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by Lindsay Pollock
Download The Girl With the Gallery: Edith Gregor Halpert And the Making of the Modern Art Market fb2
History & Criticism
  • Author:
    Lindsay Pollock
  • ISBN:
    1586483021
  • ISBN13:
    978-1586483029
  • Genre:
  • Publisher:
    PublicAffairs (October 30, 2006)
  • Pages:
    504 pages
  • Subcategory:
    History & Criticism
  • Language:
  • FB2 format
    1235 kb
  • ePUB format
    1182 kb
  • DJVU format
    1962 kb
  • Rating:
    4.4
  • Votes:
    779
  • Formats:
    rtf mobi lit rtf


Until now. In The Girl with the Gallery, journalist Lindsay Pollock brings Halpert . This book provided a nice view of the New York art scene prior to the explosion of the abstract expressionists.

Until now. In The Girl with the Gallery, journalist Lindsay Pollock brings Halpert and her era vividly back to life, tracing the story of how this remarkable woman, who started out a penniless Jewish immigrant, made it her mission to fight for American art and artists. Illlustrated with eight pages of full color photographs, this is biography at its finest, an unforgettable story of class, money, vanity, jealousy, and tragic loss.

It was immediately sent on a national tour, and Mrs. Halpert represented Lawrence for the next 11 years. Mrs. Halpert’s obscurity may reflect that she discovered very few artists, and none with the implicit glamour of a Georgia O’Keeffe or a Jackson Pollock.

Lindsay Pollock is a journalist specializing in the art market. She currently works for Bloomberg News, where she writes a weekly column and reports frequently for TV and radio. This is her first book. Lindsay lives in New York City. Country of Publication.

Indeed, she had a pivotal role in the creation of the American modern art market

Indeed, she had a pivotal role in the creation of the American modern art market. My only criticisms of this book, Pollock’s first, are that she too often refers to Halpert’s hardscrabble youth, which in fact was comfortable relative to the hand-to-mouth lives of most Jewish immigrants from Eastern Europe, and that she sometimes does not reach deep enough into her journalist’s toolbox.

book by Lindsay Pollock  . Not only was Mrs. Halpert a consummate businesswoman, she also started several trends in American art that still affect us today.

Chicago Distribution Center. The National Council of American-Soviet Friendship and Art in the Shadow of the Cold War. Bailey. Art Is Not the Archive. Mobility for the Masses: The Reception of Thomas Hovenden’s Breaking Home Ties. In Conversation: Art Is Not the Archive. Lubin et al. Siting Childe Hassam.

In The Girl with the Gallery, journalist Lindsay Pollock brings Halpert and her era vividly back to life, tracing the story of how this remarkable woman, who started out a penniless Jewish immigrant, made it her mission to fight for American art and artists.

PublicAffairs, 2006 .

Pollock focuses on Halpert’s major achievement, the establishment of the Downtown Gallery, one of the first galleries for modern American art in Greenwich Village.

In an era when American artists didn't count and women were expected to stay home, Edith Gregor Halpert burst onto the fledgling New York gallery scene, defying all cultural and societal rules. In 1926, Halpert, just twenty-six years old, opened one of the first art galleries in Greenwich Village and set about turning the art world upside down. Her Downtown Gallery, which she ran for forty-four years, laid the groundwork for the art market's modern era, and its aggressive promotion and sales tactics. Halpert cultivated the most illustrious art collectors of the day, invented the market for folk art, and pushed the first group of American artists working in a modern vernacular into the history books, including Stuart Davis, Jacob Lawrence, Georgia O'Keeffe, Ben Shahn, and Arthur Dove. Despite all this, Edith Halpert herself has been lost to history. Until now.

In The Girl with the Gallery, journalist Lindsay Pollock brings Halpert and her era vividly back to life, tracing the story of how this remarkable woman, who started out a penniless Jewish immigrant, made it her mission to fight for American art and artists. Illlustrated with eight pages of full color photographs, this is biography at its finest, an unforgettable story of class, money, vanity, jealousy, and tragic loss.


