mottahedeh illuminates the formal codes and conventions of post-Revolutionary Iranian films. She insists that such analyses of cinema’s visual codes and conventions are crucial to the study of international film. As Mottahedeh points out, the discipline of film studies has traditionally seen film as a medium that communicates globally because of its dependence on a (Hollywood) visual language assumed to be universal and legible across national boundaries. Displaced Allegories demonstrates that visual language is not necessarily universal; it is sometimes deeply informed by national culture and politics.