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by Leonard Kahan,Donna Page,Pascal James Imperato
Download Surfaces: Color, Substances, and Ritual Applications on African Sculpture (African Expressive Cultures) fb2
History & Criticism
  • Author:
    Leonard Kahan,Donna Page,Pascal James Imperato
  • ISBN:
    0253352517
  • ISBN13:
    978-0253352514
  • Genre:
  • Publisher:
    Indiana University Press (April 30, 2009)
  • Pages:
    536 pages
  • Subcategory:
    History & Criticism
  • Language:
  • FB2 format
    1300 kb
  • ePUB format
    1577 kb
  • DJVU format
    1413 kb
  • Rating:
    4.2
  • Votes:
    446
  • Formats:
    mbr docx lit rtf


Leonard Kahan, Donna Page, Pascal James Imperato, eds. Surfaces: Color, Substances, and Ritual Applications on. .

Leonard Kahan, Donna Page, Pascal James Imperato, eds. Surfaces: Color, Substances, and Ritual Applications on African Sculpture. Bloomington: Indiana University Press, 2009. They based their analyses largely on ethnographic data gathered from the respective African cultures where the pieces originated, and consequently were able to reconstruct a valid history of the pieces. By pushing the boundaries beyond stereotypes through the incorporation of the voices of the people that owned and used these artifacts, the text has achieved another milestone in the study of African material and visual culture.

Bloomington and Indianapolis: Indiana University Press, 2009.

In the book the authors assert that the surfaces of African sculptures, like their forms, are imbued with important cultural meanings and that these surfaces require detailed study.

Leonard Ka han. Donna Page, and Pascal Imperato, eds. Bloomington Indiana University Press, 2009. 536 pp. 122 Color Photographs. The three case studies that follow - Imperato on Bamana sculpture, Bordogna on Yoruba ibeji, and Campbell on Yoruba orisa - narrow the focus as each of these authors investigates the particularities and nuances of the relationship among surface embellishments, aesthetic systems, local belief systems, and meaning in the making and use of objects among the Bamana and Yoruba, respectively.

Every piece of African woodcarving has an embellished surface, whether it is dyed, pigmented, refurbished, or encrusted with sacrificial matter. Surfaces is the first book to present a detailed study of what happens to African wood sculpture from its creation to its ritual use and "retirement. Cristen marked it as to-read Apr 15, 2013.

Recommend this journal. Abstract views reflect the number of visits to the article landing page. Views captured on Cambridge Core between

Surfaces is the first book to present a detailed study of what happens to African wood sculpture from its creation to its ritual use and "retirement. The six essays by distinguished African art historians investigate cultural practices associated with surface decoration, the practitioners responsible for the applications, and the reasons for the use of specific materials. Luxurious color and black-and-white photographs embellish the text and illustrate the power and potency of African sculpture. A comprehensive listing of colorings and raw materials is also included.

Surfaces by Leonard Kahan, Donna Page, Pascal James Imperato, 2009, Indiana . Agents of transformation, Donna Page. African expressive cultures.

Agents of transformation, Donna Page. Surface symbols: the meanings of color, patina, encrustation, and design on Bamana sculpture, Pascal James Imperato. Ibeji surface analysis, Charles Bordogna. Coloring the orisa, Bolaji Campbell. Surface conditions of wood sculpture, Leonard Kahan. Compendium of substances, Donna Page. Includes bibliographical references and index.

Leonard Kahan, Donna Page, and Pascal James Imperato, eds. Surfaces: Color, Substances, and Ritual Applications . Surfaces: Color, Substances, and Ritual Applications on African Sculpture Bloomington: Indiana University Press, 2009. 524 p. 122 color ills. Audiences of nineteenth- and twentieth-century African art can frequently be found pressing their noses up against museum-cabinet glass trying to find a better view of the object. This is because one of the most exciting aspects of African sculptural work is the complex surface detail. Even more aggravating for the viewer, the exhibition label often features a non-descript text noting that the work is made of wood and organic matter.

Surfaces: Color, Substances and Ritual Applications on African Sculpture" is the current one, and .

Surfaces: Color, Substances and Ritual Applications on African Sculpture" is the current one, and it's impressive. These enhancements take various forms that the curators - Donna Page, an art historian, and Leonard Kahan, a former art dealer - illustrate by grouping objects under descriptive categories like "encrustation," "color," "patina" and "multiple materials.

Every piece of African woodcarving has an embellished surface, whether it is dyed, pigmented, refurbished, or encrusted with sacrificial matter. Surfaces is the first book to present a detailed study of what happens to African wood sculpture from its creation to its ritual use and "retirement." The six essays by distinguished African art historians investigate cultural practices associated with surface decoration, the practitioners responsible for the applications, and the reasons for the use of specific materials. Luxurious color and black-and-white photographs embellish the text and illustrate the power and potency of African sculpture. A comprehensive listing of colorings and raw materials is also included. For students, museum professionals, and collectors, this book will become an important reference which inspires new appreciations of African art and artistry.


Wetiwavas
Hardcover, embossed cloth boards with photographic DJ, 523 Pages, 11.25" x 8.75", Edited by Leonard Kahan, Donna Page, Pascal James Imperato. In collaboration with Charles Bordogna, Bolaji Campbell and Patrick McNaughton. 67 color plates one item-to-a-page, 51 other illustrations in color and B/W including African artworks and field photos. Appendix 1 : Pigments, Dyes, and Material Applications. Appendix 2 : Woods used for carving. Two separate bibliographies. Extensive notations throughout. Published by Indiana University Press 2009.

Definitely a specialty book focusing on the embellished surfaces of tribal African woodcarving. The surface conditioning of African tribal sculptures include dyes, pigments, encrustations and other surface applications which are meticulously described in sections on the types of materials employed in tribal art objects throughout Africa. Get ready for a huge amount of reading, as this book goes into exhaustive detail on every aspect in the creation of African tribal art. Expect to learn about pigments, dyes, shells, textiles, metals, teeth, woods, rubbings, fibers, chalk, feathers, furs, fangs, raffia, latticework, bark, beads, skin, ivory, stone, bones, nails, hair, chains, oils, kaolin, scarification, perforations, erosion, smoked areas, insect damage, leather, and many other components of African Tribal Art.

Even though it is certainly a "specialty" study, this is a fantastic contribution to my understanding of African Art, and if you have the patience, it really helps in the understanding of how these wonderful objects are created. Also, the objects featured are of a superior standard, and not the same ones you see in every other book on African Art. Highly recommended an essential addition to any decent library of African Tribal art.

BOOK RATING : 9/10
Centrizius
Excellent book, a must for any serious African art collector. Even the introduction is very interesting. It will take me some time to explore and use all the data included in this book.