Jorad
Art historian and blogger, Lindsay Pollock, takes a good look at the life and times of Edith Gregor Halpert, a pioneer in the selling of modern American art in the first half of the 20th Century. Born with the new century in Odessa, Edith Halpert emigrated from Russia with her widowed mother and older sister in the year 1906. Settling in New York City, the trio had the usual immigrant troubles, but Edith - a go-getter almost from birth - made her way in the 1910's and 1020's, establishing an art gallery "downtown", devoted to selling the work of American artists. After marrying and divorcing one such artist, Sam Halpert, Edith spent the remainder of her long life, chasing the artists, the collectors and patrons, and the museums, all of who - together - make the "art world".

Edith was helped out early by the patronage of Abby Aldrich Rockefeller - wife of John Jr and mother of Nelson - who saw the value in collecting American art. She was adept at selling and promoting "her" artists even in bad economic times. "The Downtown Gallery" eventually moved "uptown" but never changed its name or its championing of American artists. But after WW2 when a new generation of artists took over the art scene - including Jackson Pollock - Edith Halpert and her gallery were left behind. Her last few years in the business were on a down trend, but she maintained her reputation for presenting good art.

Lindsay Pollock - no relation to Jackson, I assume - is an excellent writer. Her biography of Edith Helpert is also an in depth look at the American art scene from 1920 to 1960. Helpert was in the middle of it and Pollock explains it quite well.
Chuynopana
A solid biography of a woman, who, from the early to middle part of the last century, was at the commercial center of American art.

The deceased and almost forgotten Edith Gregor Halpert, an immigrant with drive, is blessed with a thorough and admiring biography by Lindsay Pollock, a knowledgeable writer on things related to the New York art scene.

If you want to know more about how a small commercial art gallery actually operated; big money collectors, such as Mrs. Rockefeller and son Nelson; artists, such as Alfred Stieglitz, Georgia O'Keefe, and Jacob Lawrence; and such important threads of the art world as early American primitives--buy and read this book.

It is a tribute to the power of one focused person, who made a difference in what were hard times for American artists.
Taur
I'm not quite finished with this book yet - I am reading it a little at a time over my lunch breaks - but I love it immensely. The detail is amazing, from the many correspondences quoted to the accounting of Halpert's inventory of artists and artworks. I'm just now getting through Halpert's delve into American Folk Art and the purchase of her summer cottage, about halfway through the book. Ms. Pollack's rich account of Halpert's life and business is a great read, and I only have two regrets: (1) that I didn't choose art as a career when I was young, and (2) that I will be finished with this book in about two weeks.

If you are looking for a quick read about the general life of a gallery owner, move along. Whether you are an artist, gallerist, or simply an appreciator of fine art, this book will transport you to Edith's world of art in New York.
Faehn
This recent book (2006) is well researched and the bibliography is extensive and impressive. It does treat Edith Halpert in a sometimes "only female" Gallery owner role - and there were many more than just her. Not mentioning other key female gallery owners in New York at that time is a major and curious ommission. Betty Parsons, Peggy Guggenheim, and even the later Virginia Zabriskie are important aspects of a thorough study involving how Edith might have interacted with these important figures. Still, the book was very readable and provides many interesting and historical facts to the art world of that period. Some details about who was buying art at this time is often ommited in other studies around this subject. - Michael Eggert, Novato, CA Ph.D. (Art History)
GawelleN
Artists should read this book & make note of all the marketing methods Edith Gregor Halpert employed to make it in the art world ... (actually this should be required reading for all gallery owners & curators too...) Come to think of it , anyone involved somehow in art should read this book ... (also , it is interesting how possibly the lead in oil paints caused ear troubles & related brain tumor in those working close to paint- makes one think that is what Van Gogh also suffered from - lead poisoning ...makes one re-evaluate toxicity & proximity as well as ear problems in artists , starting with tinnitus , like a ringing in one's ears ... is madness among artists just lead poisoning ?) ... fascinating stuff...great read ...
Steelrunner
I had a lot of trouble putting aside the book so that I could take care of my normal daily chores and business. It was interesting to me from a variety of points. One of them was the excellent introduction information about how the author first learned of Edith Gegor Halpet and then how surprised she was to discover a treasure trove of available research material including an oral history that included more than 800 transcrbed pages. While I'm not in the gallery business, I do enjoy art and I found the book a very interesting story of how tough a business the marketing of art really is. Halpert's struggles opening and running a gallery have valuable lessons for any small business owner. Some of her sales techniques could be applied to almost any business with great success. The book is a great read and provides glimpses into the world of art, artists, patrons, museums, and the important contributions women have made to the art fields over the years. It's another example of how women have come into their own.