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by Tom Wolfe
Download From Bauhaus to Our House fb2
Architecture
  • Author:
    Tom Wolfe
  • ISBN:
    0312429142
  • ISBN13:
    978-0312429140
  • Genre:
  • Publisher:
    Picador; First edition (November 24, 2009)
  • Pages:
    128 pages
  • Subcategory:
    Architecture
  • Language:
  • FB2 format
    1623 kb
  • ePUB format
    1423 kb
  • DJVU format
    1836 kb
  • Rating:
    4.5
  • Votes:
    449
  • Formats:
    mbr lrf lit mobi


In this examination of the strange saga of twentieth century architecture.

Books for People with Print Disabilities. Internet Archive Books. Uploaded by loader-DanaB on May 12, 2010.

Tom Wolfe's short work, From Bauhaus to Our House, is little more than a screed against the excesses of modern architecture. While agreeing with many of his conclusions, I found the style and tone of the book to be inappropriate for the purpose of serious art/architecture criticism

Tom Wolfe's short work, From Bauhaus to Our House, is little more than a screed against the excesses of modern architecture. While agreeing with many of his conclusions, I found the style and tone of the book to be inappropriate for the purpose of serious art/architecture criticism. Written in 1981, it seems dated with a quarter century of architectural progress having occurred since it was published

From Bauhaus to Our House is a 1981 narrative of Modern architecture, written by Tom Wolfe.

From Bauhaus to Our House is a 1981 narrative of Modern architecture, written by Tom Wolfe. In 1975 Wolfe made his first foray into art criticism with The Painted Word, in which he argued that art theory had become too pervasive because the art world was controlled by a small elitist network of wealthy collectors, dealers and critics. Art critics were, in turn, highly critical of Wolfe's book, arguing that he was a philistine who knew nothing of what he wrote.

In this examination of the strange saga of twentieth century architecture, Wolfe takes such European architects as Ludwig Mies van der Rohe, Le Corbusier, and Bauhaus art school founder Walter Gropius to task for their glass and steel box designed buildings that have influenced-and infected-America’s cities.

Read in our apps: iOS. · Android. From Bauhaus to Our House. To read this book, upload an EPUB or FB2 file to Bookmate. Albers would pick up the cathedral and the airplane and say: These were meant to be made of stone or metal-not newspaper. Then he would pick up the photographer’s absentminded tent and say: But this!-this makes use of the soul of paper. Paper can fold without breaking.

From Bauhaus to Our House. Writing Los Angeles: A Literary Anthology (Library of America).

Tom Wolfe’s earlier squib against Modernism, The Painted Word, was a reasonable succès de scandale among those with enough interest in the New York School of painting to want to defend it, but went little further than that

Tom Wolfe’s earlier squib against Modernism, The Painted Word, was a reasonable succès de scandale among those with enough interest in the New York School of painting to want to defend it, but went little further than that. From Bauhaus to Our House, on the other hand, has achieved the unprecedented feat (in architectural publishing) of making its way, albeit briefly, into the American best-seller lists, along with all those diets, cats and Barbara Cartland. What is more, this startling success has been accompanied by a sustained chorus of outraged disapproval from practically every US critic.

Infobox Book name From Bauhaus to Our House title orig translator image caption author Tom Wolfe .

Wolfe turned his criticism on the International Style and Modern Architecture exemplified by architects such as Ludwig Mies van der Rohe, Le Corbusier and Walter Gropius (the founder of the Bauhaus school in Germany, whose ideas influenced Modern Architecture, and from which the title of the book derives).

Tom Wolfe, "America's most skillful satirist" (The Atlantic Monthly), examines the strange saga of American architecture in this sequel to The Painted Word, From Bauhaus to Our House.

RUsich155
I studied Architecture in the early 60's when the theories described here were in "full bloom". It has taken us a long time to get past stoicism in architecture. As always Tom Wolfe's is funny and entertaining when he delivers his observations on life. Thank you Tom!
Hellmaster
Very funny and informative. I am a cabinet maker and regularly have to watch clients suffer through the nonsense he describes here from architects and designers. I found it fascinating to find out the historical origins.
LivingCross
The book looked new. It arrived more quickly than I expected from a private vendor, in a well protected envelope. A good price, even with the extra shipping charges. And in interesting book if you're interested in how America went from Beau-Arts buildings (quoin block corners, arched windows, ornamentation and peaked roofs with overhangs to shed rain) to the flat-roof, shear façade, 'modern' (dull) buildings of today. I've seen it everywhere...A beautiful Romanesque Church with an extension that looks like it could be a municipal parking garage or a nail factory. Ugh!
Isha
Did you ever walk around the city (any city) and wonder where all those ugly new buildings came from? Why do they all look like identical filing cabinets? Mr Tom Wolfe presents a short, acidic history of how a few people managed to get a lot of us to believe that those concrete and aluminum slabs were works of art. If you've ever harbored suspicions that the emperor had no clothes here's ammunition to say so.
Balladolbine
Amazing story. A story of professorial self annointed European transplanted Architects with a bunch of collegiate lemmings as followers. The emperors who wore no clothes is borne out here. Not the kind of architects I've had the pleasure of working with over the decades. Love em
Maman
Witty, funny, informative. Tom Wolfe is always entertaining, whether it be fiction or non-fiction. Well written, concise and brilliant. Buy it.
AGAD
As a designer of software user experiences, I've seen how modernist tendencies have started to influence products such as Windows 8. I have mixed feelings about that. I've always disliked the cubical, severe, hard-edged, blocky buildings that have dominated architecture since the fifties, and I have some of the same queasiness about blocky, rectangular user interfaces.

This book helped me understand that I wasn't alone in that evaluation. In only ninety pages or so, Tom Wolfe punctures the pretension of many modernist architectures, pointing out how they sacrificed usability, maintainability, and cost to their desire to stay true to a minimalist, rectangular ideal. I think some of his criticisms apply to minimalist modern user interfaces too.

I don't think people want to live in giant blocks. They're soulless and ugly. If you agree, and want to read a witty takedown of such silliness, this is the book you want.
Recommended in a book club setting - although short is the most painful book I have ever read .
The topic is boring but the author is in love with the word ‘bourgeois’ and writes in a obtuse way with wording that requires constant dictionary reference.

Horrible, waste of a book !